The Fresh Loaf

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NutriMill or WonderMill

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lew_c's picture
lew_c

NutriMill or WonderMill

I'm trying to decide between the NutriMill and the WonderMill. I read a post here that indicated that WonderMill isn't suited to milling amaranth. But I noticed an attachment for the WonderMill for use with amaranth. Opinions, experiences, advice, etc. appreciated. 

 Confused or possibly just senile, but definitely in need of help,

 lew_c

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

but I have an admittedly old Bosch Magic Mill with the same type of stainless steel cutter wheels as the Wonder Mill, and I hope the Wonder Mill is quieter.  I finally retired the Magic Mill and got a Komo Mill because I could not stand the shriek of the cutters any longer.  I suspect you eliminated Komo because of price.  They are not cheap.  However, they will mill everything that is not oily that you want to send to them, including amaranth.  Except, that is, for popcorn.  Popcorn is too hard and the milling of popcorn is strictly forbidden.  Just a thought, because I love my Komo Mill, and I'm very happy with the stone ground flour it produces.

Sorry I cannot help you on the mills you asked about, but thought it worth mentioning the Komo anyway.

Best of Luck
OldWoodenSpoon

lew_c's picture
lew_c

Thank you for the recommendation. I did look at the Komo and the low dB level is a real draw, but the wood exterior clashes with the pseudo sterile surface theme of my kitchen.

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Lew,  I owned the Wonder Mill, which was a predecessor to the Whisper Mill, and I have a friend with the Nutrimill impact mill -  both are pretty similar in design, the Nutrimill may be a little better built, it takes up a little less counter space when in use.  I don't know if either will handle Amaranth.  I agree with OldWoodSpoon, too loud for me, I gave mine away and got an All Grain.  Also, the motors on the impact mills are generally universal motors, which are not as heavy duty as the induction motors on most stone mills, and the universal motors whine at a high pitch.  I would suggest you look at stone mills - they usually do nice job, come with a better motor, usually can be adjusted for coarse to fine, and can often handle more grains than an impact mill.  There are a few manufacturers - Komo, and Nutrimill makes a version now, http://www.breadtopia.com/store/nutrimill-harvest-stone-mill-250w.html   , as well as All Grain, which is pretty pricey new, but has lots of chrome which might fit into your decor.  http://www.allgrainmills.com/,  If you are willing to buy used, a number of poster here have the Lee Flour mill and it gets raves - though you would likely have to get a bag since when sold used, they are often missing.  

lew_c's picture
lew_c

OK, y'all are getting to me. Looks like I will have to think over my priorities. When I first looked a mills the price was not a problem, but since then my hands have complained a couple of times when kneading so I was also about to pull the trigger on a new mixer that cost more than the Komo Classic.  I've only been baking for a few months. I would feel more comfortable dropping $1200 on it if I were more certain that I was in it for the long haul -- or for as long a haul as we have left :) 

But thanks, the post and links were useful and appreciated.

lew_c

 

lew_c's picture
lew_c

Thanks for the help. Ordered the KoMo Classic and a spiral hook for my 20 year old KitchenAid Classic and will use that for however long it lasts. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

more than 2,000 g if white bread ( not bagels) and 1,250 g if whole grain bread the KA should last a long long while.  You have a great mill coming! 

breadbites's picture
breadbites

The WonderMill grinds amaranth just fine, you just have pour it in slowly. See http://willitgrind.com/willitgrind/amaranth 

I also grind many other small grains and even popcorn in my WonderMill.