The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Stone-Ground vs. Steel-Ground

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EsmereldaPea's picture
EsmereldaPea

Stone-Ground vs. Steel-Ground

I have read of the benefits of stone-ground flour vs. flour ground between steel plates.  Has anyone had the opportunity to own both types of mills and can give some insight?  I have a Champion grain mill but am curious if eventually I might benefit from purchasing a stone mill.

 thanks,

Esme 

EsmereldaPea's picture
EsmereldaPea

I found this handy chart that compares different grain mills:

 

http://www.nutritionlifestyles.com/grainmillcomparison.htm

 

Esme 

suave's picture
suave

Here's what one of my books says:

"The fundamental difference between roller-milled and stoneground wholemeal flours is related to the size distribution of the particles that form the flour. These particles come from the bran, germ and endosperm components of the wheat grain. Overall roller-milled wholemeal flours tend to have a greater proportion of endosperm released as white flour compared with stoneground flours. While stoneground flours may be milled to coarser or finer average particle sizes it is difficult to provide flours in which the particle size distributions of the bran and endosperm (white flour components) differ. In bread baking the particle size of the bran can have an important effect on bread quality <...> While coarser bran particles are desirable, coarser endosperm particles are not."

Rosalie's picture
Rosalie

My understanding of "stone-ground flour" was that it was at a lower temperature, and thus there would be less nutrient loss.  If that's the case, I would think that with the quantities we do in our kitchen it would not be so much of an issue.  But I have been known to be wrong.

Rosalie

bonnie1345's picture
bonnie1345

I've had a stone mill and I have now an impact mill. The stone mill was quite heavy and difficult to clean the underside where once to my dismay, I found grain wevils lurking. The flour can be ground a bit finer and also a true coarse grind can be achieved. I found the flour was warm to the touch when first ground. Not unacceptably so though. My main reason for getting the impact mill was easier to clean and smaller and lighter. I can put it away in a cupboard. The stone mill was huge and took up a large space in my kitchen. It wasn't very movable as it weighted about 60 lbs. As far as nutrition goes the difference is negligible.

Bonnie

ClaytonWest's picture
ClaytonWest

I have a question on nutrition loss in steel cut grains. As the stone grinding process creates much less heat the grains retain their nutritional content, is this not then lost anyway when bread is baked?

I am thinking about getting a stone grinding mill, however the nutrition argument sounds faulty to me.