The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pane incamiciato di semola di grano duro rimacinata

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Pane incamiciato di semola di grano duro rimacinata

Pane incamiciato literally means "a bread in a shirt" and it always comes off looking quite spectacular. I have been meaning to bake this bread for a while now, but have been somewhat taken aback from making the "shirt" for the bread. I have also wanted to make a bread made of semolina (fine flour made of durum wheat) for some time after coming back from Sicily (with a ton of flour in my luggage), so there goes nothing I said yesterday.

First, I have prepared a stiff levain from my liquid (100%) one as follows:

Stiff levain

Wt (g)

Bread flour

120

Water

60

Liquid starter

80

Total

280

 

 

1. The starter is dissolved into the water and then the flours are added and mixed thoroughly. I used my hands to make sure all the flour is incorporated properly.

2. Leave to rest for 4-6 hours or until it triples in volume.

 

Final dough

Bakers' %

Wt (g)

for 1 kg

Strong white wheat flour

25

200

Fine durum wheat flour (semolina)

75

600

Water

68.75

550

Salt

2.37

19

Stiff levain

35

280

Total

206

1649

 

3. Mix the flours with the water and leave to autolyse for 30 minutes. Add in the stiff levain and salt and mix thoroughly until all the flour is incorporated and the gluten is moderately developed (window pane test). 

4. Bulk fermentation: 2:30 hrs with SF after each 30 minutes

5. Cut two small balls of dough (I made two loaves) and stretch them on a floured surface using a rolling pin

6. Pre-shape the two loaves and leave to rest for 15 minutes.

7. Using a brush, put some olive oil on top of the rolled out dough and add whatever seeds you wish to add (I used black and golden sesame)

8. After the dough has rested, place it in the middle of the dough sheet and „dress” the loaf

6. Place the the loaves in well floured bannetons and keep them refrigerated for 10-12 hours

7. Remove from fridge and score carefully to only cut through the "shirt" and not the loaf itself

8. bake at 230 C for 20 minutes and at 210 C for a further 20 minutes (15 minutes with steam, last 25 dry)

8. Open the oven door and leave the loaves to rest in the cooling oven for 5 minutes more

10. Remove the loaves from oven and carefully take out the works of art.

I actually ended up feeling sorry that I have to cut this up and eat it. :)

Enjoy!

Comments

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I've never seen anything like this before! I'm so glad you made it and posted this. Of course, the last thing I need is another idea to try, but this is gorgeous! Have you managed to close your eyes and cut this masterpiece yet? How is the crumb? I love the taste of durum, but find it tricky to work with.

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Glad you liked it. I haven't yet cut it, will update it as soon as will get the heart to do it. :) But I have to say the semolina has been quite easy to work with.

V.

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Thank you so much for posting. I am bookmarking this!

Question: What is the weight of the small balls of dough that you cut off to make the jackets?

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Thank you. I did not weigh, would estimate around 50-100 g of dough for a jacket. Try woth 50, if that's not enough, you can just add more until you reach the size you need.

the hadster's picture
the hadster

that is spectacular! 

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Appreciate it.

Elsasquerino's picture
Elsasquerino

What a loaf!!

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Appreciate it.

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

Your bread is beautiful! I'm not sure I could bring myself to actually cut it. Thank you so much for sharing!

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I wouldn't want to cut it either  but it is a great concept!

Leslie

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is amazing. Bravo.

Would you mind if I featured this on the homepage for a bit?

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Of course - always an honor. 

joann1536's picture
joann1536

Your bread looks so awesome!

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

My loaf feels pretty :)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I gotta try this!   :)   

I can just imagine breaking off a floppy "ear" or "collar of the shirt" to munch on.   

Your loaf looks pretty! :)

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

It was the most delicious shirt I have ever eaten. :)

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Do you keep the bannetons uncovered in  the fridge?

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

It did feel a bit like doing brain surgery, I must say. :) I keep them covered in a plastic bag in the fridge. 

isand66's picture
isand66

Fantastic!  Wonderful bake!

bread1965's picture
bread1965

I've seen pictures of bread like this but never understood how it was made.. thank you for sharing this.. I will try this one day..  truly an amazing effort. Congratulations!

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

I am glad it helped - and it's actually not that difficult. 

Happy baking everyone!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

This could get interesting....  or get to be too much of a good thing...  Imagine more layers...

#1 lab rat was thinking 8 layers might be too much cracker and not enough bread for a sandwich.  Cool!  That might be made with a series of consecutive sized flattened dough balls.  The loaf would be served up to all those who like to nibble off the ears of loaves.  One big loaf of crackers!  

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Challenge accepted. Will build jackets upon jackets upon other jackets on my next bake. :)

dorkette's picture
dorkette

Thanks for sharing your recipe and technique. I've never seen anything like this before.

_vk's picture
_vk

What a beautiful bread! Congratulations.

Got try some day.

 

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

One of the first sourdough projects I attempted was to replicate Nancy Silverton's chapeau rolls (from Breads From The La Brea Bakery).  This was when Campanile was a popular place in LA and they served the rolls with dinner. The result was that I could bake them at home and compare the result with what was being served at the restaurant (always a treat). One of the keys is dusting the hat with rice flour to keep it from merging back with the bulk of the dough and then pressing all the way through the roll to secure the hat to the top of the roll at a single point.  I think that it might be possible to transfer that technique to this recipe when making multiple layers of jacketing (rice flour dusting) though I am not so sure that it will be so easy to get multiple layers to stick together at the bottom or to slice them all exactly right so that everything blooms symmetrically.

I will be interested in the results.  It is definitely a showy presentation piece.

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Thank you.

SusanMcKennaGrant's picture
SusanMcKennaGrant

can't wait to try this, BRAVO! 

 

SusanMcKennaGrant's picture
SusanMcKennaGrant

:)

Cfraenkel's picture
Cfraenkel

I'm in awe, my DH is after me to try it, but I don't think I'm that brave. 

ralphyo's picture
ralphyo

I started this bread yesterday and baked it this morning - couldn't resist.  Turned out great and WOW does it look fantastic!  Thanks for the inspiration and the recipe!

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Glad to hear you were inspired by it. Won't you share some photos with us? :) Enjoy!

sook's picture
sook

Not as beautiful as yours!

I used rice flour as @Doc dough suggested. As you can see, I think the sleeves got stuck. More oil? More flour? :(

 

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Well done! I did not use any rice flour on the inside of the cover, only counted on olive oil and seeds to get the cover to open up. It looks great.

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

I was actually thinking that the rice flour would be a good parting compound to use between two layers of skin.  And in this case it looks like it was used on the outside only.  The sticking is most likely due to the outer thin layer of dough being too wet or having too few seeds to allow it to break away from the core during the first few minutes of oven spring. So if you are going to try it again, with only one skin, try rolling the skin out with some more durum flour to stiffen in up and use more seeds to coat it and don't use rice flour at all.  If you decide to try two skins, then you might lightly dust the inside of the second skin with rice flour to keep it from sticking to the inner skin.  You may want to combine some durum flour with the rice flour when you roll out the second skin.  I suspect it will take some trial and success to get it just right.

sook's picture
sook

Yeah, I coated the sleeve with rice flour and the main ball with olive oil + seeds. I like the idea of durum flour and rice flour though! Oh wait, I just realized the main problem . *SMH*. I coated the ball, not the sleeve with olive oil and seeds. 

ejm's picture
ejm

applause applause!! That looks fabulous. Many thanks for the explanation!

deva's picture
deva

Hi, I never wrote back to you about my other mess because I concluded I'm not ready to just make my own recipes.  That said I'm kind of doing it again today, but using the info you posted to another person about ratio's.  The stuff looks good and is in pans, its a rich white loaf, with a combo of milk/water &2 egg yolks I needed to use in something.  Now I'm in weird territory about temperature.  I'm going to try f450 for 10, then drop to 425 for 20-30.  I'll score the tops but not sure they need it.  That said it seems that levain breads always use scoring.  Love to hear any wisdom you might want to impart.

We ARE enjoying bread.    

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Good luck and enjoy!:)

UnConundrum's picture
UnConundrum

I can't say more, but I do have a question.  You removed the loaves from the fridge, scored, and baked?  You did not bring the dough back to room temperature?

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Yes, removed from fridge, scored and baked, did not bring the dough to RT. I noticed they keep their form a lot better if i just shove them in the oven straight from fridge. Plus it's so much more convenient. :)

jameseng's picture
jameseng

I am inspired!

SeattleStarter's picture
SeattleStarter

Beautiful! May I ask, baking stone or dutch oven?

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

I bake on a regular stone. Dutch oven, for some reason, never gave me the crust I am looking for.

julie99nl's picture
julie99nl

This is my first post on TFL, but I got so excited when my bread came out of the oven this morning, I really couldn't make an introduction post first!

This bread is lovely, and was lovely and fun to make. I followed this recipe pretty exactly and if I say so myself it turned out better than expected.

 

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Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

well done! So glad the recipe came in handy. Happy world bread day! :)

Shutzie27's picture
Shutzie27

When I saw this photo on the home page, instead of words all that came to mind was the urge to give a very serious, slow-clap standing ovation. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

new meaning.  That is some gorgeous bread that has to be tasty.  Love the way the seeds stick to the middle too.  Well done!

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

My loaf feels humbled. :) I am so happy so many found the recipe and the idea useful.