The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kamut-Type 00 with Rye

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isand66's picture
isand66

Kamut-Type 00 with Rye

My previous bake was a straight dough using 00 Caputo flour and a little Kamut flour.  For this bake I wanted to make a sourdough version and also add some rye and bread flour.

I am starting to like the characteristics of combining the 00 style flour with other flours a lot.  It helps create a lighter crumb which sometimes is a nice change of pace.

The final bread came out great with a nice dark crust and open and light crumb.  The Kamut adds a nice nutty flavor along with a yellow complexion to the dough.

I built the starter up in 2 stages starting off with my AP 66% hydration mother starter.

Closeup1

Kamut-00 Sourdough (%)

Kamut-00 Sourdough (weights)

Main

Levain Directions

Step 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Step 2

Mix the flour and water with all of the levain from step 1 and let it sit at room temperature again until it is doubled.  At this point you can either use it right away or put it in the refrigerator and use it the next 1 to 2 days.

Closeup2

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours with the main dough water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb1

CrumbCloseup.

Comments

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Ian:  This could be my kamut recipe...wonderful.  I am sure it tasted great. I am not familiar with Type 00 flour.  Can you explain?   Thanks for sharing.  Best,  Phyllis

hanseata's picture
hanseata

European flours have less protein than American flours. Italian Tipo 00, German 405 or English soft flour have only 8-9% protein (AP has 10-12%). They make the crumb softer and fluffier.

If you combine soft flour with other flours, like rye and spelt (like in Tyrolean Pumpkin Seed Bread), you get a fairly fluffy crumb even with those other flours.

Karin

hanseata's picture
hanseata

European flours have less protein than American flours. Italian Tipo 00, German 405 or English soft flour have only 8-9% protein (AP has 10-12%). They make the crumb softer and fluffier.

If you combine soft flour with other flours, like rye and spelt (like in Tyrolean Pumpkin Seed Bread), you get a fairly fluffy crumb even with those other flours.

Karin

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Karin for chiming in.

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Karin:  I will be in England, so will check for this.  I buy flour there all the time, but haven't checked the protein content.  Perhaps if I find a good one, I will bring it back to California!  I found that lots of the flour in the UK in the general supermarkets was self rising.  I wasn't paying attention to this and then wondered why my starter was going crazy on the counter!  In addition to the flour, the starter was sitting on top of the counter over the dishwasher, which was getting really hot!  I kept thinking, wow, my starter really is much more active here in the UK....I carried my starter over in my checked luggage, so it was the same "mother" as back in California....Thanks for the tutorial on 00.  This will be another way I can annoy my husband, by stopping to read all of the labels on flour in the store.... Best,  Phyllis

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for your comment Phylis.  Karin has done a nice job explaining below.  I usually use this flour for my pizza.  This is the type of flour they use in Italy for pizza and Caputo brand is world known for their combination of wheat they use to come up with their excellent product.  Sometimes I mix part 00 type flour with bread flour or AP for pizza or I use it 100% or like my last pizza bake I added a little whole wheat.

Regards,
ian

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Thanks, Ian.  Very helpful.  I will have to try and find some Caputo brand when I am in Italy.  I was there last year!  I can just see my husband's face when I put a 5 lb. bag of flour into checked baggage.  Come to think of it, perhaps ordering online would be easier....Best,  Phyllis

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I got some 00 from Central Milling a while back (all gone now) and reallly loved using it in conjunction with whole grain as well.  These loaves look excellent.  I bet they taste great.  I want to make a blended Kamut but I want Kamut to be the start of the show and I'm thinking 60% might be the trick but you've done great with 35%.  I'll have to keep that in mind.  

Enjoy

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for your kind words Josh.

I love Kamut and have made a 60% or higher version in the past.  Give it a go and I'm sure you will not be disappointed.

Look forward to hear how your version turns out.

Happy Baking.

Ian

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Nice combination!

(But you should work on your public link for BreadStorm, Ian - shall I send you Jacqeline's instructions?)

Karin

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Karin....alright...you've guilted me into doing it again...It was such a pain in the you know what that I haven't done it.  Send me the directions again if you don't mind.  I don't think it worked for me last time but I figured it out.

Ian

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I'm just too lazy to copy and paste your formulas painstakingly, that's all :)

I sent you a message with the full instructions.

Karin

Syd's picture
Syd

Nice loaf Ian,  Have never used 00 for bread baking, however have used it for pasta.  It is possible to get it here but only by ordering on the Internet so it is not something I always have on hand.

All the best,

Syd

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Syd.  I really have started to enjoy using it in some of my bread bakes.  It is not cheap and I also had to order it on-line.  I found someone on Amazon that had a good price and I have Amazon Prime so I think the shipping was free, but I'm not sure anymore.  I bought 10, 1 lb. bags on the last order.

Regards,
ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Fabulous bake, Ian! 

I'll follow your lead and add the french style flour to my levain breads. We'll see what difference that makes.

Khalid

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Khalid.  Appreciate your kind words.  I was happy how this one came out.  I have one of David's SF Sourdough's with some whole wheat added ready to go in the oven.  I'm hoping it comes out as good as his always looks.  I'm going to experiment on my technique with it depending on how this one comes out.

Look forward to hearing how your French flour reacts to your next bake.

Regards,
ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Khalid.  Appreciate your kind words.  I was happy how this one came out.  I have one of David's SF Sourdough's with some whole wheat added ready to go in the oven.  I'm hoping it comes out as good as his always looks.  I'm going to experiment on my technique with it depending on how this one comes out.

Look forward to hearing how your French flour reacts to your next bake.

Regards,
ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you have been doing you are in fine shape for Ploetziade 2!  I thought Caputo's 00 had higher gluten in the 12.5% range rather than lower in the 8-9 range?  At least that is what this article said..  8-9% is cake flour range and not much good for pizza I'm thinking.

http://www.saveur.com/article/Kitchen/Best-Flour-for-Making-Pizza

This bread looks and has to taste terrific.  Nothing like the color durum puts on the crust and crumb..  I think this is the best crumb so far too.  Pretty nice for only a 33% proof too.  Well Done and

Happy Haking Ian.  Lucy says Hi to your 7 apprentices

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA.  I'm glad you liked this one.  I actually used a similar formula to the challenge bread and switched up the ingredients a bit.  I just about finished it up and now I have to cut into the SF SD from this morning.  I didn't flour the basket well enough so I screwed it up a bit but hopefuly the inside will be better looking than the outside.

Hi to Lucy from the gang!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hi Ian.  I like the corn flour colour the crumb got.  Nicely done.

John

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks John.  If you haven't tried Kamut flour yet, I urge you to try...you won't be disappointed.

Regards,

Ian

CeciC's picture
CeciC

It looks really good Ian!!!

Will have a go at yours when I can get a hold on Kamut Flour. 

Happy Baking

CC

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you CC.  I hope you get a chance to try it yourself soon.

Regards,

ian

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

:( Aww, I really want to try kamut. Getting rye flour here was hard enough, but kamut? That'll be a bigger headache... But yes, I too enjoy experimenting with Typo 00 flour with my breads. It softens the crumb, yet it retains its firmness. Truly wonderful.

Jolly bakings,

Zita

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for your kind words Zita.  This grain seems to be getting very popular so don't be surprised if it shows up at your distributor soon.  You would really love it and your customers would be very impressed with the nutty flavor and yellow-orange color it imparts.

Look forward to hearing more about your further adventures soon.

Regards,

Ian