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Baking with natural wild yeast water (not sourdough)

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wao's picture
wao

Baking with natural wild yeast water (not sourdough)

Hi, everyone.

I'm new to this site and have a question.

This sled is about capturing wild yeast and bake with it, right?

It seems like people are making sourdough starter and baking sourdough bread.

Is anybody baking non-sourdough with fresh fruit yeast (or dried fruits yeast) like me? 

http://originalyeast.blogspot.com/

This is my blog. I don't know if there are many people out there baking with fresh fruits / dried fruits yeast here...

If you are interested, please leave comment here or at my blog.

I want to have friends who has same interests!

Thanks!

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Yes, wao, I'm very interested in this, I love to ferment things...I make & use kefir on a regular basis & I'm an avid bread baker...I've tried sourdough several times with no real success.  I am so inspired...I've already begun to soak my dried blueberries & cranberries...tomorrow I'll get some raisins...Thanks!   Beth

wao's picture
wao

Hi, Beth.

I am happy to find somebody who is interested in this baking method.

Please buy raisins with no oil coating to obtain good result.

I bet you will find yeast water very cute!

My yeast water is very cute and spoiled. I even talk to it ...

Good Luck! Thanks for the comment.  

 

 

janeburton's picture
janeburton

I realize I'm over a year and a half late in replying to your  post, but I also make and use kefir and it's a great starter for sourdough bread. One and a half cups of kefir to 3 cups flour, proof it 24 hours - that's my recipe.

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

This is interesting.  I've only recently found success (several failures too!) with a sourdough culture which is in itself a fascinating ever shifting balance of lactobacillus, yeast and their byproducts but Wild yeast water sounds fantastic.

 Would I be right in thinking  some of the fruity taste from the soaked ingredients is imparted to the bread? (that would be awesome in the context of fruited panettone  or currant buns for example)

Also I read that the yeast used in japanese breads was traditionally obtained from the fermentation of rice to make sake.  Hmmm...rice yeast...I wonder if it's possible...

 

wao's picture
wao

Hi. Thanks for the comment.

I know, it's not easy to make sourdough with water and flour.

This dried fruits and fresh fruits method does make the yeast water fruity.

If you use natural yeast water only to make your dough and don't put too much butter or other strong flavor ingredients, you can slightly smell strawberry, peach or several other strong flavor fruits from the bread.

You can definitely enjoy crumb color. If you bake with strawberry yeast, you can make purplish color crumb.

About rice yeast.

There are 2 kinds of major rice yeast. I think you are talking about sake yeast (it's called saka-dane in Japanese).  Professional bakers use this yeast (same yeast as what sake makers use to ferment rice to brew sake) to make Japanese red bean paste bread but the yeast is so delicate and hard to control, amateur people cannnot use it.

If you live in Japan or city where many Japanese people live, you might be able to get "sakekasu", stuff you get after squeeze sake from fermetned rice mixture, that works like yeast.

There is one more way to use rice to make yeast. That is when you refresh your yeast water, you can feed cooked rice as your yeast's food because rice contains sugar.

There are some more ways to use rice for baking bread and they all seem fun to experiment.

Do you want to experiment those??? 

 

 

 

 

bshuval's picture
bshuval

I love fermentation fun! Please continue to post your adventures and enlighten us with your interesting methods. Moreover, since I know next to nothing about Japanese breads, I would be delighted to learn more about them.

Inspired by your post, I just started making my own yeast water, using organic sun-dried apricots (unsulphured). They are very sweet, and I hope they will make good yeast water.

Thanks for posting this! 

My bread blog: http://foldingpain.blogspot.com

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Hi, woa...yes, I'm sure I'll think my yeast water is very cute...I am very fond of my kefir grains, I've known them for a long time, it's interesting how we can relate to another living organism!

The water in my cranberry & blueberry mixture is already bubbly, do you think that combination with make good yeast water?

I'll get the raisins (organic without an oil coating) today, thanks for all the good information!

Take care!   Beth

 

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

What health risks are there with this method?

I know with Sourdough there is Leuconstoc and such but what about wildyeast?

You have a small disclaimer at the bottom of your recipe for making wild yeast saying "bake at own risk"

 

Risk of what?

 

TGB 

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

Leuconostic bacteria aren't a health risk, they just don't work "right" and your bread doesn't rise well.  If you keep feeding your sourdough culture, the leuconostic bacteria can't take the acidity and goes away.

 

Sourdough (which the yeast water is not) is a very stable and resilient symbiosis. 

 

Mike

 

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Mike,

I am an overly cautious person and for some reason got in my head that Leuconstoc could make us sick (toxins from it not the bug itself)

I have an enormous amount of respect for those things that need a microscope to be seen. They can break down a fall tree make us well and make us ill.

I must do some more research and perhaps I wont be so afraid of sourdough or wild yeast cultures ;)

 

TGB 

 

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

Sourdough has withstood the test of time, having been in use for between 6,500 and 10,000 years.

 

Sourdough is a symbiotic relationship between yeast and lactobacillus bacteria.  The bacteria produce 50 anti0bacterial compounds that have been identified, and few organisms can surbive the acidity of a sourdough culture.

A healthy sourdough culture is essentially benign.  It makes food more digestible, and I have not heard of people reacting negatively to it.

 

Mike

 

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

I must seem silly to you then :)

 

Still, I think, having a kid made me overly cautious. I wouldnt get on a motorbike now for what happens if something happened and as my husband says......."and what if a meteorite falls from the sky Nadia"

I think this is a bit of a sign to get me to stop stressing over "contaminants"

If Jmonkey can eat the sourdough after their culture grew black mold,(he scraped the mold off and used a little culture from the bottom to make more starter) and not be wandering around seeing purple elephants and or retching.......then I just might be ok ;)

 

At least I think it was Jmonkey...but I might be wrong.

 

 

wao's picture
wao

Hi, the greenbaker.

I put "bake/cook at own risk" sign(s) to all of my cooking sites and blogs.

According to several books that I own about baking natural wild yeast bread, they all say this is a safe way to bake bread but follow your instinct.

If you think the yeast water should not smell like how it smells, discard the water and start again. If you are a baker, you will probably know if the water is good or bad with some miscellaneous germs (I think this is s rare case...though)  Good yeast water smalls like fruity wine.

In my experience, if you use a clean jar (washit with soap and dry in a rack, right out from washer, you can even disinfect by soaking your jar and lid into hot water.) you can get good results. Ah, and wash your hands beforehand  :)

Here is how to make water 

1. Mix dried fruits and water. loosely close the lid. (There is a hot "controversy" about close it tightly or loosely, but I prefer loosely. ..)

2. open the jar once a day (and smile at it! )

3. and be patient

4. You will eventualy see some bubbles. (usually start from some bigger bubbles in one day and  later smaller bubbles.) At this time tighten the jar lid and wait for 2-3 hours and open the jar. You will hear "pshuu..." sound.  Success!

____

FYI: Some books recommend this way. After mixing fruits and water, tightly close tha jar. Open and lightly shake the jar twice a day.

____

Enjoy!

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Wao, 

I think I am going to face some fears and give this a try :)  Sour dough too.

Thanks for getting back to me and for adding your recipe to the thread :)

As ehanner asked...is there a feeding schedule once the yeast water has been established?

I am going down stairs, disinfecting a jam jar, washing my hands (of course *wink* I AM a baker after all and my hands are constanly doughey or under the tap!) 

 

Thanks afain Wao!

 

TGB 

wao's picture
wao

Adding some sugar and/or honey to the mixture from the beginning makes the yeast water bubble up faster and yeild stronger yeast water.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Wao,
Thank you for posting your information on water yeast. I am curious about how you maintain your yeast water. I have a few flour based natural starters that I use to rise my breads and I know how they behave based on a schedule. I see you add fruit which I suspect provides the food for the bacteria. You must also be refilling the jar with water after using some of the liquid. Could you talk about how you feed and what the indications are when you know it is ready to be refreshed please? What about the old fruit?

Thank you,
Eric

wao's picture
wao

Hi, Eric

I have info up on my blog this morning. http://originalyeast.blogspot.com/

I thought it's going to be a long post so I added the info here insted of here.

Sorry to make you to come to my blog...

Hope that would help you.

If you have question, you can post it here or on the blog.

Thank you! Have a nice day:)

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Wao,
It would be more helpful if the thread here contained all of the useful information. It's nice that you keep your blog but people who are reading the thread then have to leave it. 

Could you say which fruit creates the "Fruitiest" flavor in the bread? For example could you tell the difference between using peach and strawberry in a plain white bread, other than the color?

Eric

wao's picture
wao

strawberries.

If you use a lot of crushed fruits instead of whole fruits to make yeast water, you can get ful flavored yeast water.

Also, when you use white flour, less flovourful ingredients (butter, EVoliveoil.. etc) and 100% yeast water (no plain water added when making dough) makes your dough fruity. 

It is not fruity but tea leaf yeast bread smells fantastic, too.

enjoy baking:)

caseyanne's picture
caseyanne

Can you use dried fruit? Or does it all need to be fresh, the raisins confused me.  I love dried cherries, and use them in place of raisins whenever possible. 

wao's picture
wao

Hi, caseyanne

 

You can use both dried fruits and fresh fruits.

I have never tried cherries but I guess it will be beautiful pink yeast water.

Enjoy!

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Hi, Woa...

After reading your information, I began my fruit water with dried blueberries & cranberrries. Bubbles appeared the first day, but then never again.  7 days later, I mixed some of the water with flour, per your instructions.  The next day it looked the same, but by the following day (day 2), it had doubled.  It's still at room temperature and still doubling after stirring it down...so I suppose it's too sour for bread and I should discard it.  I refreshed the original yeast water after I used some, so I suppose it's ready to be used again.  How long should you let the flour & yeast water sit at room temperature before making bread?

Thanks!  Beth

wao's picture
wao

Hi

I think your yeast water was not bubbling enough at the first time..?!

If you think your yeast water is ready now, follow the direction below :)

what you need for pre-fermented dough

 a container with lid (zip-lock container, topperware ...)

' yeast water (bring it to room temperature if you keep it in the refrigerator)

' whole wheat flour

1. pour 80g (3 oz) yeast water in the container (soaked raisins can go into the dough if you prefer)

2. mix in 100g (3.5oz) of whole wheat flour

knead it with spoon or folk for about 3-5minutes.

When it is hot (room temperature80 °F and above), add a tiny bit of salt to avoid over fermentation.

Over fermentation makes your dough very sour.

Cover and let it sit over night. It will doubles-triple.

FYI: 2/16/08, this mixture tripled in 10 hours at room temperature. (77 degreesF)making real dough.(recipe : easy petite roll bread)ingredients 100g=3,5oz , 200g=7oz , 50g=1.75oz'pre-fermented dough, all amount  180g
 'AP flour, bread flour, whole wheat 120g white flour+80g whole wheat
 'salt                      1 teaspoon
 'yeast water             about 50g (room temperature)'water                 about 50-65g = 1.75oz-2.3oz
 sugar, brown or honey               1 tablespoon
☆ Mix all the ingredients in a large bowl.

Knead for 10-20minutes to see some gluten film(jump to other bread making site. see a picturein the middleof the page) . Gluten film does not need to be very thin.
You can use a stand mixer or a bread maker. I use bread maker for kneading.

Place the dough in a bowl and let it sit for 2-6hours, until double in bulk. Time depends on the room temperature and yeast's strength.

In yeast water baking with whole wheat flour, 60-65% water (yeast water+water) in ratio to flour is enough. Also while the dough is rising, the dough is loosen and becomes soft. Please be careful how much water you add. It's easy to add water but difficult (almost inpossible) to remove water from the dough!

☆ After the first rise, take the dough out from the bowl and place it on the flat surface. If the dought is soft and hard to handle, dust some flour.
☆ Divide the dough into 8 small balls. ☆ Let them rest for 15minutes under the damp cloth.☆ Lightly smash each dough and round it again.☆ Let the dough rise again for 2-2.5 hours under damp cloth. Until doubles in bulk.

Preheat oven 450 degrees. Heat a cookie sheet in the oven. Move the dough onto the sheet.Slash the top of the dough with wet knife. Mist the dough with water. Also mist inside the oven.
Bake dough for 15-16minutes at 400 degrees. (long shaped bread in the picture should be baked for 20minutes.)

FYI: 2/17/2008Room temp. 26 degreesC (77DegreeF). First rise 2 hours, second rise 2hours.
(you can see pictures here)http://originalyeast.blogspot.com/
wao's picture
wao

*If your water is not bubbling enough, you can add 3tbsp of apple juice as yeasts' food. This works very well for energizing your water and add some flavor to your yeast water.

* Once you get bubbling yeast water and want to make another bottle of yeast water quick, you can start new yeast water with water and fruits and 1-2 tbsp of your already made yeast water. This method will help you making another jar of yeast water quick.

*Tomato and black tea yeast water is relatively quick to make.

Enjoy :)

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Hi, woa...so, if I want to make the tea yeast water, I would use 3-4 tablespoons loose-leaf  black tea, plain water, and 1 - 2 tablespoons of my already made yeast water?  Does that sound about right?  For the tomato, do you use fresh tomato?

Thank you, for all your help!   Beth

P.S. Last night, I mixed another preferment with my apple & cherry yeast water...so far there's no activity...my house is only 60 degrees at night & when I'm gone to work, etc....so I think that's a big factor... 

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Beth,

When you make some bread with your yeast water I would LOVE to see the results.

I am intrigued with all this but havent yet started and did a google search on it and came up with naught.  So seeing anothers experience would be fantastic!

 

TGB

More than just bread blog.

http://holistichedonist.wordpress.com/

 

 

wao's picture
wao

Hi Beth,

Yeah, that's very true! I could not find any web sites or even a comment about this method of baking in english.

I think raisin yeast water is commonly used among professional bakers in Europe and Asia(many many Japanese house wives' HPs/blogs are specifically about how to enjoy with yeast water baking!) .

I think sourdough baking is the most popular way of baking with natural yeast in this country so other methods have not beed introduced??

I don't know... but this is a good way of feeling 4 seasons by choosing favorite ripe fruits to make yeast water and bake. 

Professionals use raisins year round because raisin is available anytime of the year, but since we are home bakers, we can enjoy any kinds of fruits and vegetables when it's in season! Yay! 

Have a great day!

wao's picture
wao

To make basic tea yeast water, you need,

*1 table spoon loose black tea leaf

*1 cup of plain water 

*1 table spoon honey

 mix them together and wait for few days.

Since you already have some yeast water, you could add 1-2tbsp already made yeast water to this mixture to get even faster result.

   About tomato yeast, yes, use fresh tomato.

Cut up a tomato into pieces and put them in a jar with water.

you can get faster result when you use more fruits/veg.

like, 'fruits/veg : water = 1:2' (weight ratio)

I don't know if you want to visit other website from here but since I do not have any pictures of tomato yeast, you can see it here.(this is a Japanese website so you might not read them but pictures might help you :)

http://arisukekoubou.tea-nifty.com/photos/tomato/index.html

(tomato yeast step by step, this person made focaccias with this yeast water, click pics to see bigger pictures))

 http://weekly.yahoo.co.jp/13/countrylife/pan_handmade1.html

(some different kinds of fruits, herb and veg yeast water on page 1. On page 2, you can see 2 different kinds of bread making processes.)

Hope these sites could help you.

 

You can make dough in cool environment. It takes time. maybe up to 12 hours.

To find out if your yeast water is working or not, you can mix a tbsp of yeast water and 1.5 tbsp of ww flour in a small container, cover it and let it sit for a night(5-6hours at warm place like on top of refrigerator)) and see if some bubbles come on the surface.

Once you get the prefermented dough, you can save it in the refregerator for later baking as well as using it rightaway. (these are called pre-fermented dough method. strong and stable fermentation. less yeast water flovar))

You can even do "straight method". Mix all the bread dough ingredients and go for 1st rise. (6-12hours) Give the dough a light punch, ( rise, )shape, rise then bake. Takes longer time but you get flovorful bread.

I think prefermented dough method is easier to get good result but once you get the idea of baking with yeast water, you will be able to pick a method that suite your schedule and life style~! :)

Enjoy!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

If you ever saw tea drying, you would do as the Chinese do.  Rinse the tea under cold water first before ever using it.

Mini O

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Ok, wao, I mixed-up my tea yeast water...I found (at the health food store) some apricot tea, it's black tea with apricot blossoms mixed in, it's extremely fragrant, I used that for my tea yeast water (they didn't have plain black tea).

My preferment from this morning is slightly airy but has not expanded yet...now that I'm home & the house is warmer, I think it'll take-off...should I wait until it doubles to mix the bread dough?

I am so excited to see the end result, the bread, from this venture...and yes, greenbaker, I'll try to post a pic...

woa, can you use yeast water for anything other than bread?  It reminds me of rejuvelac, which is a tonic made from fermented, sprouted wheat berries...

Take care!   Beth

bakerb's picture
bakerb

woa...I mixed-up my tea yeast water about 2 hours ago and it's already bubbly, yippee...I did use some of my existing fruit yeast water...is that why it's so fast?

My preferment is still rather listless (I can see bubbles in the dough on the side of the container, so I think it's OK, it just needs time so I'll mix it before I go to work in the morning...

Have a good night!  Beth 

wao's picture
wao

Sorry for my late response.

Yeah, I geuss tea is already fermented food so it's fast to bubble up and also because of your already made yeast water.

If you still don't get good result from your original preferment then try tea yeast water.  You might be able to get good dough.

  

 

Susan's picture
Susan

Well, this was more fermentation fun!

Raisin-Water Rolls

Susan from San Diego

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Those look perfect Susan. Do they exhibit any of the qualities of the yeast or are they unique in any way in the crumb? Did they get the magic bowl treatment?

So many questions!!

Eric

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Wow Susan!

What steps did you take to get these? They look great!

Did you use the same recipe on WAO's website?

How do they taste? How did the dough behave?

SOrry for the Q's but I am so curious! 

 

TGB

More than just bread blog.

http://holistichedonist.wordpress.com/

 

 

Susan's picture
Susan

TGB and Eric,

Thanks for your kind words.

Nothing really special to report. The water sat for 6 days, then I tried a preferment which didn't do much; I threw it out. So I added a teaspoon of sugar to the rest of the water mix and left it overnight. Made yet another preferment, which rose more than twice its bulk overnight. Then used the preferment to make the dough, as in the recipe.

The dough was a little slow, but I suspect that with multiple feeding cycles and warmer weather on the way, the rise will quicken, same as SD. I used Wao's roll recipe to the letter, which called for more WW than white flour, so the crumb was fairly tight. Next time I'll use more water to loosen the crumb a bit. That's not unusual here; the air is dry and I often have to add more water to a recipe. In retrospect, I should have started with the higher end of the recipe's water suggestion.

Tastes like bread! The dough was dough. The rolls puffed up nicely in the oven, as you can see.

Didn't use the Magic Bowl, Eric. Just a water spray on the rolls before I popped them in the oven.

Susan from San Diego

bshuval's picture
bshuval

I made apricot water that sat on the counter for a week. I mixed it with flour last night, just like wao explained (80g water to 100g WW flour). I let it stand on the counter overnight. The mixture did not rise much (if at all), and did not get a nice fermented odour. However, when I lifted the dough, it did exhibit signs of fermentation, so something *is* happening there. 

Anyhow, I added a dollop of honey to my apricot water, shook the jar really well, and I'll try again soon.

Wao, I looked at the links you gave us (the ones in Japanese). It seems like there are quite a few books regarding "yeast water". Do you have some more information for us regarding the origins of this method, etc.  

My bread blog: http://foldingpain.blogspot.com

wao's picture
wao

I went to the Japanese book store and looked for informtaion about this method's history but I could not find any good description.

One of the books stated that this is the one of the oldest method of baking bread.

Probably in a process of wine making, somebody experimented with bread dough or accidentaly mixed wine mixture with flour or something. Similar to how sourdough mothod was invented or found.

In eastern Europe, it is very common to use pine tree leaves to make yeast water and bake with it.

In China, professional "mantou"(white steamed buns) makers use "roumen"(non-sour wheat preferment) that is inherited to next generation for many many years.

I don't know if this kind of info is what you wanted to know...

If you have question (and if I could answer it...) I'm glad to share info with you, bshuvel. I visited your blog and I saw some bread pics! yummy~!

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Wow really?

I am gobsmacked. Waos bread looks awesome, but I kind of felt a bit disbelieving. That it was THAT easy to harvest yeast. I thought there had to be a trick to it.

Thats pretty amazing.

Self sufficiency here we come! Sour dough and ordinary yeast bread can be made with out the commecrial companies "help" I have thought for a long time about how one would go about catching yeast that wasnt sour.

Thanks for replying Susan. 

Do you plan to use the yeast water more often? Or are you happy to use instant (etc) yeast?

 

TGB

More than just bread blog.

http://holistichedonist.wordpress.com/

 

 

Susan's picture
Susan

TGB, I also prefer not being tied to buying commercial yeast. Not sure why, as I am not a survivalist by any stretch of the imagination. I can't remember the last time I bought a loaf of bread, tho, and anything that's not made with sd starter tastes a bit strange to me now. There is a bag of ADY here, in the freezer, but really, I use only sd starter to make our daily bread. I'll certainly explore the fruit-water yeast more, 'cause it's fun. After ruminating on the water yeast, it shouldn't have been a surprise that it made the dough rise, but it was!

I've also begun making my own yogurt, using kefir to inoculate each 6-cup batch. Works beautifully. Hence the reference to needing a cow...that's a joke, don't any of you good people send me a cow! Or a goat! I live in the city and the city fathers wouldn't take kindly to livestock.

I do wonder how many of the 10 good 'bugs' in the kefir manage to multiply in the yogurt. Most yogurts in the States have just two bugs, some have up to six. Gotta get BillW interested in yogurt-making so he'll figure out all the intricacies!

You made reference to being concerned about Leuconostoc a while back. I found it interesting that the kefir I buy has Leuconostoc cremoris listed on the label!

Susan from San Diego

wao's picture
wao

Hi, SUsan.

Looks yummy~Thanks for trying my recipe.

Yes, ,,I too prefer baking with yeast water.

Its flovor, crumb and crust....different from IDY bread.

Ah, I think you can make yogurt yeast water with your new yogurt~!

Enjoy.

 

 

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Hi, wao...yesterday I baked my first wild yeast dough, I decided to make a loaf instead of rolls...it turned out fantastic, beautiful crust and crumb, large holes and very delicious...I took pictures, but I don't know how to shrink them so I can post them, yes, I know I've done it before ( http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5872/b%E2%80%99s-five-layer-hidden-focaccia ), but a friend actually did it for me. 

Today I mixed-up dough using wild yeast tea water, it smells wonderful.  I refrigerated it & I'll bake it tomorrow night, because I want to take the loaf to work Tuesday.  I refrigerated the first dough, also...it worked fine, just FYI.

I'm looking forward to the summer for fresh tomatoes so I can collect their yeast & try it.

I am so pleased and awed by the method, and I want to thank you again, wao, for this original post and all your subsequent help!  I'll keep a watch on your site for more of your ideas & methods.

Take care!  Beth

wao's picture
wao

Yay!

It seems like you got a wonderful result from your original yeast.

I am very happy to see people trying and succeed:)

(yeah, some not-so-good results might occur time to time but that's ok, right?!)

You are managing time by using refrigerator, wonderful:)

 Is the refrigerator fermented dough  slightly more sour than non-refrigerated dough? I've heard that before so I'm curious..

You can shrink pictures easily here online if you are interested. 

http://www.shrinkpictures.com/

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I just peeled a kiwi, a kumquat, what was left of a few Chinese dates and a squirt of honey with water into a jar.  Rather pretty.  We will see what happens in a week. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

After 3 days it was already fermenting and smelling great! Added a little more water and stirred it up. Cool!

On the 4th day I added some flour to some of the liquid and let it stand overnight.

On day 5, there were bubbles and an interesting sweet smell to the dough, also it was fermenting. Strained the yeast water and parked it into the fridge. Dumped the fruit -- starting to look questionable.

Today I decided to make a dough from the yeast water. Plan to bake in the morning.

 Day 3

Aliens landing from not far away: Day 3

 cooled down cool yeasty beasties / today

Aliens after 24 hr. captivity in cool confinement: Day6

(afraid to taste it but it smells yeasty)

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 40% rye above   Yeast water spelt below

yeast water bread: 40% rye above Yeast water spelt below

 

I made a white wheat/spelt loaf following the directions for a small loaf only one small change, used only water for additional liquid and not 50/50 yeast water.

I was prepared for a long first proof, and I eventually shaped my little loaf and let it rise for a final proof. As I uncovered it I kept smelling essents of Soya sauce, strange. I baked it in a covered glass casserole for 35 min in a cold oven with convection, last 5 min open to crispen the crust.

The dough was white as a sheet when it went in and it came out brown, but when I cut open the loaf ....it is a fantastic rich orange brown ! WOW! I've got to try this with my rye flour and see if I can't get that extra dark rich brown colour. (if white bread comes out brown, what will the rye look like?) The loaf is very moist and has a soft crust and not sour. I've got yeast water and a wheat starter going.

Mini O

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Very interesting outcome MiniO. You are the explorer. Yes, a three Musketeers tip of the hat to you.

Eric

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

After about a week in the fridge, I checked on my yeast water, sitting naked and turning into wine (Baccus would be proud) and thought to myself, "this stuff needs feeding. Now what?"

So I tasted it....not bad... I could sit back with over-ripe yeast water a fancy cocktail glass, grapes in my hair (not thinking about any headache to come) and put my elves to work dancing and making merry music but reality set in and I stirred it up, kept a tablespoon and added about 1/2 c (125ml) water and 6 ripe clean grapes. I did a good job of popping them first between my fingers and threw them in, covered them and back into the fridge. It's been about another week, and time to experiment again... No mold here. Smells like it's in a stage between mature sd and wine. Before I use i, I will feed it again and leave it out at room temp for about 8 hours.

Mini O

Susan's picture
Susan

You've taken the yeast-water concept and made it your own.  The bread looks wonderful! 

Susan from San Diego

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I took that week old squishy grape yeast water and after feeding it, did not dump it but mixed it 80ml to 100g spelt flour, and let it sit out (15°c) overnight, then I mixed it into a batch of cinn rolls adding 1/2 the yeast. I let it ferment and made my rolls. To make a long story short, I baked the cinn rolls on Monday evening and they are still edible. Normally they tend to dry out after a few days, but these are surprisingly soft. A big plus point for normal storage.

Thanks 

Mini O 

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Hi, wao...I don't know if the bread was more sour from the refrigeration, because I've only tasted the one loaf...it was not sour and the flavor was delicious, and it was so moist!

Thanks for the link for the pictures, I'll try to work my way through it.

Take care!  Beth

bakerb's picture
bakerb

OK, wao...here goes, thanks to you I think I did it:

wild yeast breadwild yeast breadloafloafcrumbcrumb

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Hi, wao...

tea yeast water doughtea yeast water loaftea yeast water loaftea yeast water crumbtea yeast water crumb yeast water dough

THANKS, AGAIN, WAO!   Beth

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

...Wow!

I've put off doing the 'wild yeast water' thing for a while now...but after seeing that I am definitely several steps closer to taking the plunge.

Are those bits of tea leaf that i see in the bread, Beth?  Please let us know about the taste.  I'm fascinated! 

Thanks Beth, Thanks Wao

 

wao's picture
wao

Hi, Beth. Your bread looks good!!

I like how your bread's crumb looks. I want to taste it ☆☆

 

oday I too baked something.

I used apple+raisin+apricot+apple juice yeast water.

It will be my breakdast tommrow :)

bakerb's picture
bakerb

foolishpoolish...don't hesitate, it is so fun and rewarding, because there's that little side of you that can't believe this could actually work, so when you get, and actually eat your bread, it's like WOW, this is amazing...the taste is subtlety different than commercial yeasted or sourdough, maybe kind of fruity, but it really is indescribable, closer to sourdough, but milder...very delicious and amazingly moist! 

I have such a profound respect for nature, because she provides so much, some, probably most is not obvious...like yeast water!

wao, I'd like to see your bread, you're maybe eating it right about now, or will be soon. Last night I started dried fig yeast water, it's already bubbly...thanks again for everything!   Beth

 

 

wao's picture
wao

You are making so many kinds of yeastwater now!

I used to have many jars too. It was fun.

Here is the picture of sweet bread from yesterday. 

sweetsweet

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Thats it, 

I am definitely going to try this.......as soon as I purchase more dried fruit.

What would you say works the best?

 

This is fascinating! 

 

TGB

More than just bread blog.

http://holistichedonist.wordpress.com/

 

 

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Hi, TGB...for me, it was the tea yeast water...that seemed to be the most active and the quickest...I also made raisin, fresh apple with dried cherry, and dried blueberry & cranberry...I have dried fig growing right now...I remember wao said raisins work the best....they all worked good for me...IT'S SO AMAZING, YOU'VE GOT TO TRY IT!

P.S. did you wear-out your new machine yet?...isn't it great????

Yes, that is bits of black tea in the dough...!

Take care!   Beth

bakerb's picture
bakerb

Wao, is it OK to leave the original fruit in the yeast water, it won't rot, will it?  It still smells wonderful.  Every few days I add a drop of honey and a few dried blueberries, I guess it's still OK...I want to use it for leavening some old recipes, instead of yeast...think it'll work?   Take care!   Beth

wao's picture
wao

Sorry for the late response (I took 2 week off from work and went to small islands..)

Anyway, I usually keep my fruits in my jar and keep the jar in the refregirator.

Never got rotten fruits...so far...(maximum for 2 months)

You can replace commercial yeast with natural yeast water but the texture of the bread might change.

wildfire39's picture
wildfire39

Hi Wao!  I'm glad I found this thread.

 About 2 weeks ago, I bought this Japanese bread book.  It was a home bread baking book by this Japanese woman called Chibichef (that's her blog title).  What caught my attention was the novel method of coming up with a starter using fruits...wild yeast water, as what I've found out it's called from this thread.

I struggle with my Japanese, and I tried making my own starter following the book's instructions as best as I could.  What's odd is, she instructs you to let your raisin-water mixture sit for 10 days at room temperature.  After two days, I saw that there were slight bubbles on top.  Not as much bubbles as in the picture of the book, but they were there.  After letting it ferment to 10 days, the bubbles disappeared completely and I only got molds.  I threw it out.

I think the problem was the raisins...They were sitting in the bottom drawer of my refrigerator...might have been there for two years already!  The yeast might have been dead.  Is it alright to use refrigerated raisins to make the starter?

Would you happen to be familiar with the Natural Yeast Breads they sell at Mitsuwa?  They're these nice, round fluffly pillows with streaks of whatever they're flavored with throughout the crumb.  They're super soft and I'm obsessed with them.  Are these Natural Yeast Breads made with a yeast water starter? Or does it refer to sake brewer's yeast?

I have a lot of questions, since my current obsession is Japanese breads.  Have you tried  making bread with sake brewer's yeast?  Also, I've come across this type of yeast called Hoshino.  I struggle with Japanese, and all the information I could find on Hoshino is in Japanese.  Could you please do me the favor of clarifying what Hoshino is, if you're familiar with it? (I'm certain you are)

Thanks much!!!

 Anne

wao's picture
wao

hello.

@ you can use old raisins but if it is too old....i can't guarantee.

@ for some reason, if raisins do not work for you (or your place), you can alwawys use fresh grape, apple or dried fig.

@ hoshino tennen koubo is a kind of natural yeast that is commercially made. (developped by Mr.Hoshino)

@ Do you have hoshino koubo?? if you have it, mix the powder with water. powder:water=1:2. Let is sit at the 'warm' place for 1.5day.  (doubles in a day and settles down later)

@ use a tblsp of mixture with 300g flour (yieald about 1lb loaf bread) and water and your favorite ingredients.

@ punching down may give you better bread.

@ keep the mixture in refrigerator. good for 1-2 weeks.

@ I am guessing that you are talking about individually packed round bread with chocolate or custard cream weaved in? I have no idea which yeast they use because they only list "natural yeast" as ingredients. Could be hoshino.

  ____

I went to see the Japanese bread today. The packaging said "We use brown rice yeast".

Atropine's picture
Atropine

Ok, here is a dumb question...

 

If the yeast water is not used to leaven the bread, is it just for flavoring?  What does the fruited yeast water bring to the bread?

 

IOW, why do it? :-)  It sounds fascinating, but wondering what the point is exactly.  If you want the flavor of the fruit, could you not just squeeze the fruit and put a bit of the juice in the loaf?  Or is there something else?

 

Thanks!

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

The yeast water DOES leaven the bread - that's the neat thing!

I've still not tried it yet although I intend to one day soon - still have a lot of experimenting with sourdough on the cards first.

I've been reading about traditional italian natural yeast methods and was interested to find that yeast water (just fruit + water left to ferment) is used as a method to capture yeast (before developing further microorganisms in a sourdough-style using a flour+water based feeding process).

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

And they were Great! I just mixed yeast water and flour to make pancaky thick dough and let it sit about 6 hours at 75°F Made enough for 12 muffins or 2 cups. Covered it and it just perked away and I stirred it maybe three times. Didn't rise much. Mixed the recipe when the mixture started to smell sour.   In the oven they really popped and one had a baby muffin grow out on the side!  That's power!  I'm a muffin midwife!  Oh, and they were elderberry muffins this time. Made them this afternoon for coffee but most of them went off with the college kids.  Literally steaming out the door.

I took the scant tablespoon of yeast water that was left and simply whipped in about 3/4 c. water and the guts from two very ripe kiwis and a teaspoon honey. Covered it and put it back into the fridge. It waits up to a week or more for me to use it. I like the idea of adding an acidic fruit, just seems logical.


Mini O'muffin

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

And that is what has me hooked.  Got a brand new lactose intolerant in the family and she can tolerate breads and such made from yeast water.  I do have to watch which fruits I use.  Breads, rolls, muffins, stay moist a long, long time.  I got a feeling that when 

Thank you wao,  excellent idea to post!   Can't thank you enough!

Mini O

flredneckgirl's picture
flredneckgirl

Hi  ...


This may sound like a really stupid question ... after your done making yeast water how do you use it in a recipe ?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

This link sounds like yeast water to me. Just appeared in Medical News Today.  Susan from San Diego put me onto it.


Does renaming it "biotransformed" make it a new idea?


http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/162716.php


"A toast (lift up your glass, please) to Grandma's Blueberry wine!"


Mini O Bio

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Hi,


my water yeast is working perfectly, but I have some doubts.


1) how can I protect it from mould? I added 2 tablespoons of whey, will it suffice?


2) what kind of critters are contained in the water yeast? Surely the usual baker's yeast (caerevisiae saccaromiceti) is there, but what else? Are there fungi? Lactobacilli?


P.S. the coloring effect on bread is really amazing! I never made such a colored bread before ;-)


Thanks,


  Nico


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

One way to protect it from mold/mould is to use it, or strain and refrigerate using it within a few days.  Feed just a little of the yeast water adding more water and unmouldy fruit and/or skins (or honey) to keep it going.  Keep equipment clean and containers loosely covered to keep out flies and bugs, glass lid, or plastic with a rubber band work well. 


I don't know about whey so I can't answer.  Nor do I know which beasties (there could be quite a few or a symbiotic group that) are raising and flavoring my bread, but it sure is fun and interesting.  It wouldn't surprise me if the method presents an opportunity for water kefir to grow so watch your strainer if you're interested.


Mini

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Thanks for you answers!


The bread I made yesterday didn't have any sourness, but it also lacked any flavor. Does the water yeast take time to develop the fruity flavor?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

don't give off any flavours and so I stressed that too much.  Sorry.  The softness of the crumb is a major influence and the colors.   This isn't sourdough so don't expect much sour.  The next step of combining with flour would make a bigger flavour difference.  And I suppose over time the flour fed starter will get sour. 


Reading back up the threads, I had forgotten I turned mine into a spelt sourdough starter eventually.  That in turn got mixed into my Austrian starter or vice-versa.  Whether or not drinking my bubbly yeast water influenced that decision I cannot say.


Mini

sfoster's picture
sfoster

OK, I started my yeast with raisins and it was doing well. I used half my water to make bread but it never doubled in size. I cooked it anyway, it was good, but very heavy.  Since then, I have filled my jar up with boiled then cooled water, and started over with new raisins.  After a couple days it was bubbly so I ran the water through a coffee filter removing all the raisins.  Since then, I have been feeding it about 1/2 tsp. of honey every other day.  It has kept bubbling constantly with little tiny bubbles for the last 2 weeks keeping it at room temperature.  I plan on making my bread tomorrow if I have time.  I'll post my results!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

like a tablespoon and feed it. 

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Hi,
my water yeast rises bread, but it takes ages. In comparison my sourdough is a real speed demon. Will it get faster over time?

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I am fascinated with this concept and just made some grape jam from concord grapes I picked at my daughters new house so I have left-over seeds,skin remnants from milling the grapes.I am using a few tablesppons in about a pint of water to see what develops. I assume I'll get a light pink/lavender color to the crumb og the bread?


I love the peachy and orange color on MiniOven's loaf.So, what fruits will produce what colors? Does it depend on the amount of fruit pulp incorporated or is it all strained out?


Fun!

Joyce@Boston's picture
Joyce@Boston

Does anyone know where can I get the Hoshino Natural Leaven on line or in US?


 


 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hello, Joyce


You may already get " Hoshino Narual Leaven" somewhere, or here


http://en.item.rakuten.com/kashizairyo/yeast-81389/


I leave this link for other members of TFL who are interested in.


Beste wishes,


Akiko

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Hello Akiko, I came across this website yesterday while I was in the office and was very pleased that they could also communicate in English. I recently bought a recipe book that also introudces the use of Hoshino Natural Leaven so I was very happy that I succeeded in placing an order and rec'd an acknowledgement from Rakuten. However, not long afterwards, they sent me an e-mail to say that unfortunately they do not ship this product overseas. I was really quite disappointed. I don't know the reason for this because most of the message was in Japanese. Anyway I have asked a colleague in my TYO office to order this for me and I'll be getting the yeast at the end of the month. They even do a natural yeast using grapes and recommend using this yeast for artisan or "hard" breads as translated by my colleague in TYO. I'm really looking forward to workign with this yeast. Judy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 I am sorry for your trouble, Judy.

I didn't know that the link that I left above doesn't work in English.  Thank you for letting me know about the fact, and I also glad that you are able to get Hoshino soon.  I have never tried it but many Japanese home bakers are very pleased with it.  

P.S Congratulation for your yeast water. I just saw your test levain was suceeded.

Best wishes,

Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I am sorry for everybody including Judy who tried to buy the yeast from the link that I left above. We can't get the hoshino natural yeast because he doesn't ship overseas, either export . He sells it in Japan only.

I asked the Hoshino natural yeast company if the overseas delivery is available.

Best wishes,

Akiko

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Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

comes from raised levels of vitamin C, a known bread enhancer.  Fermented fruit and vegetables have higher amounts of Vit C than their raw equivalents.  :)

Mariemamman's picture
Mariemamman

Hello everyone!


 


I bake using wild yeast as the europeans do. I'm from Sweden myself and here there is a revolution in bread baking. Sourdough is used all around. But I prefer my liquid wild yeast.


I have only tried starting it with organic raisins and organic apricots. If you use apricots, it has to be the brown orgnaic ones. The yellow ones have been treated with sulpuric acid which destroys the natural wild yeast that exists in dried fruit. I prefer apricots since it seems to have more power in the yeast than the raisins. It works every time.


I use a glass jar with a lid. Put in the apricots and pour some water on it. In Sweden we don't have any clorine in our water so I use tapwater. I also put in some honey or a little bit of sugar.


I then place the yar in my oven with the oven lamp on. This serves 2 purposes. First: it keeps the heat up a bit so the fermentation process works well. Second: I see it every day wich helps me remenber it.


I don't keep the lid strapped on completely. There is so much power in the fermentation process. I have seem picture proof of a kitchen absolutely sprayed in yeast after the lid was opened after a five days. The yeast even traveled into the living room, 15 feet away where it sprayed down the new white couch!


I also shake the jar ones a day.


In my lampwarm oven it takes about 5 days to get a finished product. I then press out all the liquid from the apricots and pour it in a bottle. Keeps unfed in the fridge for about 2 months. I don't like to have to feed my yeast, that's why I don't use sourdough. I keep forgetting it...


I save the apricots in the jar (in the fridge) and later use them in a great levain bread combined with almonds.


If you are interested in baking with it the european way, let me know. We have a very famous baker here called Jan Hedh. He introduced liquid wild yeast to Sweden translated from french and italian artisan bakerys.


 


Keep baking!


Mariemamman

Mariemamman's picture
Mariemamman

I'm not really sure what you english speaking people mean by this. To me it sound as if you are hunting it in the air and trying to capture it in the sour dough or the fruit yeast.


I have learned thet the yeast is in the organic fruit, berries or vegetables. In the dried ones it is just resting a bit. By adding water and perhaps something sweet and putting it in a warm place you make a good environment for it to start growing.


But perhaps it is just the language barrier.


Please let me know about the capturing part.


 


Thank you


Mariemamman

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hello  Mariemamman,


Your apricot yeast water sounds great.  Do you have any your favorite recipes using your apricot yeast ?   I will be interested in them :)   I haven't tried apricot yeast water yet.   Thank you for the information.  I will look for organic apricots to try it out.


I love raisin yeast water!  I also like banana yeast, too. 


Happy baking,


Akiko


 

Mariemamman's picture
Mariemamman

Levain bread is made in several steps called different names to keep the stages apart.


 


THE MOTHER (step 1)


60 g (2,1 oz) wheat flour (high protein)


40 g (1,4 oz) liquid wild yeast (other sorts than apricot works fine as well)


20 g (0,7 oz) water


 


In the morning (or evening) combine the ingredients in a glass bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let sit in the oven with the oven lamp on (or in another place that is warmer than room temperature) over the day (or night). Now it is a Mother.


 


THE CHEF


60 g (2,1 oz) wheat flour (high protein)


50 g (1,7 oz)water


 


Add this to The Mother, cover and put in the warm place for the night (or the day). Now it is The Chef. You can store the Chef (or a piece of it) in the fridge in a floured kitchen towel, loosely wrapped. It keeps for up till 2 weeks. When you want to bake, just take it from here and go on making the levain. But remember to weigh it and change the amounts according to how much it is. The whole Chef is 230 g (about 8 oz).


 


THE LEVAIN


1050 g (37 oz)wheat flour (high protein)


700 g (24,5 oz) water


 


Now you need a much bigger bowl. Add these ingredients to The Chef. Lumpy is fine. Cover and put it in the warm place over the day (or the night). Now it is The Levain (predough). The Levain (or part of it) can be stored in a covered bowl in the fridge for a week. The whole Levain should weigh 1980 g (about 70 oz).


 


THE LEVAIN BREAD


 


950 g (33,5 oz) wheat flour (high protein)


800 g (28 oz)levain


550 g (19 oz)lukewarm water


30 g (1 oz) salt


 


Work everything but the salt in a machine for 13 minutes on low speed. Throw in the salt and work it for 5 minutes  on higher speed. Put the dough in a well oiled big bowl or box with a lid. Let it rise in the fridge over night (or day) OR in a warm place for about 3 hours. You can fold it together a couple of times if you want to. 


 


When tho dough is finished and ready to bake with, do as you like. Bake it into long loaves, round breads risen in baskets or something else.


 


You can either let it rise in a warm place or the fridge over the day (or night).


 


Bake it in a very hot oven but lower the heat after you put the bread in. Keep it uncovered when cooling on a bread rack. 


 


OPTIONS:


ALMOND AND APRICOT LEVAIN


Use some of the apricots and almonds, maybe a cup of each and put it in with the other ingredients. Bake as usual. This bread is absolutely wonderful with Brie.


 


You can use Levain for any bread, experiment with it. A sourdough with rye flour works really well but exchange the sourdough for Levain instead. You need more Levain though.


 


Another bread I make is with half Levain, half flour. Good when you have an odd amount of Levain left. Works really fine. 


 


Go play with it, it is really fun!


 


Mariemamman

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Mariemamman


I am very pleased with the recipe that you posted above.  I think that I make it once a week since I started it.


Today, I use only white flour because I wanted to make like Hamelman's Pain au levain. Unfortunetely, I didn't have time to have a bench time to shape from preshape so that the crumb is little bad. But It is very tasty!  I feel like that I make your bread using sourdough culture that is not too sour.  I just taste a pinch of sour  in the bread that I really like. I didn't S&F because my family likes softer crumb.



I gave one of two to our neighbor. They are so happy. 


Thank you, Mariemamman


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you for your recipe!!


It sounds very good, Mariemamman.  I will try it!!!


Happy baking,


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I tried your loaf twice.  But I failed the first one because I overproofed the dough on the final day because I forgot the dough completely while it was at bulk fermentation.  When I realized that I had to preshape the dough, it was deflated already.


The second one was successful.  I made the dough from step1 to step 3 within a day because the dough was ready.( it rose almost 2.5 times in bulk) I was also afraid of the dough getting sour.. Is it sour if I follow your step?  I put some seeds and capers in it with interest. I also added oil a little bit. I like the crumb and It is really a great method! Thank you, Mariemamman. :)



I toasted it and ate it with butter.. YUM!


Happy baking,


Akiko


 

ljdahl's picture
ljdahl

Great yeast water - I've been working on mine now for almost 3 weeks and we make fresh baguettes with the dough every few days.  I found that by saving a bit of yeast water and adding it to the next batch, it bubbles within hours and I can use it by the next day.

love-breadin''s picture
love-breadin'

I have never tried adding to the last little bit of yeast water.  Do you add fresh fruit as well? 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of YW with 6 pieces of the old fruit (mine is apple) and put it in a new container with a new diced and peeled 1/2 apple.  I add 1 T of honey and 1/2 tsp of sugar and then fill the 18 oz peanut butter jar (that I store it in) 3/4 full.  I shake it every hour for 4 hours and into the fridge it goes.  In two days you have new batch readry to go.

love-breadin''s picture
love-breadin'

Thank you for the helpful tip.  Sure beats waiting for 5-7 days for the yeast water to ferment. 

How many times can this be followed up on the original mix? 

cecile cua's picture
cecile cua

hello wao,

i do use fruit water yeast in baking (not as sourdough).  I have tried apple, grapes, cranberries and pineapple.  so far, the pineapple mature pretty faster than the rest of the above mentioned fruit.  the technique i used was to scoop the yeast and mix it with the sugar and water as originally called for in the bread recipe.  when it becomes active (an hour or so), then this is the time i add the mixture into the flour and other ingredients (the dough rise faster this way) instead of adding the yeast alone to the flour mixture which would takes hours for the dough to rise.  you may check my blog "Touchy Craft- How to make Natural Yeast from Fresh Fruit".

cecile


love-breadin''s picture
love-breadin'

hi everyone,

New to this, and am so excited!

Problem:  mixed my 1 cup yeast water to 1/2 cup whole wheat flour and let stand til foamy...

I couldn't get to it right away and it went back to it's beginning form...

can I still use it?

I have been making whole grain bread with yeast water now for about 8 months and absolutely love it~ I get my grains from our local organic health food store.

I had a very hard time getting dry yeast to activate (almost an impossibility for me) and for the most part, I love the (no fail) yeast water.  Makes wonderful bread!

I use raisins, pomegranate, cranberries, chopped up figs & dates...

I also process my own dandelion plants.  I get them from my own yard.  Wondering if the dried leaves would be good in this.

Ya know, this bread making is trial and error...I think I will try it

 

love-breadin''s picture
love-breadin'

I went ahead and used the yeast, and the loaf raised.  One more lesson learned

Put dry dandelion leaves in yeast water with other fruit and it smells heavenly.  Can't wait to try it in bread

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that dandelions in bread would be great.  Other green plants and herbs are fantastic and dandelions should be too.  I also harvest them from my yard and are great in salads.   I too use YW for bread sometimes in conjuction with SD starters too.  It makes great bread with a crumb that can't be matched any other way that I know of.

budhi1976's picture
budhi1976

Just made my first yeast water made out of frozen strawberry... It turns out pretty well, I'm going to use it tomorrow and see how it goes...

Will come back here and post the result.

 

Cheers,

 

Budhi - Indonesian

budhi1976's picture
budhi1976

This is the picture (click to enlarge) of the loaf I made using the strawberry yeast.

The texture is nice, pretty similar to the loaf made of instant yeast, however the skin's color is much darker. I can detect a hint of strawberry aroma as well. The thing is, it took me 25 hours to make it. Start at 14.00 yesterday and done baking at 15.00 today...


Is there anyway to accelerate the yeast performance?

 

Cheers,

Budhi - Indonesian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

If you you use 125 g of YW and a like amount of flour it may take 6 hours for it to double and be ready for bread making . Then it may take 2.5 hours to mix and develop the gluten in the bread and another 4 hours, or more, for it to rise in the pan and double before baking .  This all depends on how warm it is in your kitchen.   So it is at least a half a day of waiting around basically, but it could take more.  If you add a little honey to the dough it may help the speed some.

budhi1976's picture
budhi1976

Ah thanks for replying... I am waiting for my next YW batch ready (should be by tomorrow) and I'm gonna try your advice. Hopefully I can make it faster this time. I mean 25 hours is really way too long... Once again, thank you.

cre8ive1970's picture
cre8ive1970

Ok people. I understand much of what is written in this thread but the problem I have is that you all seem to be assuming a certain level of knowledge about baking that I don't have. If I want to start a yeast plant, what are the amount of ingredients I will need to be successful? How do I keep the yeast plant active? Once I have the yeast growing, how do I use it to make bread? How do I maintain the yeast plant for future baking needs? Just pretend I'm from Mars and have never heard of bread. Once I know the basics, then I can have fun experimenting. Thanks :-)