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Interesting 1880 German Baking Book

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MIchael_O's picture
MIchael_O

Interesting 1880 German Baking Book

Chemie der menschlichen Nahrungs- und Genussmittel, Volume 2 is a German book available on Google Books, has anyone tried to translate this book? I only read moderate German so it takes me a long time to decipher some sentences. I want to translate this book with the help of others because this book seems to have really good info.

Foe example, I was trying to make a king cake with natural food dyes, but I didn't know how to produce a purple color, well this book lists methods used by other cultures:

Red: cochineal, beets, madder juice, cherries

Blue: Indigo solution

Purple: Blue+Red

Yellow: saffron, safflower, tumeric, marigold, yellow berries/grapes (Avignon, Persian)

Green: Spinach juice

Black: Chinese Ink

Elsewhere.

 

I found some interesting entries though:

Das Kriegsbrot - 60 parts rye flour, 30 parts white flour, 10 parts corn flour
Paderbornerbrot 270 kg rye flour, 100 kg white flour,  2 kg buckwheat, 1 liter oil, 6 kg salt, 6 kg sourdough

In the land of Serbia a dough is formed with corn flour and water, covered with cabbage leaves, and is
either baked with hot ashes or placed in a large dutch oven.

Baking bread should to take place quickly with too high a temperature and should not take place for a long time with too low a temperature. In the former case the water and gases leave the bread too soon and you are left with a burnt crust. In the latter case, too much water and gas escape and you will have a very dense bread .

Das Backen soll ferner nicht zu rasch bei einer zu hohen Temperatur aber auch nicht zu langsam bei einer zu niedrigen Temperatur erfolgen In ersterem Falle werden das Wasser und die Gase zu schnell ausgetrieben das Brot platzt und erhält eine brenzliche Kruste im letzteren Falle entweicht zu viel Wasser und Gas aus dem Innern des Brotes man erhält ein sehr dichtes Brot

 

 
Antilope's picture
Antilope

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MIchael_O's picture
MIchael_O

I was actually looking for a German book to be translated to English. The two "German" cookbooks above are both English language books intended for non-German audiences

 

 

DavidEF's picture
DavidEF

A friend of mine who is German just recently got a German bread book named Brot, which means bread. I didn't look at the date or the author. She left town this weekend and wanted to let me borrow it so I could make some "good German bread". while she was away. So I opened it up, and sure enough, it is all written in German. But the pictures are so lovely, I will have to translate and try at least a few recipes from that book. Funny too, there is a baguette recipe, as well as a brioche. I guess there are some breads that are just good no matter who you are!

So, if anyone has an excellent resource for translation, I'd be interested to know as well.

Antilope's picture
Antilope

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jkandell's picture
jkandell

David, I've been baking Russian breads successfully using good old Google translate.  If you understand baking it's easy to fill in the blanks.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

is always good for a ROFL, but is not the greatest source for translating German - neither is Bing. If you are a fairly experienced bread baker you can figure out the meaning from the context, but people with less experience will have more difficulties.

But here at TFL are German members who can translate, like Jürgen Krauss and me. I will be happy to help.

Karin

 

adri's picture
adri

detto

hanseata's picture
hanseata

is a specialty bread from Paderborn, its a great bread, and I bake it regularly - though I haven't seen a recipe containing buckwheat, yet.

Karin

MIchael_O's picture
MIchael_O

Okay. Nice to see a picture. I calculate the following for Paderbornerbrot:

72.78 bakersRye Flour 
26.95 bakersAll-Purpose Flour 
0.54 bakersBuckwheat
0.24 bakersOil 
1.62 bakers100% hydration 
70.62 bakersWater 

Anything close to your recipe?

Also, as a current events side note. I found out the US National Soccer Team Coach, Juergen Klinsmann, was an apprentice baker near Stuttgart under his father before he decided to play football professionally.

 

MIchael_O's picture
MIchael_O

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_von_Brotsorten

The Paderborner Bread, Wikipedia lists it as 51 to 89 percent rye flour, the old German bok on Google had the recipe at 76 percent rye, so I guess the Bread list is pretty accurate.

 

PetraR's picture
PetraR

The bread looks so yummy, I can almost taste it with unsalted Butter and a nice Gouda cheese. * drooling here *