The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

High extraction Miche from Peter Reinhart's WGB

  • Pin It
Mebake's picture
Mebake

High extraction Miche from Peter Reinhart's WGB

Last weekend, I've thankfully managed to squeeze in a bake in the midst of a hectic family, and professional commitments, Phew!

I've been wanting to bake the High extraction Miche in "Whole grain breads" ever since i saw it, but the idea of sifting whole wheat flour (Oh the horror!) deterred me. Until, that is, i realized that the flour is abundant in Dubai, and UNDER MY NOSE!. In fact, there are several mills in Dubai that produce the flour "Chakki atta" and many  available in supermarkets, but i've settled for what i think is best in terms of refinement and quality.

Strictly speaking, it isn't an ideal High extraction flour, rather, a whole wheat flour with some bran sifted away. It is around 95% extraction (I add some bread flour to reduce the extraction percentage). The flour is milled from either an Indian or a Pakistani Wheat (the closest, and largest wheat producing nations to us), so lacks the qualities of European and north american red winter wheat. However, it performs quite well in recipes that call for HE flour, due to its smooth and light texture. That's what matters.

As with all WGB recipes, a soaker and a biga ( A starter in this case) was prepared. The soaker was kept at room temp. and the starter was allowed to ripen, then refrigerated. Next day, i mixed the two, added some flour and yeast, proofed and baked at 450F for 15 minutes with steam, and 25 min. at 400F without steam.

The bread's flavor is that of typical Whole wheat hearth breads ; earthy , nutty, faintly sour, and very satisfying. Good recipe, and easy to prepare a head.

Some days ago, as i Looked at our grocery bags, i saw the dreadful white sliced bread that my wife has bought. It was time that i made my children their favorite sliced bread for school. I mixed some Biga dough, and let it ripe for 8-10 hours. The recipe is that of Hamelman's book. When ripe, i mixed the flours, honey, yeast , water , salt, and mixed them until combined. Then, i added butter and worked the dough to a developed gluten stage. Fermentation lasted for 2 hours, with one fold, a preshape, shape, and finally baked in a pullman pan with the lid off for total of 40 minutes at 450F.

The bread was very light and soft , owing to the butter and honey. A delicious bread for toast, and sandwiches.

Khalid

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

don't; know how you find time for it all with your work and market baking too.  It all looks and has to taste good.  Well done and happy baking  Khalid

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yes, thats what eventually happened , DA :)

I don't know, either, but these days i tend to bake whenever the urge comes. My uncle, also, is now a regular recipient of my breads.

Thanks, my friend. 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

You delight the eye with your  baking !!  Lovely breads and an amazing crumb. I bet your children open their lunch with joy. Don't know how you meet so many obligations. Glad you continue to post.  It is wonderful that you found the flour so close to home. It was the same when I discovered that the primary producer of sprouted flours and grains  in th USA is just up the road from me !  Nice. c

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yes, the kids seem to tell the difference now between a proper bread, and a bland industrial one. Their tiny little taste buds are also getting  accustomed to the sour tang of hearth breads, minus the chewy crust of course.

I'm juggling baking into my daily routine, and it has been alright so far. Bread baking can fit almost any lifestyle. It can be a tight affair at times, but i tend to manage. 

Many thanks, Caroline.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

My grandson now lives only 10 minutes away. I bake for him/them all the time. He turned 2 in Nov and moved here this past Aug. He calls me "Dahmie" . When I come to their house with a brown sack he says" Dahmie surprise !" and grabs the bag :)   I make what I call baps for him out of whatever dough I am making. Essentially hamburger size buns. He opens the bag and yells BAP !!  and takes a bite. His sharp white teeth tear in to whatever I bring. It is SUCH a joy, I can tell you. My children are now 31,36 and 39 ( baby's dad). When they were his age, starting in the mid 1970's they too loved "Momma's Bread".  

As you can see you are making memories that will carry on to the next generations. Baby's Dad is a professional chef as is baby's Momma. He has his own little kitchen set ( purchased by yours truly Dahmie !) and his own apron and spatula and...well you get the picture.  Here he is making pasta with his Tahpie ( aka Grandpa). 

taken this past Summer when he was still a "baby" !  photo 2013-07-18164740_zps97ca99aa.jpg

Mebake's picture
Mebake

What a cute little man! He looks so amazed by the pasta machine, no wonder, he takes after his parents. How joyous you must feel with the presence of a grandson in the vicinity! I'm sure he takes after you as well. 

I have a boy who just turned 6, and a girl aged 4. What's interesting, is that my son evolved to appreciate the nutty sweetness of sourdough breads; he asks for a slice when ever i prep the loaf for a photo shot. Nothing would please me more than to see him, (and his imitating Sister) happily munching away a slice of freshly baked sourdough bread. The visual appeal that a hearth bread has seems to convince them that it tastes good! 

Thanks for sharing this with us, Dahmie :)

 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I baked with and for my 3 children from the time they were new born. They grew up surrounded by fresh baked goods and nutritious grains etc as I ran a food coop out of my home for 8 years...we had about 50 families that purchased in bulk every month. It was an amazing experience for us all. 

We just got back from a short visit...they live on the way to /from our gym....Griffin was eating lunch. When he saw me he waved a piece of bread at me and yelled " Dahmies' bread...cheese toast !! " ...big grin. Nothing like it. I hope that your children will want to mix and shape and taste your breads as well. 

In the early 1950's my Mother gave me pie dough to roll out on the seat of a wooden chair with a glass for a rolling pin. I had my own pie pans. My Mom did the same with her Mom...and so it goes...4 generations and counting...I sure hope that I will be around for the next one :)  

Thank you Khalid for sharing and letting me share with you . Delightful conversation. c aka Dahmie

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Delightful, i agree. 

Wishing you, your sons, and grand sons all the best. I hope you catch up with the 4th generation :)

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Not to highjack Khalid's post, but I couldn't help myself. I think getting kids involved in cooking is so good on so many levels ... 

My 3 year old pasta making grandson is now 14 and still making pasta with his dad (my son).

David

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

precious boy !  Our Griffin calls them " noodoos"!!  He is unstoppable in the kitchen. Especially loves the bubbles in the dishwater...hope his future bride appreciates it LOL !!  Guess we need to start a new thread...kids in the kitchen!  Thank you David for sharing such precious moments. And Khalid for extending his hospitality to the "grands" on TFL. c

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Looking good, Khalid! I'm always envious of your pullman breads, as I've no experience with them... Yours are certainly appealing to the eyes and likely to the other senses.

Jolly bakings,

Zita

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Zita!

For bread panning, you'd have to get the loaf shape and size down in order to have an evenly risen bread. It can be challenging to tell whether the dough is ready, as poking isn't a reliable method with some doughs, but with experience you'll learn when by looking at it.

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Darn! Some one has to do something about that comment eating critter.

Thank you Zita. Bread panning can be challenging, but with experience you can judge the dough's readiness by looking at it. Shaping skills are important too.

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I've not made the miche from WGB, but I made the one from BBA many times. Of the various miche formulas I've baked, it was closest to Pain Poilâne.

I've never baked with atta flour, although I have with durum. I don't know if the South Asian atta is really identical to Italian durum though. Do you know?

Anyway, both breads look really nice.

David

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thank you David!

Oh, i wish i could walk into Polain in Paris, as you did once. 

I don't own BBA. My first book was WGB. 

Ad to Indian durum, well, i don't think i've seen an indian durum wheat before. I've only bought and milled Indian common wheat that is available in some grocery stores here. I've purchased some Organic Italian durum wheat before and it looks nothing like the indian wheat. Perhaps there are several strains of wheat in India. 

 

dosco's picture
dosco

Very nice result with your miche ... my first attempt at Reinhart's Poilane style was OK but nothing like your result.

How similar is the WGB recipe to the BBA Poilane recipe?

The pics of the granddads/moms with the kids are very cool. My father passed away when my oldest daughter was 3, they both got the short end of the stick. Sigh.

Cheers-
Dave

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Dave!

I haven't seen the BBA recipe, so can't tell the difference. Traditionally, a Polain loaf contains no yeast, but WGB's version does. Most of WGB recipes call for a substantial amount of yeast in the final dough, as half the dough is already fermented and flavor is already developed. Reinhart points out in his book, that the yeast can be skipped if you like a noticeably sour bread. I don't.

As to the cute little kids whose pictures are shown above, those weren't mine :) they are David and Caroline's grand children.

all the best,