The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough and Breadmakers

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AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

Sourdough and Breadmakers

I've seen many mixed reviews on Sourdough and Breadmakers. Many think it doesn't work, some think a breadmaker can be manipulated to make good sourdough and others have "fantastic" recipes for breadmaker which include adding both sourdough starter and baker's yeast (why both?).

I don't have an oven so breadmaker it is. No questions there. I live in a studio apartment with small kitchenette which has a microwave and hob. If I want to make anything more "sophisticated" I rely on sandwich maker, george forman grill and breadmaker.

I have an idea I would like to run past you. There is no cycle for sourdough but what's stopping me from using the dough only cycle, taking it out and allowing to rise for however long it needs then using the bake only cycle?

Sounds good?

 

Antilope's picture
Antilope

If your machine has separate DOUGH and BAKE cycles, you can use it to make real sourdough bread.

I adapted a King Arthur Flour Sourdough recipe, but I leave out their recommended instant yeast.

King Arthur Flour Rustic Sourdough Bread

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/rustic-sourdough-bread-recipe

I use separate DOUGH and BAKE cycles on my Bread Machine. This allows the sourdough to rise at its own rate without using any yeast.

I take the sourdough starter out of the fridge, add a cup of starter to a mixing bowl, add 2 cups of all-purpose flour and 1 cup of bottled water. I use bottled water because chlorine in my tap water seems to slow the starter down. Add a little more water, if needed, so the mixture can be stirred with a wooden spoon. Mix well. Cover bowl and place in an OFF oven with the oven light on for warmth. Let it sit until it is bubbly and vigorous (maybe 4 hours). Stir it down and measure out 2 cups for the recipe below.

Ingredients:

For 1 1/2-lb. loaf

2 1/2 cups Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
1 1/2 teaspoons table salt
1 1/2 teaspoons granulated sugar
2 cups active sourdough starter
1/2 cup lukewarm water (I use bottled water)

Place ingredients in bread machine in order given above.

Start bread machine on DOUGH cycle.

I use a rubber spatula to help the bread maker, if needed, for the first couple of minutes of mixing by pushing any dry lumps into the mixing blade. Adjust dough to proper consistency with more flour or water as needed to make a firm, non-sticky dough that could be kneaded by hand.

Let the bread machine complete its DOUGH cycle kneading (about 1/2 hour) and rise (about 1 hour more).

Immediately after the kneading stops, I remove the kneading paddle and press the dough evenly into the bottom of the bread machine mixing pan. I then turn off my bread machine and unplug itl

I now monitor the dough and allow it to rise to the top of the mixing pan (It takes about 3 or 5 hours for mine. This can vary depending on your starter, room temperature, etc.). You can also place the bread machine mixing pan in the fridge overnight. Take it out the next day, allow the dough to rise the desired amount before baking in the bread machine using the Manual Bake cycle.

When the dough has risen to the top of the bread pan, I start the manual BAKE cycle. My machine bakes the bread for 1 hour.

Remove from machine, allow to cool before slicing.

Makes one 1 1/2 lb loaf.

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

Thank you for that Antilope.

It sucks not having a proper oven but figured that if one has a separate dough and bake cycle then why not!?

My machine makes a 400g bread so keeping all the ratios the same but reducing to correct flour amount I think this is a great recipe to start with.

Antilope's picture
Antilope

their original recipe gives recipe weights in ounces and grams. I created my above recipe before I started using weights and I haven't gone back yet to add the weights to it.

King Arthur Flour Rustic Sourdough Bread

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/rustic-sourdough-bread-recipe

I prefer to bake in the bread machine in the summer to keep the house cool. We have quite a few summer days in the upper 90's or 100's here in Sacramento.

Other King Arthur Flour sourdough recipes

http://search.kingarthurflour.com/search?p=Q&asug=&af=type%3Arecipes&w=sourdough

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

...grams, mls, tablespoons and teaspoons.

So my typical (non sourdough) recipe would be:

 

320g flour

240mls water

1.5tbsp oil

1tbsp agave syrup

1tsp quick action dried yeast

0.5 tsp salt

 

If I convert your recipe...

2 1/2 cups Unbleached All-Purpose Flour           =  320g (PERFECT!)
1 1/2 teaspoons table salt                                    =  same
1 1/2 teaspoons granulated sugar                       = same
2 cups active sourdough starter                           =  480g of sourdough
1/2 cup lukewarm water (I use bottled water)      = 118mls

 

Now my breadmaker calls for 320g total flour so i'll have to adjust. Oh heck, here's where it get confusing. Another thing I don't quite get is the 100% hydration with sourdough. I am in the process of gaarps sourdough recipe. What hydration would I end up with?

 

Antilope's picture
Antilope

start the kneading cycle and then adjust the dough to a hand kneadable consistency. My starter is about 100% hydration, buy you still have to adjust the final dough while it's kneading. That 1/2 cup of water is part of the adjustment, don't add it all at once, only as much as required.

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

""

 

At the end of the day one has to put the scales away and craft the dough to a consistency thats workable. My first few loaves are going to be trial and error anyways. You've given me a good recipe to start with now I experiment.

 

Antilope's picture
Antilope

sometimes come out somewhat pale. They don't have a lot of sugar to promote browning and the sourdough cultures tend to consume the available sugar. Adding diastatic malt or more sugar may help promote more browning. You can't adjust the baking time on most bread machines.

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

I am going to be using whole spelt to start with. I tend to only buy wholegrains. I also find that agave syrup works very well. Get good results with it. Yes, baking time on my machine is unadjustable. As long as it's edible and tasty! :)

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Can it be adjusted by simply baking twice and turning it off when done?

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

I have stopped half way through a kneading cycle and chosen a different time. But i've never done so through a baking. It is possible! I also have an option of light, medium or dark crust. On most breads I choose light but I suppose with sourdough I could try medium or dark.

Thanks for the suggestion.

 

Antilope's picture
Antilope

It a temperature sensor. If it is hot from running the bake cycle it will not start another bake cycle until it has cooled to room temperature. It gives an error and warning message on its LCD display. So starting another bake cycle immediately after the first cycle will not work. It will allow you to program different times for a bake cycle, however.

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

Mine doesn't allow different times for a bake cycle. I think.

Will just try the dark crust option and see what happens. Good news is that my sourdough starter is coming to life. Not long now before it will be ready.

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11

For my breadmaker...

 

188g whole spelt flour

0.5tsp salt

1tbsp agave syrup

282g sourdough

69.5mls water

 

that is the correct ratio all converted. According to my calculations this should create a 400g loaf.