The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Wholemeal Spelt flour,

  • Pin It
bubbletree's picture
bubbletree

Wholemeal Spelt flour,

Is it possible to make white spelt flour from wholemeal at home? I bought wholemeal 'accidentally' and has been mixing it with bakers flour. Run of the bakers and don't really want to buy another one. Prefer not need to get another pack of white spelt too (as I bulked buy the wholemeal).

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I usually grind my own and get about 15% out as a a hard bit extraction but it depends on your sieve,

bubbletree's picture
bubbletree

Hi thanks. Do you have very fine sieve?

I ground them in Thermomix and sieved it. But somehow the loaf was still quite dense (as compare to white spelt). Maybe my sieve is not fine enough?

hanseata's picture
hanseata

a home sieve works well enough to do what commercial mills are doing. I just baked brioches with white spelt (German Typ 630) - usually I bake only with whole spelt, and I cannot imagine you would be able to achieve this fineness.

I tried mixing whole grain rye and white rye before to achieve medium rye consistency - no success, so I finally mail ordered some. Same with medium wheat. Home sifting (or flour mixing) can, at best, come a little closer to the "real thing".

Therefore, like DBM says, I either make do with what I have, and have a somewhat different consistency - or I don't want to compromise and buy it from specialty stores (or import little packages from Germany).

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

A commercial mill will sift out 28% to get to what they call 'straight' flour ate 72% extraction.  All patent flours are made from this, the more whole grain, straight flour and are even less whole grain. lower extraction percent and finer texture.  what we have at  is a crude setup at best - but it still makes great bread.

My sieve is one i got at Goodwill - it came from France and gives me around 85% most of the time.

Since most of my bread has a lot of whole grains in it, I sift out the hard bits to feed to the SD levain so they are as wet for as long as possible - they don't get thrown away.   So, if you use a lot of whole grains, a home mill is a way to go but you will still be buying AP, bread flour and other flour you can't make at home.