The Fresh Loaf

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SF Dough, ferments doesn't sour

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annam's picture
annam

SF Dough, ferments doesn't sour

I went through the process at the suggested site "abreadeducation" ,   waited and checked daily after a week.  It did ferment   lots of small bubbles  but no sense of sourness at least in the odor.   Before I try baking with it,  should I detect some odor of "sour" or will this only show up in the bread?  I want it to be truly SF bread  nice and tangy.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

10 days to 2 weeks for a new SD starter to be ready to bake a loaf of bread but it twill be slow and no where near it will; be in a month.  Once it matures the SD smell will be there.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

is at least 75°F or 24°C for proper SF SD growth.   

you will have to taste it to detect sourness

chris319's picture
chris319

I don't know what your idea of "sour" is, but it should smell of yeast.

Could you post a link to the recipe or the recipe itself? It doesn't readily come up in a google search.

annam's picture
annam

The starter recipe I used was from site recommended under SF forum.  I was thinking of the smell of really good SF sourdough once it is baked.    I can let the starter do its thing for a longer period of time but do I have to add anything other than what was in the original recipe?  this is the link I used   (http://abreaducation.com/blog/2012/08/san-francisco-sourdough/)

chris319's picture
chris319

The starter recipe looks OK. I would let it sit, covered, stirring once per day until it smells of yeast.

If anything, you might add a pinch of salt.

What are you using for the white flour component of your starter?

annam's picture
annam

I am using King Arthur bread flour with the amount of rye in the recipe for starter.

chris319's picture
chris319

The flour sounds fine. Give it time. Stir every day.

At some point it may smell of ethanol/alcohol/cheap wine. Wait for the smell to go away and for it to smell of yeast.

Going forward, once you have a ripe starter, if you want real S.F. sourdough you could skip the rye. You're fine for now.

chris319's picture
chris319

Here is something I've started doing which may help someone who reads this.

If using a liquid starter, at intervals of not less than, say, one week, transfer the starter to a clean vessel. Why? Mold. I've had liquid starter get moldy -- too moldy to use. Erring on the side of caution, I discarded the moldy starter and began afresh. I then had to rethink my starter management strategy.

You could do this in conjunction with a starter refreshment; simply make a flour-and-water slurry (thick batter) in another container and add the existing starter. Wash out the old container with soap and rinse thoroughly. I have two Pyrex measuring cups, one for the old starter and one for the new, and a lid from another vessel.

My mold problems arose from thinking I could keep one container of starter indefinitely. I now do a starter refreshment by making a slurry and adding the inoculum (old starter) no less than 8 hours before baking. So far it's working OK.