The Fresh Loaf

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My enriched, yeatsed dough keeps getting infected. Please help!

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EstebanP's picture
EstebanP

My enriched, yeatsed dough keeps getting infected. Please help!

Hello,

I make Liège waffles, a type of sweet and yeasted waffle. Two years ago I had an issue that an entire batch of waffles had a cheesy smell, which I assumed meant the batch was infected by a pernicious yeast or bacteria. This happened again a month ago and again this week. I have no idea what's causing it, but I have had to throw away a lot of product (after spending all that time in production). Does anyone have any thoughts on what may be causing this? All three times occurred during the warm summer months, if that's a clue.

-Bumfuzzled in the Bakery

clearlyanidiot's picture
clearlyanidiot

Could you post the recipe/technique? It's kinda hard to comment without more specific info.

EstebanP's picture
EstebanP

Sure. There's a sponge made on day 1, just flour water, and some instant yeast.

On day 2 we add: eggs, milk, invert sugar, vanilla extract, flour, salt, more yeast, the sponge, butter, and pearl sugar.

 

We've been making this recipe 2-4 times a week for the past 4 years, and there were the only three times we've had this issue.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

at least to 70°F and you won't have your sponge growing other organisms in your time frame.  Otherwise you are making sourdough starter with the warmer temperatures, especially when it gets up to about 80°F.   We do that all the time around here.  But it sounds like a sourdough is not what you want.

Sorry you pitched it, might have made some tasty loaves of regular bread.   :)

EstebanP's picture
EstebanP

Ok, We'll try that this week. Thanks for the feedback!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

If you want to avoid making sourdough, look up how to make one.  

The first day is usually a warm day 80-85°F to boost bacterial growth followed by moderate temperatures around 75°F for the next few days.  If this pattern fits your sponge handling, the simple solution is to keep the dough cool, especially that first day or two.  70°F is cool enough to slow down the making of a sourdough to the point of frustration, Doubling and even tripling the time it takes to sour.   It should work.

Another thing to look out for is making sure the equipment, bins and bowls are completely free and clean of the last batch of sponge. The bacteria can hang around on surfaces and then inoculate the next batch of sponge as soon as it is mixed up.