The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ariete 1596 Impastatrice Compatta Gourmet Professional

restless baker's picture
restless baker

Ariete 1596 Impastatrice Compatta Gourmet Professional

hey guys , i wanna buy a mixer for making my bread dough , i was woundering what do you guys think of Ariete 1596 Impastatrice Compatta Gourmet Professional ??? is it good ? i want a machine thats strong and last for at least a year or 2 .

 http://www.ariete.net/catalog/impastatrici/Gourmet-Professional-Metal-1596#

the hadster's picture
the hadster

I don't know anything about this machine.

I have a Magic Mill, now called the Ankarsrum mixer, that I love.  When I was doing my research, this was the only mixer that could handle 5 pounds of flour.  I have found it to be reliable, well made, and it makes lovely bread doughs.

https://pleasanthillgrain.com/accessories-ankarsrum-magic-mill-dlx-mixer-attachments

Hadster

 
Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

And I also have an Ankarsrum and love it. Note that the new one that has just come out (or is just about to) has an even more powerful motor. The thing I love the most about the Ank is that the motor is in the base so there's basically nothing that gets in the way of adding ingredients part way through the mixing. And I just did a batch of eight (admittedly small) loaves of cheese bread in it, so capacity is not a problem!

the hadster's picture
the hadster

I won't part with my Ankarsrum.   I love that the motor is on the bottom, because it makes mixing so much easier.

Also, when I first got it and was figuring out how to best mix my dough, I took my dough's temperature all the time.  I had read that with mechanical mixing, it was possible to over heat the dough and destroy the gluten.  Anyway, even after 13 minutes of mixing, my dough had only risen 1 degree F.

I use the dough hook and low speed.  I first let the dough hydrate for about 30 minutes or so, at least, and then I switch on the machine and work the dough for 5 minutes.  I let it rest for about 30 minutes, and then I kneed the dough again for about 10.

I have a KA mixer that I love, but for large batches of dough, it fails.  Also, it's about 25 years old, so it has the dough hook and not the spiral hook.

How do you use your Ankarsrum to mix bread dough?

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I have a blog post that I started when I first got the Ankarsrum and was learning to use it (so much different than a planetary mixer). I now use it for all kinds of things - heavy doughs like bagel dough, really wet stuff like ciabatta, bread with lots of add-ins and bread that is very plain. I even use the cookie dough beaters to make gluten-free dough for a couple of customers. I've gotten better at using the roller / scraper combination though I preferred the dough hook when I first started. Some doughs I just mix for about 4 minutes, then develop them further through stretching and folding in a bigger container. Others I'll mix for up to 15 minutes (like you, I find the dough doesn't heat up appreciably). When I got the Ank I immediately sold the KA and haven't missed it at all! :) Mind you, I also have a 30-litre commercial planetary mixer for really big batches.