The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Stocking up for Ploetziade 2

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Stocking up for Ploetziade 2

Since the 2nd phase is 'Ancient' grains that include Farro (Emmer) Einkorn and Kamut..... off to Whole Foods to hit the bins I went.  I've never seen Einkorn in the bins but they have Kamut and Emmer.   When I go there I was shocked.  They still carried Kamut in the bins but many of my usual grain favorites like Farro, whole Oat and several others were gone!  I was heartbroken since this is the only place you can get them in town.

While I was checking out I mentioned to the checker, when she asked if I found everything I want,  that no I couldn't and that many of my favorites were gone from the bins and as a bread maker who grinds my own flour.... it was disappointing.  She immediately got on the pager and called a guy up to the register to see if he could help. I'm glad she did.

He said that they also have whole grains in two other places in the store, the pasta section and the health macrobiotics section so off we went.  In one they had 2  kinds of Hayden mills grains and flour.  This is the mill that just opened up in Tempe where the owner has tried to get local framers to grow grain for him that are native to AZ  and locally sourced like Sonoran White, Desert Durum and some other grains that are hard to get like Farro. 

These Hayden mill grains were not cheap.  Whole berry Farro was $8 for a pound and a half and the ground Desert Durum Semolina was $10.  For some reason they didn't carry the Sonora White.  I bet it is cheaper at the mill too.  We also found a pound if Farro berries from Italy for $4 and a pound of Einkorn from Tuscany for the same price.   All of them are just ungodly expensive but you can't bake with 'Ancient Grains' if you don't have any.  It is great to find the Desert Durum since it is the best semolina I've ever seen and my source for it had dried up at the pasta factory in Glendale,

Now we are getting into $10 bread just for the dry ingredients:-)    

Happy Ploetziading

golgi70's picture
golgi70

So tell me if I read correctly.  Must use organic ancient grains and/or non conventional organic grain.  But in the transcription it says jaw bread, roll, or biscuit.  So what are we making?  Is Bread acceptable?  

I think I might join in here.  Although my ancient grains are limited I think I can get a few varieties.  

Cheers

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

using Google German....there are 3 ways to go. 

1.  Bake with the ancient grain varities of einkorn, emmer and Kamut

2. bake with organically grown new varieties

3. Bake with a mix of ancient and organic.

I'm also pretty sure you don't have to bake a bread that looks like a jaw  - unless you want to shape one that does!

I'm trying to find out if the Hayden Mill grains and flours are organic or not.  I'm sure they are grown organics but probably haven't been grown long enough to get certification?

adri's picture
adri

2. is more "breeded" than "grown". You cannot use standard wheat (no conventional grains or hybrids) that is just organically grown. The examples are breeded back to a more original form (Lichtkornroggen) or a type of Einkorn.

 

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

means "chewy"? :) That's my best guess, until some German speakers pipe up.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

How the words "Backe ein Brot" got translated  to "jaw bread"  We will never know...    

"Backe ein Brot"  is  "Bake a Bread."   

OT:  Backe ein Brot, Brötchen oder Kleingebäck 

I can't pull up a translation easily, probably because I have my settings for both English and German in original text (OT.) 

adri's picture
adri

"Backe" as noun could be cheek. ;)

The jaws in pliers are called Backen (plural for of Backe) in German.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

because "Backe" was at the beginning of a sentence.  If it was not the first word, it might have been translated properly into English?  (Nouns are capitalised in German.)

Getting a red cheek thinking about it.  Dough pliers would be interesting...

dosco's picture
dosco

I read through the Plotzblog as well and was wondering if modern and organic BF could be included to develop some gluten in the final bread ...?

Or do the ancient grains have enough gluten to develop a decent crumb?

Regards-
Dave

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

cab be used alone or in conjunction with the ancient ones.

adri's picture
adri

Unfortunately, google translate failed here. I think this is due to the fact, that a lot of people here use "züchten" (to breed) when they just grow a plant. But the part in parentheses explains it "keine konventionellen Sorten aus Hybridsaatgut" (no conventional  type/sort/breed/strain/species* or hybrids)

 

*"cultivar" sounds nice ;)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Task:   jaw bread, rolls or biscuits of your choice (new or existing recipe) with:

  • an old type of grain (eg kamut, emmer, einkorn) or
  • an organically farmed cereal (eg light grain rye, wheat gold flowers, Franck grain)

In what way the grain is processed (whole grain, meal, flour) does not matter. The only restriction: The pastry may only consist of old or organically farmed varieties (no conventional varieties of hybrid seed).

He clearly states ancient grains  or  organically grown cereals - like light rye.  Light rye isn't ancient.  Organic grain farmers are very rare and banning their grain just because they don't grow einkron ,emmer or Kamut would be a tragedy.  I'll send Lutz an email to confirm.

adri's picture
adri

Yes, organic grains are very rare.

But the usual organic flour that you can buy in every supermarket and discounter is not of organic grains. It is made with conventional not gm grains on organic fields without pesitcides...

This means, not every organic flour can be used.

 

btw.: All my breads have 100% organic flour (if not experimenting with protein powder ;)). I think in Germany/Austria it is hard to find a hobby baker that doesn't use organic flour. The kg organic at the discounter just costs 1,49€ ($0.93 per lb). There is not much price difference to the non organic brands.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I don't know what a jaw bread should be, but Google Translate is always good for a laugh. Why don't you simply ask good ole Karin for a translation?

"Bake a bread, roll or small pastry of your choice (existing or new recipe) with:

  • ancient grains (like Kamut, Farro, Einkorn) or
  • organically bred new grains (like Lichtkornroggen, Goldblumenweizen, Franckenkorn) (I don't know whether we have something like that in the US)

In which way the grains are processed (whole kernels, coarse grind, flour) doesn't matter. The only requirement: the baked good should only contain ancient or organically bred new kinds of grains (not conventional ones from hybrid seeds).

Cut off date:
25. May 2014
Please send detailed recipe plus photo(s) and link to your blog post (if applicable) to:

lutz[at]ploetzblog.de (email address has [at] instead of @ to prevent it from getting scrambled here)

Only one recipe per participant. Please include at least one photo of your "Saatgut-Brot" (ancient grain bread) and one crumb shot."

This challenge is about supporting farmers and bakeries that produce and use ancient or organically bred new grains versus mass produced hybrid grains.

I'm working on it, fortunately I can get all those ancient grains here in Maine.

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Desert Durum from Hyden Mills qualify as new and organic?

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Some people asked Lutz this question, too:

It doesn't necessarily have to be organic flours, but don't use one of the modern hybrid grains that are bred for maximum harvest. The goal is to promote ancient grains or new varieties that have been bred in the traditional, old fashioned way, not GMO-ed or otherwise "frankenfooded".

So if your Desert Durum is one of these honest, good to the environment grains, it is fine.

You don't have to use just one kind, either. I didn't see any limitations to add-ins, so I will most likely put some hemp seeds or nuts in.

Anyway, it's fun, and I hope I can come up with something before I fly to Germany in 2 weeks.

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Hayden Mills is promoting the local grains that used to be planted in AZ and dell out of favor - to the hybrid ones used today for they reasons they were hybridized - larger harvest, salt tolerant, pesticide resistance. less fertilizer required, less water required etc.  Now we can get Desert Durum and Sonoran White grown locally again.

I don't think you need to go to Germany to influence the judging of Olympics 2 though.  I'm sure Mr Lutz will judge your entry fairly and it will be fine on its own :-)  Have fun visiting your Mom.  Maybe the two of you could do a dual entry from Hamburg?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Might be interesting to have each state have their own competition with this type of thinking.  After all, there are many types of grains and many ethnic varieties of bread to choose from.  

hanseata's picture
hanseata

How nice that you can get those grains in Arizona. I don't think they have something similar in Maine, but I will check.

I booked an Airbnb with kitchen, so I even might bake something in Hamburg. My mother stores all kinds of stuff in her oven - it's used only on very, very special holidays :)