The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Trying to double my brioche recipe

meganm1989's picture
meganm1989

Trying to double my brioche recipe

I have a really good brioche recipe that I love and I tried to double it using the baker's percentage and it did not turn out. I think it has more to do with the amount of eggs and butter that I put in. Any help would be appreciated and keep in mine that I make sticky buns and cinnamon rolls with this, if that matters.

in a single batch I use 3 eggs and 10 tbs of butter, so I doubled that. Is that how it works?

Typically on a single recipe I get this super elastic, soft putty type of dough and this time I got a dough that was crumby and would tear. I'm going to let it proof longer and hopefully that fixes the problem once I bake it.

EDIT: Turns out I added too much yeast. I went back and looked at my measuring spoons and i used tablespoons until teaspoons. It was like a monster growing, it's still growing actually. I baked a small amount of the dough before I do my final bake tonight and the yeast taste was definitely there but I think I can cut down the strong taste with my caramel and pecan glaze. Fingers crossed it works.

Lechem's picture
Lechem

Doubling should be simple and you did exactly what I would do. Perhaps there is something else going on here. Temperature perhaps? 

meganm1989's picture
meganm1989

turns out I added too much yeast. I'll try again next week with the correct amount of yeast.

ds99303's picture
ds99303

Try making the recipe twice and then combine the two doughs and see what happens.  If it works, then it means you did something wrong with your math or the measuring when you tried to double the recipe.  Remember, weight and volume measurements don't directly convert from one to the other due to the different density of different ingredients.  For example, a cup of granulated  sugar weighs ~ 200 grams.  A cup of all-purpose flour weighs ~125 grams.  Maybe you forgot to double something or you doubled the volume of something when you should have doubled the weight or vice versa.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I would add a Tablespoon of water to make up for the evaporation and see if that helps.  3 eggs may not show a difference but 6 eggs might come out short in the hydration department.  

 

Elsasquerino's picture
Elsasquerino

Could your eggs have been smaller than usual, 3 eggs isn't a precise measurement as you can imagine those pesky hens haven't considered us baker's and fire out all kinds of sizes. Mini ovens tip sounds a good place to start. Hope you work it out.

meganm1989's picture
meganm1989

I'll try to add a little more milk although I found out the problem was that I added too much yeast.

meganm1989's picture
meganm1989

You know I go between jumbo and large eggs and I don't usually don't have a problem on the smaller batch but perhaps doubling it would cause it to make a difference. I didn't even think about that.

meganm1989's picture
meganm1989

Turns out I added too much yeast. I went back and looked at my measuring spoons and i used tablespoons until teaspoons. It was like a monster growing, it's still growing actually. I baked a small amount of the dough before I do my final bake tonight and the yeast taste was definitely there but I think I can cut down the strong taste with my caramel and pecan glaze. Fingers crossed it works.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

too much yeast is in how fast it ferments AND in your case, it worked like a water sponge.  

I took a teaspoon of yeast and added water until it was wet enough to smear onto a dough.  It took about 4 times the amount of water in volume and a little bit more!  Amazing.

All that yeast would give you no time to bulk, start into shaping right away after getting the hydration corrected and kneaded.   And as you found out, more yeast speeds up everything.  

I did a test once on some rolls, dumped in lots of yeast.  My teenage nephews gobbled up the rolls and said they were the "best."  So you might come out very good on these if you get them proofed and baked early.  Don't be afraid to knock some wind out of the dough a second time if you need to.