The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My bread isn't White?

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eddieb's picture
eddieb

My bread isn't White?

Hi,  I have been baking bread for several years, started with a bread maker and progressed to hand making. I use strong white bread flour and get good results, however because of an indigestion problem I cannot eat my own bread, ( the family love the bread ) and I have to buy a shop made loaf.

I live in an outer area of Belfast and the loaf I buy/eat is a Belfast Bap long. This loaf is white with a burnt topping ( Japanese Rice flour ) the loaf is very light and soft and without a doubt the best bread I have ever eaten. If I could reproduce it I would be a very happy chappy! ( I have tried with a couple of recipes but alas both failed).

To my question, I cannot bake a White loaf, I always have a light brown inner, what am I doing wrong.

My ingredients: Flour ( as above ) water, salt  and yeast. baked for 20/25 minutes at 220 deg.

I would appreciate any tips.

regards,

Eddie.

 

Heath's picture
Heath

It's normal for a home baked white loaf to have a creamy or beige crumb - it's actually a sign of a good loaf.  A bright white crumb is due to oxidation of the flour during prolonged high-intensity mechanical mixing.  That oxidation means less flavour, which is why a glaringly white crumb is seen as inferior by many traditional and home bakers.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

OK! Thank you for the reply and explanation.

Heath's picture
Heath

As for a soft, fluffy white loaf (a common query here on TFL), this thread contains a recipe by Rose Levy Berenbaum from The Bread Bible, which is raved about in the comments underneath.

Also, if you put something like "light and fluffy white loaf" into the search bar in the top right-hand corner, you'll find a myriad of other recipes.

eddieb's picture
eddieb

Again, thank you for your reply. I have been successful in my search for a " fluffy light loaf ", I have discovered that I haven't been leaving the loaf long enough to rise. After placing the mix into a cake tin ( the round type with a 35mm lip ) I placed it in the oven ( cold ) and left it for approx five hours. The mix quadrupled in size and was then baked for 20 minutes at 220c. The result was perfect, just to my liking.

I would like to add that I use " cold " water straight from the tap with perfect results. I say this because I noticed that quite a few recipes use  warm water.

Heath's picture
Heath

I'm really glad it's worked out for you :-)

I think some recipes use warm water to speed fermentation, but it's not necessary.  The rise will just happen a little slower with cold water.  (The only exception to that is that some yeasts (not instant) need warm water to activate them.)