The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pain Au Quinoa

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CeciC's picture
CeciC

Pain Au Quinoa

Original Formula       
50% Multi-Grain Quinoa Levain       
Source       
        
Total Weight2260      
Serving2      
Weight per Serving1130      
        
Total Flour 1100     
Total Water 880     
Total Hydration 80.00%     
Multi-grain % 49.55%     
        
        
 Build 1Build 2Build 3SoakerFinal DoughAdd-InTotal
Levain       
White Starter (100%)20     20
Wholewheat Starter      0
Rye Starter      0
Yeast Water Levain (100%)      0
       20
Flour       
Extra-High Protein Flour (>14%)      0
Bread Flour45   500 545
AP Flour      0
 450005000545
Wholemeal Flour       
Wholewheat Flour45   450 495
Barley Flour    50 50
       0
 450005000545
Liquid       
Water     780 780
Milk      0
       0
Yeast Water90     90
       0
       0
       0
 900007800870
Others      0
Yeast      0
Salt    25 25
Wheat Germ      0
       0
       0
 000025025
ADD-IN      0
Cooked Quinoa     275275
 00000275275
        
Direction       
1) Autolyse 1 Hour      
Disolve Levain in warm water (withholding 30G) add flour and mixed until no dry bites Left       
2) Add Salt and remaining Water, incorporate it with Pincer Method       
3) Give 2 Stretch and Fold within the First Hour       
4) Go into the fridge for 4 hours (as I went out for yumcha)       
5) Take it out of the fridge and fold in cooked Quinoa        
6) Give it another 3 S&F       
7) Total Bulk Fermentation8 Hours      
8) Divide and let it rest for 30 min, it felt a little dry more like a 70% dough       
9) rest for 30 Mins and Shape       
10) baked Cover 30mins and uncovered for 25 Mins     

This bread is inspired by Chad - Tartine No.3 as I have some left over quinoa from the night before, I incorporated it into my bread. which is the best way to kill off any left over which my families arent very keen on. 

As I got a few thing to do that day so I have retard the dough a few times, they werent for flavor development. Here's a few pic of the loaf.

 

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I think it is still slightly over-proof, I shouldnt have warm up the dough

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Even though there is a slight flaw with my proof time, Im still lucky enough to achieve such oven spring n open crumb. 

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Maybe is becoz of the amount of quinoa i added, its taste is pretty apparent in this bread.

 

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Comments

Julie McLeod's picture
Julie McLeod

Funny, I was just thinking yesterday about trying cooked quinoa in a Tartine-style loaf.  Looks like it was a big success.  Thanks for posting!

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Yes its like incorporating sesame seeds into bread, I was thinking it might bring some moisture to the loaf thats why I lowered the hydration from 800 to 780, but It didnt. 

It should be better with extra 20G of water

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is getting out of hand :-) I've never tried it cooked in bread but have ground it into flour and treated it as such.  I don't use it much , even though it tastes great, because of the cost - especially the red kind. That is some kind if fancy do scoring too.  Looks like it was 95% proofed with that fine spring and crumb. Has to taste great CeciC - Chad has nothing on your porridge take!

Happy baking

 

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Hi Dab,

Its on the margin of overproof, I really shouldnt have warmed up the dough. It was ready to go straight into the oven, but I let it warm up for almost 2 hours. Im really lucky that it didnt collapse on me.

Try to incorporate some left over grains into bread, it think that would work just like soaker and it helps to clean up some left over too.

Happy Baking

Cecilia 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

For all that whole grain and then the added quinoa the crumb is wonderfully open.  And the dough totally excepted you leaving for 4 hours after the first couple folds.  In fact that might support the theory that a long autolyse for these porridge breads would be beneficial.  

Nice Baking

josh

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Hi Josh,

I agree with you, after that 4 hours sitting in the fridge the dough was a lot more stronger than before. But is better to leave it in the fridge as it could have completed the bulk fermentation in 4 hours.

I have been thinking if I leave out the leaven and do a long autolyse then add leaven with water and salt that withheld from the main dough and incorporate it with porridge, after this im more confident that it would work just fine.

Happy Baking

Cecilia

isand66's picture
isand66

Beautiful bread.  Love that nice open crumb.  I've used Quinoa in soakers before and really liked the flavor it imparted.

Regards,

Ian

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Yes I still cant find the word to describe its taste. Too good to describe in words

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

We have been trying to have quinoa as a part of dinner a couple times a week.  I have learned all kinds of dishes with it but have yet to try it in bread!  This looks good.  How does the quinoa affect the taste/texture of the bread?  A lot of the time, I end up having some left over quinoa so this would be a great way to use it up.

John

CeciC's picture
CeciC

I guess it would depends on how you cook the quinoa, I did cook it till "al dente" for my salad so it didnt soften the crumb rather its more like adding sesame to the dough with its special aroma. 

I would highly recommend this bread, its really good, the crumb could be more open if i havent overproof it.

Cecilia

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Great use of quinoa. I'm sure the bread tastes good.

I have all colors of quinoa in my pantry, but so far only cooked with it - Molly Katzen's Sweet Potato Chickpea Quinoa Burgers are also a fabulous use of quinoa.

Happy baking

Karin

 

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Hi Karin,

Thanks very much for the recipe, I have been looking for veg burger for quite sometimes, and this one has everything i love!! It must be really good.

Cecilia

hanseata's picture
hanseata

you should try it, Cecilia!

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

But brownman everywhere are saying 'where are the black beans?'  :-)  Got the hearly whole rye levain going today for the Olympic bake on Friday.  Haven't baked a 90% white bread in some time.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I would have thrown in some seeds and nuts. I rarely bake a 90% white bread, either. But great that you are joining the Plötziade, I didn't even suggest it to you because I thought, Lucy would bark your head off at this idea ;)

Karin

CeciC's picture
CeciC

actually i have the same prob, when i saw its 90% white, I really wanna add some seeds n other grains into it.

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Actually black bean is on my list as well, when i make black bean soy millk then I will incorporate the pulp in my bread. I did it a few months back but it wasnt the best so I would try again sometime next month

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I made one bread with sprouted lentils (from Cook's Illustrated) that I liked a lot. But another one, with red lentils and tumeric, stunning as it looked, tasted unpleasantly "bean-ish", though the aroma softened a bit over days. It doesn't seem too easy to find the right balance between the ingredients.

I'm eager to hear about your black bean experiences, Cecilia.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

I tried adding black beans and the squirrels wouldn't even eat it :(.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I really love beans & Co in every dish - except in bread. Only garbanzo beans in small amounts seem to be okay.