The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sprouted Wheat Country Bread

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breaducation's picture
breaducation

Sprouted Wheat Country Bread

I have been on a bit of a country bread kick lately but I’m always trying to mix it up. For my latest variation I’ve replaced the typical 10% whole wheat flour in a country bread with 15% sprouted wheat.

Although I don’t have that much experience using sprouted grains it’s something that has always intrigued me. Mainly because of the purported health benefits but also because of the delicious flavor.

For one thing, when you use a sprouted grain like wheat you are using the entire grain. At this point it’s already much more nutritious than white flour but not any better than your average whole wheat flour. What causes sprouted grains to excel so greatly in nutrition is the activation of enzymes in the sprouting process. These enzymes breakdown some starches before they get to your body making bread made from these grains easier to digest. The sprouting also increases levels of some vitamins and protein.

On top of all these nutritional advantages sprouted wheat also tastes great! It is much more sweet tasting than whole wheat flour and doesn’t have any of the bitterness. It’s these flavors that led me to the idea of trying sprouted wheat in a country bread.

The finished loaf had outstanding flavor! It was quite sweet from the sprouted wheat and very mildly sour probably from making it as a straight dough instead of retarding. I feel like I could increase the sprouted wheat to 25-35% of dough weight and still get a great mild sprouted wheat flavor. If I went that high with normal whole wheat it would dominate the flavor and have that bitter whole wheat taste. I think I’m going to be using sprouted wheat a lot more often in my breads.

For the formula, process and more photos visit aBreaducation.

Comments

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Surprisingly white crumb, given its 15% processed sprouted wheat.

What was the hydration of that 73.77 gr levain - stiff? liquid?

Thanks for posting.  Definitely one to try.

Tom

 

breaducation's picture
breaducation

I too was very surprised by how white the crumb came out. The sprouted wheat is almost invisible in it, something that contributes to my belief that you could add quite a bit more sprouted wheat and still end up with a fairly light bread.

The hydration for the levain is liquid.

jefklak's picture
jefklak

That's one good loaking loaf you baked there! I've never tasted sprouted wheat in a bread before, indeed a good idea, I wonder what will happen to the crumb structure if you increase the wheat amount as I'm not a big fan of very white bread. Thanks for sharing!

P.S. Your website looks very promising, I hope a lot of good stuff appears soon!

breaducation's picture
breaducation

You should definitely try out some sprouted wheat, it really is a wonderful flavor and pretty fun to work with. I intend to push the sprouted wheat in my next bake so I will definitely find out what happens with the crumb. I'm guessing it will get a little tighter, much like adding whole wheat.

Thanks for the encouragment on the website, I'm doing my best to add content but it's a bit slow going as I'm baking full time during the day professionally. I'm looking to get a few more lessons up and hopefully some new online baking tools soon. Stay tuned!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

grains in bread either as flour, sprout add ins and making diastatic and nondiastatic malt.  All give some benefits either to the taste, color, digestability, nutrition, sweetness, starch coversion to sugar and keeping qualities of the bread.  Your bread is a fantastic example of some of them.  Nice baking.

breaducation's picture
breaducation

I think I'm starting to fall in love with sprouted grains. I just think there is so much potential with them and they are sort of the best of all worlds: great flavor and extremely healthy.

I'm curious how you go about making malt out of the sprouted grains? Care to explain?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of my posts on making red rye nondiastatic malt.  It is as close to making it at home as I can manage since we can't take a foot deep and a foot high long rows of the sprouted grain and malt them naturally.  By heating over 158 F the enzymatic action is destroyed so no help to converting starches to sugars for the yeast to eat.  But we also make white diastatic malt where the temperature is kept at no more than 150 F and the enzymes are still available to convert the starch into sugar for the yeast.

The red helps the color of the crust and the keeping properties of the bread and the white does it's starch conversion thing.  We also use the sprouts as shown without any drying  for as add ins to the bread - just because we like the texture, nuttiness and enzymatic action they too provide.  Makes for much healthier bread.

It's another bread addiction :-)

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27954/making-red-rye-malt

breaducation's picture
breaducation

Wow thanks so much! This look like great info. Now I've got even more ideas to play with.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Very attractive looking loaf, Breaducation! It must taste great! I also love the slash opening. Crumb looks airy and light. 

Lovely loaf!

ml's picture
ml

One of the new breads developed by Chad Robertson is.......sprouted Tartine hearth loaf!

You are on it! 

 

breaducation's picture
breaducation

I really need to stop by there again soon. I keep hearing about all these new breads he's trying. I've got to get my hands on one. Thanks for the info!

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello,
Wow, does your sprouted wheat loaf ever look good!
I've baked with sprouted wheat flour from my local organic mill a couple of times over the last month and absolutely loved how the bread tasted; I'm with you re: resulting flavor, using this flour :^)  

@ml, I am reposting your link to Chad Robertson's article about sprouted grains in Food Arts magazine - in case the OP might like to read it:
http://www.foodarts.com/news/features/15955/the-baker-in-the-rye
(thanks for posting that link - what an interesting article!)
:^) breadsong

 

 

breaducation's picture
breaducation

Thanks for the link to that article! I definitely like the direction he's going with his breads. Also, being of Norwegian descent, I found the whole thing facinating. I would really like to travel to the Scandinavian countries one day and try some of their breads first hand. I might have to start working on my own rugbrød soon. Thanks!

-Jorgen

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Jorgen,
I looked around a little further on the Food Arts website and found Chad Robertson's formula for a Danish-Style Rye Bread (Rugbrøt):
http://www.foodarts.com/recipes/recipes/15988/danishstyle-rye-bread-rugbrt

The list of ingredients sounds wonderful - I want to start working on this bread, too!
:^) breadsong

 

breaducation's picture
breaducation

It seems like a very interesting formula. I really like the idea of combining beer and rye together. I'm curious what the flavor of it will be. I've always heard that you should keep fermentation on rye breads pretty short because they become very acidic with a longer fermentation but Robertson really extends it in this one. I'm definitely going to have to try this!

smignogna's picture
smignogna

NICE! have you explored using sprouted flours anymore in your breads? I'd be interested in knowing what you found out....

steve