The Fresh Loaf

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Sourdough bread sticks to my proofing tin

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sumedocin's picture
sumedocin

Sourdough bread sticks to my proofing tin

Hi everyone. I've been having issues with my sourdough sticking to the tin that i let it rise in.

The recipe I'm using constitutes:

300ml starter(100% hydration, fed 7-8 hours before using)

200ml water

500g gram flour

1 tsp salt

Rising times:

1st rise - 2 hours

2nd rise - approx 6-8 hours

The problem that i have is after the 2nd rise, trying to tip the dough into the oven. The dough just sticks to the tin. I've tried dusting the tin with flour, oiling and even lining the tin with baking paper, the dough still sticks. Is there a problem with my proportions and rise time?

I live in singapore where it's way humid and the average day temperature all year round is 32 C, even when it rains.

Farmpride's picture
Farmpride

let me ask, does the bread come out real dense? and..the sticking, do you mean when it is raw or after it is baked?

i will assume our talking about turning the bread our of the mold to go into the oven..if so, avoid using oils with the flour in the mold, that may make it stick, use a wooden bowl or other slopping sided mold with flour and or corn meal only.  also, are you putting "seeds" or other topping on it before you to turn over to go to the oven? if so the egg wash or water you use to stick the topping to it is maybe causing you a problem.  one other idea would be to get a cake pan or even a nice bowl and leave the bread in and bake it in that, and it should come out easy then, and avoid oil in the mold, a very light coat of shorting (no butter as it has water) is preferable to me, but a nice baking spray works ok too. again ..if you are talking about turning the bread out of the mold raw, get a mold that needs no oil, just flour and or corn meal....IS your bread loaf to weak to just proof on a floured board?

albert,

farmpride.com

sumedocin's picture
sumedocin

Thanks for the reply. there are various scenarios to the sticking. With oil, flour and baking parchment, the dough sticks when i tip it out raw into the oven. with baking directly on the parchment causes the parchment to stick to the cooked bread after baking. and no i do not put any seeds as toppings. My dough kinda rises side ways when free formed, so i would think the loaf is too weak to proof on its own.

Heath's picture
Heath

I line the tin with with a muslin cloth (I think a clean tea towel would work too) and coat generously with rice flour.  No problems with sticking any more.

A rise of 6-8 hours at 32 C seems too long for that percentage of starter in my experience (especially if your first rise only takes 2 hours).  Could it be over-proved?

Also, if your recipe is correct, I calculate the hydration to be 54%, which is too low really.

sumedocin's picture
sumedocin

Thanks for the reply. I too suspect that the 2nd rise is abit too long. My dough is really wet and rises side ways rather that upwards when free formed, so i don't think uping the hydration anymore would help. So i should proof it for a shorter time?(2nd rise)

Heath's picture
Heath

You should watch the dough and not the clock for proofing.  One way to tell when it's ready is the finger poke test, as described in this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oAfl1u0fIw

Most people swear by this method.

This doesn't really work on my sourdough, though, so what I did was to get a golf ball sized piece of dough (before shaping), put it in a straight-sided glass, and put the glass with the rest of the dough when proofing.  Mark the glass with a line where the dough starts and one at twice the height where the dough would have doubled in volume.  You can tell when it's proofed correctly when the dough reaches about 90% of doubled.  Bake your dough at this time (you can also bake the small piece of dough so it doesn't go to waste).  After doing this, you'll have a much better idea when your dough is ready to bake.  I now know when my dough's ready by the height of the dough in my proofing tin.

If you bake a lot of different sized loaves, getting to grips with the finger poke test would be a better option, though, because you don't want to do the glass trick every time you bake.

chris319's picture
chris319

Is your dough being properly kneaded?

sumedocin's picture
sumedocin

Thanks for the reply. I knead my dough for about 15 mins?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

You could easily double the salt amount, this will help you control the run away yeast fermentation.   Heath gave some excellent tips and tricks.  I do think your fermentation is too fast.  Your dough sounds more like a ripe starter.   For your heat, humidity and large portion of starter, and low portion of salt, the loaf will be fermenting fast and ready to bake in just a few hours.  

As soon as the dough shows signs of puffing up, fold it to build dough strength.  Search: Stretch and Fold     

When your dough starts to rise more sideways than up (appox every 30 min)   stretch and fold it again.  Watch and feel how this is shaping up your wet dough.   May take anywhere from 3 to 5 folds or more until you stop, tuck under the corners and let the dough rise for half an hour before baking.  

Fermentation will first help you with the dough and later hinder your progress with it.  You have to decide when to bake the bread dough before fermentation gets the upper hand turning your dough into a sticky wet blob.  Sourdough dough does tend to get wetter as it ferments and loosen up more that is why playing, stretching and folding the dough during the bulk rising is so important.

Make sure you are using baking parchment and not decorative baking wrapping paper.  Baking parchment will stick to wet dough but release easily while baking.  When the bread is baked, it no longer sticks.  

Heath's picture
Heath

I remember that I got the dough in the glass trick from you (and probably many others too).

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

else as well.  A handy tool worth passing on.  :)