The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Problem with fridge rise on Tartine bread

singermane's picture
singermane

Problem with fridge rise on Tartine bread

Normally, I get great results with the Tartine sourdough recipe. I rose the bread in the fridge for about 17 hours overnight. When I baked it, I had a very close crumb, with a gummy texture. What happened? 

I'm guessing I over proofed it. How long can bread rise in the fridge?

Lechem's picture
Lechem

How much starter and how much bulk ferment at room temp.

The norm is 8-12 hours for the final proof in the fridge. 

singermane's picture
singermane

There was 1 Tblspn of starter in the levain. The levain was 100 g, added to 500 g flour. The bulk ferment was 3.5 hours. I then shaped it and let it rest for 30 minutes. Shaped it again and threw it in the fridge from 17 or so hours. 

Lechem's picture
Lechem

And that becomes your starter. So that is 100g preferment to 500g flour = 30% 'starter'.

3.5 hours sounds about right to complete the bulk ferment.

I would do 8-12 hours in the fridge for the final proof.

singermane's picture
singermane

ok, so 17 overproofed it?

Lechem's picture
Lechem

Try less time. See if that helps.

singermane's picture
singermane

thanks, for the advice and the quick responses 

Lechem's picture
Lechem

And let us know if you've had better success.

My pleasure. 

fupjack's picture
fupjack

I just did a bunch of test batches using the proportions in the first Tartine book, seeing how it integrated (or not) with my day job work schedule.  I don't have my notes here in front of me, but I remember 14 hours being about the limit before quality really suffered, and about 8-10 being the 'sweet spot'.

singermane's picture
singermane

when i flipped the bread into the baking pan, it got stuck to the cloth in the bowl it was proofing in (i guess i didn't flour it enough). so the loaf didn't come out again. i think the loaf lost it's tension, didn't get enough oven spring, and then didn't cook enough because there wasn't enough air in the bread

does that sound feasible?

Lechem's picture
Lechem

Have you thought about lowering the hydration till you get a handle on it then slowly increasing? 

singermane's picture
singermane

maybe. i had success the first time i made it. 

singermane's picture
singermane

im just curious if that theory makes sense

singermane's picture
singermane

(as in my theory about why it didn't cook)

Lechem's picture
Lechem

The longer the dough needs in the oven even if everything goes well. If the dough is very dense it will be I difficult to bake through properly.

singermane's picture
singermane

ok. thanks. makes sense