The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Whole Wheat Bread Flour

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MarionR's picture
MarionR

Whole Wheat Bread Flour

Is there such a thing as whole wheat bread flour?  If yes, what brand do you recommend?  TIA

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Any whole wheat should be fine for bread, although whole wheat pastry flour might not work. Typical protein percentages are 10% for all-purpose, 12% for bread flour, and 14% for whole wheat. You might have to adjust the liquid amount a bit though.

 

In the US, I personally like King Arthur and Bob's Red Mill. In both cases I prefer the organic product lines. However, Bob's has done a better job separating out the nut-free from the nut-contaminated products, so I am tending in that direction for a while.

 

King Arthur does have a nice White Whole Wheat which is milled from a wheat variety bred (no pun intended) to have a less-brown bran. If your bake-ees don't like the somewhat bitter taste of whole wheat this is a good flour to try.

 

HTH.

 

sPh

helend's picture
helend

Where are you MarionR?

 

In UK lots of mills sell great wholewheat bread flour - try internet search and you should find lists quite easily. Bacheldre Mill is great and has a lot of stockists also does rye wholemeal spelt etc. Dove Farm is widely available. To be honest look in bigger supermarkets too Sainsbury and Aitrose stock excellebt organic and artisan flour also try farmers markets.

 

 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 If you can mill your wheat berry's for your whole wheat flour your bread will  taste  many, many times better than any store bought whole wheat flour can do,,,,,

  Unlike white flour the fresher the whole wheat flour the better....

 qahtan

ed minturn's picture
ed minturn

Hi,


 Just starting with milling my own whole wheat flour and baking bread. Can you just use whole wheat flour and not bread flour as a lot of recipes call for. Do you have any recipes.    thanks,  ed

martin's picture
martin

We grind our own Whole Grain Flour each baking day. It goes from the mill into the mixer.  Currently we are using a Demeter Wheat from Australia.

The poet Pam Ayres once said, when describing her home-made wholemeal bread, that it was like 'biting into a cornfield', and that's it – the very best description I've ever come across. A crisp, crunchy crust and then all the flavour of the wholewheat grain – take a bite, close your eyes and you'll know just what she meant. (taken fron Delia Online)

 

Regards,

 

Martin 

www.bakerette-cafe.com

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

Using a Kenwood Chef and the mill attachment, I grind organic wheat berries. It tastes much better the day it is milled - even by a week old, some of the "specialness" is gone. So I feel any shop sold whole wheat must have lost something - still, better than nothing!
Using a wheat called "paragon" this year - it is lovely.

Andrew

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 I also use my Kenwood mill, I some times add about 10% flax seeds to my whole

 wheat berries, most times I do it twice......

 I get organic hard wheat. qahtan  

 There is no comparison in the taste of fresh milled and shop bought....

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Grinding fresh flour is something most artisan bakers at least want to try (I do, but I am not sure how to go about obtaining grain that is certified not to be nut-contaminated), but let's not scare off a first-time wholegrain baker! Flour from a commercial organic supplier is fine for the first months/years of the bread adventure.

 

Humans have had the option of grinding flour at home since the dawn of agriculture, and I think it tells you something that there have been professional millers since about 3 years after that day.

 

sPh

qahtan's picture
qahtan

I don't know what you mean about your grain that is certified not to be nut infested.

 The  organic kernels /berries I buy are "Oak Manor" and are very clean and ready to mill.

 Oak Manor Farms, Ontario, Canada.,,,,, qahtan 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Nuts, both tree nuts and ground nuts, permeate the food supply in North America (and I believe Europe as well). Clearly nut-based foods need nuts in them, but for reasons I suspect are related to food processing technology nuts have also been added to thousands of foods that one would ordinarily think would not contain them.

 

The result of adding nuts to so many food products is that our entire food supply chain is contaminated with nuts. You have no way of knowing whether or not the truck that was used to transport the raw corn from southern Illinois that you bought for milling wasn't used to tranport peanuts last week in Georgia. You can't tell whether or not farmers in areas that border nut-growing regions have been alternating row crops and ground nuts (admittedly this is less likely, but you can't be sure).

 

Significant flour suppliers obtain certifications from their grain suppliers stating whether or not their product is nut-contaminated. They also do nut protein tests on their incoming raw materials. I had a long discussion with a customer service rep from one of the major organic flour suppliers in the US, and the outcome was that if the post-2006 label does not say "nuts or nut fragments" then you can have as much trust in it as you do in anything you don't grow yourself. But I can't find a raw grain supplier that will make the same statement.

 

A friend gave us a box of bakery goods as a thank-you present last month. Almond pastry with almond oil. Instantly fatal to at least one member of my family. She just forgot when she was making her choice of gift. But as Professor Moody says, "Constant vigilance!".

 

sPh

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 I always look through the kernels before milling them and I have not yet found any thing other than wheat kernels, so do you mean that if if last years crop in a particular field was growing peanuts and this year it is growing corn, then that also is contaminated.

                 qahtan 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

> so do you mean that if if last years crop in a particular

> field was growing peanuts and this year it is growing corn,

> then that also is contaminated.

 

It is possible, yes. Nut dust/fragements smaller than the eye can see are quite sufficient to cause an allergic reaction. The product must either have a certified nut-free production chain or be chemically assayed for nut proteins. Or both.

 


I think this will be my last post on this topic for a while. It is important to me (clearly) but I don't want anyone to think that I am turning the blog into the "nut police".

 

sPh

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

My wheat is from an organic cereal farm here in the UK, and as I buy it from the farm direct, it has never left the place! So - no nut contaminants.
But as for other conaminants - I am constantly vigilant! Little field mice are constantly adventurous, little birds hopping about - insects of various sorts....so far, I've found none, but I'd hate to mill anything containing other proteins!

Andrew

aharcup's picture
aharcup

Can you help me to find a source of Organic wheat berries in the UK. I am having a really hard time trying to find a source.

Many Thanks for any help

Andy 

"Difficulties are opportunities to better things; they are stepping stones to greater experience. Perhaps someday you will be thankful for some temporary failure in a particular direction. When one door closes, another alway

BabyBlue's picture
BabyBlue

I am buying organic wheat and other grains from a farm in New Brunswick Canada, called Speerville Mills.  They don't deal in nuts, so I am pretty sure their crop would be nut free.  It is also organic.


I am starting to mill my own. I have a nutrimill on my counter and have been a very proficient bread baker until now...  I don't want to add any white flour to my bread, I want 100% whole wheat.  I also want to maintain a vegan bread, so milk, honey and dough enhancer are out. 


I am wondering if I am milling my flour to the right texture?  Fine or not so fine?  What is best.  Right now, all my bread is flat unless I add 1 TBSP Vital Wheat Gluten per cup of flour.  Any suggestions? 


I am getting a shipment of spelt, rye and red fife wheat this week.  I am very excited, but I would be even more excited if my bread actually would turn out!