The Fresh Loaf

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Fell asleep while the bread was rising. Is it still ok?

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AncientMystery's picture
AncientMystery

Fell asleep while the bread was rising. Is it still ok?

For some reason, my bread never rises to "double the size" and "1 inch over the pan" until about 4 hours after rising. I was making this bread late at night and it was taking longer then usual, and I fell asleep. As of now, it has been rising for about 12 hours (active dry yeast). Is it still ok to bake? Or should I just throw out the loaf?

ccsdg's picture
ccsdg

It might be past its optimal proof, but I'd personally bake it anyway. You wouldn't lose anything but electricity for the oven, and you'd most likely still be able to eat the result. You might even be surprised at the last minute oven spring.

Not an expert, but 4 hours sounds like a long time for instant yeast.

Gluten-free Gourmand's picture
Gluten-free Gourmand

My best guess is that it would collapse in the oven if you baked it.  A way to possibly save it would be to punch it down, knead some more flour into it, and see if it rises again.  It sounds like you're using some sort of recipe with very little yeast to start with, so this method might work.  However, if the yeast is maxed out it might not work.  There's usually a smell associated with stressed yeast, but I don't know how to describe it.

Now I'm curious to know what you do and how it turns out!

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

Why don't you bake it and find out? We're waiting breathlessly.

ccsdg's picture
ccsdg

It'll have been proven over 24 hours by now if OP hasn't decided whether to bake it yet! At this point I'd call it starter and make a miche :)

AncientMystery's picture
AncientMystery

Sorry I didn't respond. I kneaded the bread again and risen it. Took about 2-4 hours, but it got to the top of the pan and I decided to bake it. It actually risen to a good height, but was a bit torn on the edges (had this happen before when things don't rise properly, don't know why it does this). The actual bread wasn't all too bad. Other then being a bit dryer, thicker then normal, and sourer then normal, it tasted like it good. The final rise of the bread was about 1 inch over the pan in the center, and about pan height on the corners.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

I leave my bread to rise for 4 to 5 hours, mind you the  dough is very soft and elastic. If you held it up in the air it would drop down very quickly. After the rise time the dough has quadrupled in size and then it doubles when cooked. The sides never break because the dough is so soft.

The finished product is so large I have to cut it in half and then use one half as a normal size loaf.