The Fresh Loaf

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Hamelman's Bread - what is your favourite bread form it?

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Gingi's picture
Gingi

Hamelman's Bread - what is your favourite bread form it?

So far I tried the Vermont sourdough (and I'm a bit disappointment, but it's probably problems in my end).... are there any recipes in the book you believe are amazing, fantastic breads? share with me.

Thanks.

 

Gingi's picture
Gingi

...my message appeared in triplicates... I didn't mean to do it and I don't know how to delete posts... sorry.

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Gingi I wonder why you were disappointed with the Vermont Sourdough? It is one of the basic loaves often recommended to newcomers to sourdough. One assumes that you tried it because you thought you would like it. It maybe worth your while to make it a few more times, you will learn a lot by doing so. If you share clearly what the disappointment was, I am sure others here familiar with the formula will lend a hand, to help you achieve the results you hope for.

You might also be better to tell us what kind of bread you like, then we can suggest which formula to try.

Everything I have made from the book I have really liked,  my favourite to date is the 5 grain Levain.

Gingi's picture
Gingi

I have a conversation open on Artisan Baking forum about the things that go wrong with Vermont. Check it there Long story short - big ugly bubble and gluteny heavy texture tat I can't get rid of. And no, it's not my starer or my shaping.

 

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

I took a look. Have you followed Mini O's recommendation with regard bulk fermentation? You did not respond to her.  Until you learn to watch the dough not the clock, it won't matter what formula you try, you will struggle. Patience is one of the most important ingredients in making sourdough. 

It may help you to think of the bulk fermentation period as being the phase when the yeast population is built up within your dough. It is also the time, if you are using stretch and fold methods, to develop the gluten sufficiently. With ample yeast ready to work and sufficently developed gluten, during the proofing stage your dough will then be able to form thousands and thousands of gas filled alveoli.

Looking at those big holes it may be that you think that there is ample gas production. Rather than concentrating on the big holes, take a look at the bread crumb in between the larger holes in a beautifully developed loaf of bread, you will see a myriad of holes of all sizes. That is what you  are aiming for.

By stretching and folding during the earlier stages of bulk fermentation you redistribute food to the bugs, you also even out the temperature within the dough helping keep the bugs at a temperature they grow best at, you also help develop the gluten and the degassing that occurs removes the gas which is not needed at this stage, think of it as waste which stops the bugs getting at their food, during the time you want them to be multiplying.

Please reread Mini O's recommendation. 

And don't hesitate to ask more questions.

Also I trust you have read all the material in Mr Hamelman's book, not just gone straight to the formula. The material in the front section should be read and re-read, the more you bake the more you will understand what he is teaching you. The short section headed Baking at Home is very helpful.  And of course the introduction to the levain section mustn't be missed either. If you find anything hard to understand come back here and ask.

 

Gingi's picture
Gingi

but not globally, yes via PM. we're trying to solve the problems together.

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Pay heed, she's a great teacher, your sourdough struggles will soon be a thing of the past.

Have fun!

twcinnh's picture
twcinnh

Also I trust you have read all the material in Mr Hamelman's book, not just gone straight to the formula. The material in the front section should be read and re-read, the more you bake the more you will understand what he is teaching you. The short section headed Baking at Home is very helpful.  And of course the introduction to the levain section mustn't be missed either. If you find anything hard to understand come back here and ask.

Strongly agree with this; go back again and again.  The first time I read this I found it confusing but found this section very well worth going over and over after a few more months.  Matter of fact, I've some time today.

Regards,

 

Tom C

twcinnh's picture
twcinnh

I love the 60% rye (with caraway, walnuts, sunflower seeds; whatever).

Regards,

 

Tom C

asicign's picture
asicign

This is the book I always look to first.  I've probably made Vermont Sourdough more times than any other recipe, but this week I baked a few loaves of Semolina with soaker.  It was absolutely fantastic.  Finally got a good crust, and the flavor was outstanding.

asicign's picture
asicign

This is the book I always look to first.  I've probably made Vermont Sourdough more times than any other recipe, but this week I baked a few loaves of Semolina with soaker.  It was absolutely fantastic.  Finally got a good crust, and the flavor was outstanding.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

let's take some of your oldest starter, a mature starter that's been sitting around a while, put it into a container with a loose lid, say 50g and warm it up to yeasty temps between 75°and 80°.  Don't feed it, maybe cover with a little cooled boiled water and let it just ferment until it starts to fall apart getting (hopefully) good and yeasty smelling with time.  After it starts smelling beery (I don't expect any rise but there should be bubbles)  one heaping tablespoon of flour and enough water to cover.  After 8 hrs, remove cultures sample and feed 1:1:1 and wait for a rise.  At peak, remove 20g and feed again 1:1:1.  let it peak and then feed again. (repeat)  Now I'll be hoping the rises are getting faster.     (So that gives us two or three to watch and take notes.) Pop quiz in 10 days.  :)

I don't have my book with me but I seem to remember there's a blue cheese loaf that is very good.  I've marked a few recipes.  Be sure you correct errata and site search various recipes.  Lots of tips in here.   

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Gingi,  I love the Baguette with the 30% poolish ( though I have adapted it to 100% whole wheat ) and the pain au levian came out great as well. I use Bread the 2nd edition.  

golgi70's picture
golgi70

My favorite is the Miche.  I've only a tried a few loaves tit for tat though.  This one though is out of this world.  So good and has excellent keeping qualities.  In fact it improves with age.  Note:  Subbing the High Extraction with White and Wheat does not do this loaf justice.  True High Extraction Flour is when i fell in love with this.  So fricken good

 

Josh

Gingi's picture
Gingi

on what page is it?

   
merlie's picture
merlie

We just LOVE the Toast Bread on page 298. Used all Bread Flour as I have no idea where to get high gluten flour. (His formula asks for 50/50 ) I believe my bread flour is 13%.  I had only used my small pullman pan once before with results that were not too good. Amazing the difference it makes when one is told how much  dough to put in the pan - 1.5pounds ! It was perfect and the toast made with it wonderful. I have not had toast like that since growing up in England. I have also made The Buttermilk bread , Pain au Levain, Golden Raisin Bread and the Olive Levain . This last one I had trouble with. I found it very difficult to incorporate the whole olives ( and they all wanted to leave when it came to stretch and fold time ! ) I'd love to try the Miche but do not know where to get high extraction flour here in British Columbia.

Merlie

Gingi's picture
Gingi

thanks merlie

hanseata's picture
hanseata

is my favorite, so far. I have baked it several times already.

Karin