The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Rugbrøt

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Dwayne's picture
Dwayne

Rugbrøt

I am hoping to make Chad Robertson's Rugbrøt this weekend.  (It has been posted on this site).  I am wanting to use my 13" Pullman Pan.  Does anyone know how many ounce or grams this size pan will take?

 

Thanks for any help,

Dwayne

Veshta Yoshida's picture
Veshta Yoshida

Depends on the other dimensions, the 9"x4"x4" (23cm x10cm x10cm) I use take roughly 1.6lbs of my Ryebread (aka. Rugbrød :) ) dough. Beauty of the moist and very sticky ryebread dough is that you need not fret if some is left over as you can treat it like firm cake dough and bake it in anything really ..

Last few times I made a ryebread bread for gorging on (try to resist!) I made approximately 4.4lbs (2kg) dough, bake two in my 9" pans (freeze one after baking/cooling) and use the remaining pound or so as a very giftable treat .. about 2-3 oz. (~10-20% dough weight) coarsely chopped dark chocolate (~70% solids) mixed into dough and deposited on baking sheet by way of spoon and given 20 mins or so in oven, best treat this side of Nirvana --- Rye and chocolate goes together like nobodies business.

I read Chad Robertson's recipe and looks solid enough, even though he goes a little overboard on the seed/berries for my taste :). He neglects to mention a rather critical bit though, perhaps he wasn't informed properly .. cooling it on a rack for a day will dry it out .. badly.

Trick I use is that as soon as it is cool enough to not melt plastic it goes into a plastic bag and is left for the day (or until craving overcomes me), some here in Denmark wrap it in a damp towel to make sure it is as moist as can be.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne

I just checked and the dimensions of my pan and they are about 13"x4"x4".  The recipe I am using makes about 2.4 lbs of dough so that should be about right for my pan. Thanks for the other tips!

 

How much does the dough rise?

 

Dwayne

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne

Here is the recipe that I plan on using.  I'll eliminate the beer and increase the butter milk.

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29827/chad-robertsons-rugbr%C3%B8t

Veshta Yoshida's picture
Veshta Yoshida

Again, it depends .. there are no absolutes with sourdough, that's part of the charm :)

If your starter is well fed and used at peak then expect volume to increase by at least 50%, the high amount of seed/berries will weigh it down some. Oven spring is usually negligible (comparatively) with berry loaded Rugbrød but it does get some so my advice is to fill your pan 2/3rds and pop it in the oven when it has risen to 1/4" (1cm) from 'lip' or there about.

In case you miss it, which happens for me a lot as I swear my sourdough culture has ADHD or something, you can use a knitting needle or similar to puncture it .. slightly denser end product but then one can just give it another 30-45 mins rising, it is very forgiving.

As for replacing beer in linked recipe, then I'd advise getting some malt elsewhere or your colour and taste will be "off" as it where. Personally have a bag of dark roast malt flour from a beer-gear shop that I use when I can't be bothered to go out for a stout (awesome in rye heavy breads), else get hold of some malt syrup as used in the original Chad recipe .. around here its available in organic/health food stores.

Alternative: Not sure about the market there, but here in Denmark I can get something called Malt Beer which is practically alcohol free (0.5%) but adds all the flavour/colour you'll likely need.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

but i think Mini Oven did a post on how to know how much rye or other bread to put in any pan.  It went something like this, maybe she will chime in.  Put your pan on a scale and zero it.  Then fill with it with water and see how much it weights - lets say it comes in at  2,500 g.

Now you have to guesstimate how much your dough will rise wile proofing and baking.  If you expect it to double  you divide the weight by 2 or use 1,250g if dough.  If you only expect it to rise 50% then 2,500/1.5 - 1,666 g of dough required.  If you think this dough is only going to rise 35% then 2,500/ 1.35 - 1851 g of dough is needed.

I think when I made this bread that I figured 25% rise in the pan and another 10% in the heat for a 1.35 factor.  But I didn't bake it  in a covered Pullman but used foil to cover. 

Hopefully Mini will clarify if I've steered you too far off course.