The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Recipe for grease to separate bread dough from baking pan

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Recipe for grease to separate bread dough from baking pan

What do you use to separate your bread dough from the baking pan.

I mix lecithin and Canola oil and the bread pops right out.

But my French baker has a secret mix for grease to separate dough from pan. He puts eggs and some other things in the Crisco like mixture.

Do you happen to know what that special mixture is?

Thanks.

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

I use a mix of approx. 50 percent Crisco and 50 percent flour.  Works for me, and better that the commerical spray on bake release I have tried.

suave's picture
suave

Adding some vegetable oil to it makes it softer and easier to brush on pans. 

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

I used to add vegetable oil, 1/3, 1/3, 1/3 and this works great too.  But now I don't brush on, just use my fingers.  One less thing to wash - but of course you have to wash your hand.  My wife used to do something similar, she would coat the pan with Crisco and the dust flour on it.  This works too.   The flour really helps and seem to hold the release on the sides of the loaf pan as you bake.

Some folks like to use rice flour rather than wheat flour but for me that is something extra to get out.  (I do like rice flour for breading fish and meats for frying,)

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

 

That is 1/3, oil, 1/3, flour, and 1/3 Crisco?

Thanks.

 

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

And just close - no precission required.  What looks or feels right.  I would mix a batch and keep in the fridge - keeps well that way.

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Many thanks. 

Up until this time I have used lecithin and vegetable oil, but using Crisco will be a lot easier to get hold of.

I wonder if it really needs to be kept in the refrigerator?

Thanks. 

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

There is really no need to keep a mix of Crisco and flour in the fridge.  I did when I use the Crisco, oil, flour mix.  Just on the safe side of longer shelf life of oil.  We keep Crisco at room temperature and of course flour too.  We use Crisco for other baking too - Carol likes it for pie crust.  Smucker's was able to take the trans-fat out of Crisco a few years back. (Crisco came from France after WW I to replace lard.  For many years it was a P&G product, then they sold it to JM Smucker's - who knew how to remove the trans-fat before they bought the brand, something P&G didn't know how to do.  This I have from a P&G research chemist I was in a class with at John C Campbell Folk School.)

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Wow! Sounds like you know your Crisco!

And yet into the mixture my French baker says he adds egg; I wonder why..oh well.

Thanks.

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Many thanks; I will try that.

I believe my French baker added an egg to it. His mixture looks very like as if with out flour, but maybe I will combine all 3.

Thanks.

 

 

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Many thanks; I will try that.

I believe my French baker added an egg to it. His mixture looks very like as if with out flour, but maybe I will combine all 3.

Thanks.

 

 

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Most grateful for the advice people have offered.

FlyinAggie's picture
FlyinAggie

I live in hot, humid Florida, and Crisco goes bad for me if not kept refrigerated.  If you're a southern  baker, you might want to "keep your cool".  I want to thank those of you who recommended the KD 8000 scale to me.  I finally got one, and it is really, really nice!  Reasonable price, too!  I was not surprised to find that my flour was quite heavy after recent rains, even though I keep it in a tightly sealed canister.  It probably came home from the store heavy.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I mix about 1/4 c oil and about a healthy teaspoon or two of liquid lecithin in a 1/2 pint canning jar. I keep it in the cupboard. I also keep a cheap chipbrush in a plastic bag next to the jar to use as an applicator, so no greasy fingers.I only make enough to go through in about 6 months so it never has a chance to get old. When I make a new batch, I wash out the container and brush and start over.

I usually use oatmeal flakes as a pan release after brushing on the oil/lecithin. It goes well with most of the breads I make but the oats scattered on the pan around a boule tend to burn easily so I brush them away. It is not a problem in a panned loaf.

CountryBoy's picture
CountryBoy

Well that is one way to do it but it is always a hassle getting hold of lecithin; not easy to come by hereabouts.

Crisco a bit easier.

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

PAM