The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Too Pooped To Pop - 56.5 Percent Whole Multigrain Sourdough

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Too Pooped To Pop - 56.5 Percent Whole Multigrain Sourdough

This would sort of be our everyday sandwich bread if we had one t least one with a crumb that doesn’t have bits of seeds, nuts and fruits in it.   We do like bits of stuff in the crumb a lot but we have been working on improving the tastes of Lucy’s take on  Josh’s more whole grain version of Pain Maggione.

 

So now we are up to near 60% whole grains with spelt, wheat, rye, barley and Kamut as the whole grains.  We also included our favorite flavor enhancers including; Toadies, ground; sesame and flax seeds, a bit of honey, some red and white malt and, on the liquid side, some grain berry and dried fig soaker waters…. to pump the taste volume of the crust and crumb.

 

Sadly since we changed our counter ferment after shaping from none to 1 hour, our normal 12 hour retard of the shaped loaves was about 1 hour too long but we didn’t get around to balking the bread until the 14 hour mark.

 

Because we are old, got busy dong something else and forget to bake it at the 12 hour mark, when it was 92.37% proofed,   it was easily well over 100% proofed when we finally baked it - instead of the 85% that we like.  So, it was too pooped to pop and we just got a little bloom during steaming.  But, on the bright side it didn’t collapse either… so the crumb should hopefully be OK.

 

One of the other things we changed is that we scheduled the 3 stage levain build (from our 66% hydration multigrain starter that has been in the fridge for a week)  to only end up with a 6 hour retard after the 3rd stage had risen 100% on the counter as opposed to our usual retard of 24 hours after the 3rd stage has risen 25%.

 

We also changed the development to 5 minutes of slap and folds flowed by 1 set of 12 slaps and 1 set of 8 slaps all on 12 minute increments.  We then only did 2 sets of stretch and folds on 15 minute increments before pre-shaping and shaping the dough into an oval.

 

This dough was great to work with even though it was 85% hydration.  It never stuck to the counter and likely could have taken on a few more grams of liquid.  Getting the skin tight was no problem at all.

 

After the hour on the counter, which we will not do next time, into the fridge it went for its scheduled 12 hour retard that should have been 10 but ended up being 14, counting the hour it set in the cold waiting for the oven to get  ready.

 

We really put the spurs to the MAGA Steam by using (2) of Sylvia’s pans with rolled up kitchen towels and  one larger laa rock an ala David Snyder, all half full of water.  The steam went in at the 525 F mark as Big Old Betsy heated up.   By the time BOB beeped, saying she was at 550 F 15 minutes later, the steam was billowing and the top and bottom baking stones were caught up with the oven temperature.

 

We upended the basket on parchment paper on a peel, slashed the dough gently so not to cause a collapse and slid the dough onto the bottom stone, closed the oven door and turned the oven down to 500 F.  After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 475 F remembering that BOB always thinks she is  25 F more than she really is.

 

After 14 minutes the steam was removed and the oven turned down to 425 F - convection this time.  The bread baked for another 12 minutes and it read 203 F when the oven was turned off.  2 minutes later is was 205 F when the oven door was cracked ajar and 3 minute later it read 207 F when it was removed to the cooling rack.

 

How did that flan get in there?

Once again, because of the whole grains, the blisters everywhere but were on the small side, unlike white bread where the blisters are gigantic.  The fig soaker water really put the mahogany color on this crust like dried fruit soaker waters used as dough liquids seem to do most always.

 

Don't ever forget that great salad.

This crust was nice and crisp when it came out of the oven and the bread smelled terrific too.  Can’t wait to cut into it later and see how it holds up to the bruschetta we have planned for dinner, with the mix seafood ceviche, crab cake and sausage sliders with flan for desert.

Yep.....It's and Irish Ruben with homemade mustard adn Dubliner Kerrygold cheese

The crumb came out great; open, moist and soft.   The crust went softer as it cooled, was chewy as well as tasty.  This is a fine tastung bread that is hearty and healty not to metion perfect for bruschetta.  We had a fine dinner but forgot to take pictures - everything was so good we didn't want to get slowed down with pictures.  The flan was the show stopper.

Formula

Nothing like a home made winter squash pie to bring on the summer!

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

RyeSD Starter

10

0

0

10

1.80%

Whole Rye

2

0

12

18

3.91%

Whole Kamut

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Whole Wheat

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Whole Barley

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Whole Spelt

2

4

12

18

3.91%

Water

10

20

40

70

15.22%

Total

30

40

100

170

36.96%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

95

20.65%

 

 

 

Water

75

16.30%

 

 

 

Hydration

78.95%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.48%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Mixed Whole Grain

185

40.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.74%

 

 

 

Water

402

87.39%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

87.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

555

 

 

 

 

Wheat Soaker Water 208, Fig Water 125. Water

477

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration wih Starter

85.95%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

56.58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

84.89%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,098

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.43%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

2

0.43%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.17%

 

 

 

Ground Sesame & Flax seeds

20

4.35%

 

 

 

Toadies

12

2.61%

 

 

 

Honey

12

2.61%

 

 

 

Total

58

12.61%

 

 

 

 

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I get rise in the fridge but not like that ! Wow...she almost burst :)  I may have to try the tiny amounts you feed to your levain at frequent intervals. I just dump some in and when it bubbles it goes in the bread...very scientific !  Love your pics. c

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you should try sifting out the 20% hard bits and use that to feed starters and levain.  This does several thing all at once.  Much if the  enzymes that break down starches into the sugars that wee beasties eat are in this 20%.  So you are giving them as time as possible to do their work.  The hard bits of any whole grain bread that could cut gluten strands are also soaking, getting softer and being devoured by wee beasties for a longer time so hopefully the gluten get cut leas and the crumb is better,

The 3 stage build is important to make a more sour bread and ensure that you are inoculating the dough with as much LAB as possible and as little yeast as possible if built and developed on the counter at 88F to 93 F.  LAB don't like low pH and the frequent feeding keeps raising the  pH over 6 and not letting it get below 4 -a good thing.   The high temperature (i use a heating pad) is where LAB outproduce yeast by at a factor of 3 -13 (the higher temperature the larfger the factor) so that the levain that goes into the dough is full of LAB but not so much yeast so it takes longer for the dough to proof (not this time) giving the LAB more time to reproduce and make acid.

I would usually retard the levain in the fridge for 2 days once it has risen 25% after the 3rd feeding if I have time and wanted even more sour.  The 3 stage build of 4 hour each that has increasing food and water each time makes sure the levain is at its peak when asked to do its job..

If you only feed this levain 12 g of water and 40 g of flour for the 3rd feeding and let that rise 25% before refrigerating - this is my stored starter at 66% hydration or so.  I bake from it over 4 weeks before refreshing back ti its full amount and each week the bread gets more sour as the starter sits in the cold making more LAB to yeast at a 3 to 1 rate.

As of late, my starter is fed the 20% extracted WW and rye in equal amounts without the other whole grains in the mix.  I think it is the spelt in the levain and dough that make dough puff up like this one did in such a short amount of time.  I actually had a spelt loaf go explosive int eh fridge once,  Without the 1 hour shaped proof on the counter before retard and no spelt in the mix, this dough would have been perfectly proofed at 85% in 12 hours and ready to bake right from the fridge or letting it warm up a bit on the counter as the oven heated up - either way much better spring, bloom and crumb - although this crumb wasn't bad at all.

I just find it a fun thing to mess around with levain and starters trying to figure out what works and why it works.  It is nice to change the method around to make a less sour white bread for the girls at room temperature  and a more sour high % whole grain one at higher and lower temperatures for me.  You will have all kinds of  fun in your kitchen science laboratory figuring out what works best for you :-)

Glad you liked he bread and the post with the pictures.

Happy Baking trailrunner.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I was able to read your whole post in my email..but I see that TFL ate it !! It is a good thing we don't like sour as I would never be able to keep up with all the feedings and science !! You are a whiz and thank you for all the explanation. You definitely have a thorough understanding. Me...I just toss it together and what comes out is usually wonderful..thank goodness ! c

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

it won't post the comment where it is typed but it will remember it to email it to you.  I'm glad you got it.  You certainly are not alone when it comes to not liking sour bread and why Tartine and Forkish are so popular around TFL!  I had to learn to make it sour for Lucy and I.   But ,that spelt is tricky and even weird in the fridge compared to other grains - maybe it is just me and my fridge:-)

happy baking TR.

isand66's picture
isand66

I think I just spotted your bread floating over the beach!  Lexie was so excited she jumped about 10 feet in the air trying to catch it :).  Looks like another winner anyway and as long as it didn't pop you should end up with a nice crumb I'm sure. 

Nice corned beef and pie!

Happy Baking.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

collapse when I slashed it so when it didn't Lucy figured that it would collapse in the heat but it survived that too.  Pure dumb luck.  The crumb was about what I expected it to be but just think what it might  have been if baked  at 95% proof instead  175% :-)

I added flan just for you knowing how much you hate desserts and need need to come out of your dessert 'desert' shell and eat one once in a while!

Lucy says hi to all of your apprentices and we are glad you liked the post'

Happy Baking Ian

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

What a Feast! Did you corn your own beef? Well done all round.

Cheers,

Wingnut

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

but do corn or cure it most of the time.  I have another one in the freezer, point cut instead of flat, to smoke later on. prefer smoked corned beef but or St Paddy's day we simmer it gently for 2 hours to get the flavored stock for the potato and carrot.   Then schmear mustard all over it and then brown sugar, wrap it in foil and bake it for 2 hours at 225 F and use those drippings to saute the cabbage (with bacon and  onion) and then re-apply the mustard to finally  finish the beef on the grill to get those caramelized crispy bits.   The girls like it best this way but I liked it smoked just as much - you just don't  get the stock and juices for the other pieces..

This year's St Paddy's Dy meal was the best of all time according to the girls and guest.  Glad you like the post and

Happy  Baking Wing

wassisname's picture
wassisname

It may have been a close call, but you sure did end up with a nice loaf.  Beautiful crumb!  And, no fair posting pictures of flan. =)

Marcus

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

along the line from fridge to baking.  It was so far over proofed ....I hate that when it does it while your sleeping with not chance to fix it.

The flan was delicious and one of my daughter's favorites.  Don't overturn it onto a plate that is too small like I did though!  Got caramel all over the counter top, cabinets and floor.  Quite a sticky mess to clean up and much of the best part is gone.  Lucy loved it though.

Glad you liked the post and

Happy Baking Marcus. - can't wait to see your next post 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I especially love the crumb shot.  A very tasty looking loaf.  The bread looks perfect and I think all that steam might have had something to do with saving the long prove.   I think it has rescued some of my over proved durum loaves.  Beautiful salad and your corned beef is always the best.

Just divine desserts.  You really know how to top off a meal with bread and desserts.

Sylvia 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to do with making sure this loaf didn't collapse:-)  It sure should have......No Lemon Curd Fairy Cakes this year:-(  Lucy's saying is that a meal isn't one without bread and if you eat the desert first.... there is always room for it:-)  Better not to have room for other stuff!  You would like this bread.  The crumb s actually better than it looks  Glad you liked the post and

Happy Baking Sylvia