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Saatenbrot - Many Seed Bread (Equal Opportunity Baking #3)

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hanseata's picture
hanseata

Saatenbrot - Many Seed Bread (Equal Opportunity Baking #3)

The best recipe collection (bread, rolls and snacks) of German bakers' magazine, "Allgemeine Bäckerzeitung", supplied the formula for my third "fair baked" bread.

A heavy weight, scaled for 21 loaves, with selling points, marketing tips, production cost and time calculation, including sales tax (7%) and even a suggested retail price (1.83 Euro). The production steps are briefly listed - no need to explain to professionals what they do every day.

  Die besten Rezepte aus der Allgemeinen Bäckerzeitung - Brot, Brötchen & Snacks

Scaling the ingredients down to home bakering proportions was not difficult (a minimum of 3 loaves), and the instructions, though brief, were precise, and didn't overtax my mental capacities.

The recipe said (more or less) only: "make a dough". I tried to stretch and fold it, but that didn't work too well, the dough was too wet. Therefore, instead of soaking only the flaxseeds in hot water for 1 hour (original recipe) I would include some of the flour in the soaker, to have a larger preferment, and more water already absorbed in the flour.

I like to retard my doughs, overnight fermentation works better for my schedule, and, also, improves the taste (the original recipe had only the longer starter development.)

The Bäckerzeitung says: "roll the shaped loaves over a wet towel, and then dip them into the (topping) seed mixture". Though this coated the breads nicely with seeds, they didn't stick well enough, and a lot of them fell off during and after baking. Next time I would either take care to press them more into the dough, or brush the loaves with egg white, instead of just moistening them with water.

The breads turned out very nice, crusted with seeds they looked quite attractive, and the taste? Modestly (haha!) I will only quote my friend Lynn - beneficiary of this triplet bake: "Our seedy, seedy bread was delish! We toasted it which really brought out the flavor of the seeds! Mmmmmmm!"

 

SAATENBROT - MANY SEED BREAD (3 loaves)

SOAKER
143 g whole wheat flour
  84 g medium rye flour
299 g water
     4 g salt
129 g flaxseed

 STARTER
  21 g rye mother starter (mine is 100% hydrated)
214 g medium rye flour
214 g water, lukewarm
 
FINAL DOUGH

all starter and soaker
130 g medium rye flour
143 g bread flour
187 g water
    5 g instant yeast
  12 g salt
129 g sesame, toasted
129 g hemp seeds
    2 g anise, caraway, fennel and/or coriander
 14 g sesame seeds (for topping)
 14 g hemp seeds (for topping
 14 g flaxseed (for topping)

 DAY 1:

1. In the morning, stir together all ingredients for soaker, cover and let sit at room temperature. Mix all ingredients for starter (in 1-step), cover and let ferment at room temperature.

In the evening, mix together all ingredients for final dough for 1 - 2 minutes on low speed. Knead on medium-low speed for 4 minutes (or knead by hand). Let dough rest for 5 minutes. Resume kneading for another minute (dough will still be somewhat sticky). Divide dough into 3 portions, place in oiled containers, cover and refrigerate overnight.


DAY 2:

2. Remove dough from refrigerator 2 hours before using. Shape into sandwich loaves. Roll breads over wet towel, and then over seed mixture. Gently press seeds into dough. Place breads in oiled loaf pans. (No scoring). Mist with spray oil, cover, and let rise for 45 - 60 minutes, or until they have grown 1 1/2 times their original size.

3. Preheat oven to 240ºC/465ºF, including steam pan. Place pans into oven, steaming with 1 cup of boiling water. Bake at falling temperatures: 10 minutes at 240ºC/465ºF, 10 minutes at 220ºC/428ºF, then turn loaves out onto baking sheet, remove steam pan and continue baking for 10 minutes at 200ºC/400ºF, and 10 minutes at 180ºC/355ºF. The internal temperature should be at least 200 F/93 C.

4. Let breads cool completely on wire rack before slicing.

Saatenbrot - Many Seed Bread

 

 

 

Comments

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hi Karin,

That crumb is superb! Fantastic hearty looking breads ... and handsome too!

I have to say I am really enjoying the variety of bakes that the "Equal Opportunity Baking" is providing us.

Cheers,
Phil

hanseata's picture
hanseata

obviously has its rewards. This book is rather thin (they have some on pastry and tortes, too), and rather unconspicious behind Hamelman's and Whitley's tomes. I probably wouldn't have even thought looking at it, if I hadn't taken my shelf apart to find a recipe from each book.

Thanks, Phil,

Karin

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi Karin,

It looks very nice bread!!  Now I am liking to retard my dough for overnight :)  I didn't like it much when I baked the dough as soon as I take the dough out from the refrigerator.  I was surprised to see the difference of the taste when I proofed it more at the room temperature after retarding. 

I didn't like caraway before,, but now I really like the flavor..   I am going to put this recipe in my baking list :)

Thank you for sharing, Karin!

Akiko

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Akiko, and, please, let me know how it turns out.

Happy Baking,

Karin

ananda's picture
ananda

I am loving this theme you picked as well Karin,

It's been good to see a few seeded loaves posted here very recently.   I love the multiplicity in this formula and the subsequent appearance of the crumb.

Best wishes

Andy

hanseata's picture
hanseata

about the crumb, too, Andy.

And I noticed there is a real difference in taste, whether the sesame is toasted or not. I used not to bother with it, because the seed is so small, and I was afraid to burn it. This seed combination is especially pleasing. I have other formulas with hemp seed that I want to try, too.

Best wishes,

Karin

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Karin,
You find the most delicious-looking and interesting formulas.
What a combination of seeds - this bread must be so flavorful, and the seeds make for an absolutely gorgeous crust.
Thank you for finding, and sharing, this!
:^) from breadsong

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

And you are right. Since the seeds cover the loaf from all sides, and the layer is dense, the crust is really crunchy, in a very nice way.

Take care,

Karin

 

Syd's picture
Syd

Yes, this looks delicious Karin.  The perfect crumb for this type of bread.  I am favouriting this immediately and hope to try it out soon.  I have been wanting to make a loaf like this for a while and have been looking around for a suitable recipe.  This looks like a winner. 

Best,

Syd

hanseata's picture
hanseata

and I hope you will like this one, Syd. And, please, post about it, when you make it.

Happy Baking,

Karin

 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Very pretty loaves, Karin.  And tasty, too, I'm sure.

Paul

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Yes, this loaf is a very seedy individual - and the hemp seed addition, of course, dubious, too.

But we loved the taste - especially toasted.

Karin

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Or loaded?  Very nice bread hanseata,  One of the most handsome loves I have seen.  Nice work and the craftsmanship speaks for itself.  I'm not sure that folks should be blowing their hemp seeds on it though :-)  But, it might well be worth it since I bet they taste as good as they look!!!  Its's on my biucket list for sure.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

..... over my shoulder I asked in a low voice about hemp seed in the natural food store, hoping that nobody would overhear me....

No, I doubt that you could get high on this kind of hemp seed - or plant it for a little supply on the side :)

Thanks, Dabrownman,

Karin

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

HI Karin,

Okay, hemp seeds are now on my grocery list....hard to resist one of your loaves that looks this good...and wholesome :-)

I am enjoying the sharing of your cookbook library with us.  This bake really hits home as a loaf that is perfect for this time of year when our temps. are chilly and lots of energy goes into shoveling snow and simply keeping warm.  

Thanks for the post!
Take Care,

Janet 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Janet, you should feel very good about buying hemp seed - they contain all the 8 essential amino acids that the human body cannot produce. Also, it has a high content of unsaturated fatty acids, vitamins B1 and B2, vitamin E and calcium.

Moreover, as the "Allgemeine Bäckerzeitung" suggests (as sales argument): "Hemp is undoubtedly a trendy plant, especially for young, athletic and health conscious people".

So they must mean you and me! :)

Karin

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin,

:-)

I will tell my daughter, the aspiring ballerina, that they are better for her than all the enriched loaves she generally prefers...Maybe I can pull her over to the seeded side of the street....

Neighbors I bake for all love the seeded loaves I bake but still my own kids shy away from them....Husband likes them now so I am thinking it is simply a matter of time before they join him.  

This loaf of yours might just be the one to turn the tides.

Always the wishful 'baker' here :-)

Take Care,

Janet

hanseata's picture
hanseata

was the pickiest eater, didn't like bread at all. And my American stepdaughters didn't know darker bread, and were very hesitant trying it. But by now all of them love my breads. So, there is still hope!

By the way, Janet, since you grind your grains yourself - I don't know whether you can get medium rye kernels, but I'm sure you can do this bread with whole rye, too. Probably with a little more water.

Happy Baking,

Karin

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin,

Thanks for the tip using whole rye.  I will watch the water content.  Should it be a loose dough or have the consistency of one of PR's?

I am thinking that this has jumped to the top of my list and, if I can get to the store tomorrow, I will bake it on Thursday.  I give a loaf of bread to a woman who owns a local yarn shop on Thursdays and this type of bread is her favorite....

Take Care,

Janet

bread basket's picture
bread basket

Hi Karin, wunderschoenes Brot! I am curious, what is the reason for this kind of baking?  Barbara

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Janet, when I only soaked the flaxseeds and most of the flour was added to the final dough, it was so sticky that I decided to rather use a soaker à la Reinhart, with more flour prefermented, instead of doing S & Fs. The final dough will be surely more sticky than tacky. It was still a bit sticky the next morning, but could be shaped.

You can see from the crumb that the dough was well hydrated, so, if you use whole rye, keep an eye on it, better "wrestling with stickiness" than having it too dry.

Let me know how it turns out,

Karin

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Danke, Barbara!

I found those falling temperatures in several German recipes for rye breads, but didn't know why this method was used.

In Martin Pöt Stoldt's book "Der Sauerteig - das unbekannte Wesen" I found an explanation - it emulates baking with a wood fired oven! The falling temperatures mimic the slow drop in temperature of a stone oven that is first fired up, and then, when the ambers and ashes are removed, slowly cools down, while the breads bake on the heated stones.

When I first tried baking with falling temperatures I was amazed at the terrific crust - crisp, but thin.

Try it out for yourself, you will be very pleased,

Karin

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin,

THanks for the notes on the consistency.  Gives me an idea of what to feel for tomorrow.

I am going to mix up the soaker tonight and will follow your quantities tho' I am toying with adding a bit of altus.

I decided to keep the soaker and the leaven apart until the final dough in the morning because if I had mixed a leaven and a soaker both this morning and then combined them this evening and then allowed them to ferment all night in the refrig. I was afraid I would end up with too sour of an end 'product'.  

I know you have said that when you mix yours like you have described above there isn't much flavor difference then when kept separate in the way I intend to do today but every time I try a dough that way the comments I get are that there is definitely a more sour flavor.

The only reason I can come up with for this difference and your experience is that I am using freshly milled whole grains and that they need less time in a soaker/final dough mix but it really puzzles me....I hate it when I can't figure things out!!!

Anyway, I will keep you posted on the results.

Before I close....I did indeed get the hemp seeds today  - 8.00 for an 8oz. bag.  Is that what you pay?  I only found them in one store where I shop and I went ahead and got them and will just use a bit less in the recipe.  Will search later for a less expensive source.  Do you have a less expensive source or is this just the normal price?

Again, thanks for the helpful pointers :-)

Janet

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

You got them cheaper than I did - I paid 10.79 for 8 oz. in our natural food store. But I just checked - it seems you can get them much cheaper at nuts.com: 2.99/lb (plus shipping, of course).

Take care,

Karin

 

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin,

Thanks for the link.  I was going to order just 1 lb. but the shipping cost for 2lbs wasn't that much different so I ordered 2lbs. which dropped the price down considerably....From 1.00 an ounce to about 45¢ an ounce

I figure with that many hemp seeds I can either get rich by selling them by the ounce on the streets...

or I can simply put them in the freezer and consider myself lucky to have a life time supply of hemp seeds under my roof :-)

Tomorrow's loaves will not lack ANY hemp seeds *-]

Take Care,

Janet

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin,

Well, the loaves were baked today and I have a few questions.

My dough was very co-dependent.  It wanted to stick to the bowl but once I freed it from the bowl it latched onto the scraper and then onto the bench knife and the my bread board and, most of all, it wanted to stick to my hands despite the water I splashed all over them....

I am glad you told me it would be sticky or I would have run from the kitchen.....

First question is about the spices.  I added 2g of the 3 spices combined but that seemed like too small of an amount.  Was I supposed to use 2g of each spice I used for a total of 6g of spices?

Second question:  Once I was able to separate the dough from my hands it most definitely did not shape like a 'regular' pan loaf....I more or less had to mold it - similar to what I do with your Leinsenmanbrot.  My final loaves had flat tops yet yours are rounded....Is that because you proofed the entire dough overnight?  (I did the leaven and soaker separate overnight and combined this morning ala PR because I was afraid of over fermenting with the fresh grains....)  I did end up adding about 1/4 a cup extra flour because, as you can imagine, the dough also wanted to stick to the bottom and the sides of the mixer  :-0.

I didn't get to do the falling temps. and really wanted to but I had to pick up my son at the library right when it was time for the loaf to be baked.....I am anxious to give that method a try.

For me this was a great learning loaf in that it similar to your Friesan Rye but the procedure is totally different - as you well know. I have read a lot about pre-fermented flour amounts in different loaves and understood the concept to a point but this loaf really opened a whole new level of understanding as to what that means.  

Both of the Friesan and this loaf have similar water content and rye content...I think the rye% is a bit more in this one but I could be wrong and don't have the recipe in front of me to check.  The difference is in the procedure where most all of the flour is pre-fermented over various stages in the Friesian.  It was very interesting to really see the difference that makes in a loaf.  This loaf did have 'body' - albeit was sticky as all get out -whereas the Friesian dough turns almost to a liquid by the time it is ready to bake...now I 'get it' because I have 'done it' - seeing/doing is believing.

I have given the loaves away and am waiting anxiously to hear back about the flavor as well as the texture.  

From my point of reference this recipe is a winner!  The aroma while baking was wonderful.  The seed combo was so complementary of each other.  Only thing I would change is the spice amount so more of those flavors shine through.  I might try it the way you prepared the soaker and leaven at the same time and see what happens....I just don't want to wake up to a puddle of dough but, figure if I do,  I can always treat it like the Friesian dough and simply pour it into the bread pans :-)

Anyway,  thanks for another winning wonderful bread and the lesson it finally taught me.

Take Care,

Janet

hanseata's picture
hanseata

You probably have to use a little less water in order to get it a bit less sticky, since you should be able to roll the dough up (on a floured work bench). But it definitely was a sticky dough, and I had to wrestle with it, too.

And, your freshly milled flour really seems to react differently than store bought one. (Before I buy a grain mill, I will certainly ask you more specifically about your observations how to deal with fresh ground flour.)

The amount of spices is a total 2 g - the original recipe says only: "Brotgewürz" = bread spices. Anise, caraway, fennel and coriander are the typical German bread spices, you can mix them as you like, and if you like a stronger taste, you can always take more.

No matter whether shaped or not, if you bake it in a loaf pan, it will be contained, and the taste will be nice whether domed top or "flat roof".

Happy Baking,

Karin

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin,

Thanks for the feed back.  I will increase flour the next bake and leave the spice alone.

Found out today why the hemp from the link you posted is less expensive - it is not hulled.  The expensive ones I bought at my local store were hulled - or what they labeled as 'hearts'.  I came home and checked the photo on the site and, sure enough, the ones I ordered have the hull on them.  No big deal - adds fiber and a nice crunch but I imagine after a night in the refrigerator mixed in a dough there will be little crunch left.  I am thinking the texture will be similar to millet or poppy seeds.

Take Care,

Janet

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

but where do I get hemp seeds ?  Sounds so 60ish ;)

anna

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Anna, I bought my package (feeling slightly wary) at the natural food store I sell my breads to, but I'm sure they have it at Whole Foods, too. You might also check online, "Nuts online" and others sell hemp seeds, too. The ones I got are hulled, but I don't think it matters to much if they are whole, since you soak them with the dough overnight, anyway.

Happy Baking,

Karin

 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I like Nuts Online and also need more fennel.

ty

mendozer's picture
mendozer

This looks great. I'm trying to replicate Dave's Good Seed Bread.  This looks very close. However, I also have a good barm started so i figure I'd use that.  Would you substitute the sourdough starter with rye starter 1:1? 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

but I did say that you were the 'Queen of Seeds'  on another blog?

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Yes, Mendozer, the mother starter amount, 21 g, is so small that it doesn't matter too much what kind of starter you use, as long as it's lively. If your starter is less hydrated - you always have to check the consistency of the final dough, anyway, and can always add a little water, if necessary.

Karin

 

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Dabrownman, I always considered myself a rye-hard, but you are welcome to call me "Queen of Seeds" - as long as you don't call me seedy :)

Karin

SLKIRK's picture
SLKIRK

the recipe as i read it never mentions when to add the soaker -- i assume it will be added along with the leven into the final dough --- am i correct?

thanks,

 

SLKIRK

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Of course it should be added with the starter to the final dough. I edited my post accordingly.

Thanks for letting me know, SLKIRK!

Karin