The Fresh Loaf

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60 Percent Whole Multigrain Sourdough with Sprouts, Seeds & Yogurt Whey

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

60 Percent Whole Multigrain Sourdough with Sprouts, Seeds & Yogurt Whey

Lucy figured it was time to get back to baking the kind of bread that she likes but I reminded her we still have a couple of half loaves of SD pumpernickel in the freezer along with some white breads and who knows what else.

 

So we compromised by baking one of my favorite kind of breads - even though I like them all.  This one is a 60% mix of 8 whole grains, sourdough, has oat and potato in it along with home made red and white malts and sprouts, honey, pumpkin, sunflower, flax and sesame seeds.   The liquid is a mix of excess sprout soaker water but mainly yogurt whey.

 

Even though rye chits in 24 hours, the rest of the grains take 48 hours to chit when making sprouts so you need to start the sprouting at the same time as the SD levain if you want to have it ready when you mix the dough 48 hours later if you want to refrigerate the levain for 24 hours after the 3rd stage feeding.

 

We always have yogurt whey on hand since we regularly make our own but if you buy a quart of the cheapest plain yogurt at the store and drain it in the fridge for 4 hours, through a colander with a sheet of paper towel in the bottom, you will make really expensive Greek yogurt and have whey for your bread too.  A twofer if there ever was one.

 

Per our new normal using a heating pad in the winter, we made the SD levain over 3 stages from our whole multigrain 66% starter that had been undisturbed for 4 weeks in the fridge getting sourer by the day in the cold.  The first stage was 3 hours where it rose 25% and the 2nd stage was right at 4 hours before it doubled.

 

We then fed it the 3rd time and after it rose 25% after about an hour we then refrigerated it for 24 hours.  The next day it was placed back on the heating pad and allowed to double, which took about 3 hour,s while we autolysed the rest of the dry, less the seeds and salt.  We held back little bit of whey to dissolve the salt to add in later.

 

After out last bake that was too wet and the dough spread, we decided that this bread would be better at 81% hydration including the add ins.  After everything was mixed we let it sit for half and hour.  The dough certainly felt and performed better that the last bake and was still wet enough to do the 3 sets of slap and folds of 8, 1.and 1minutes  without difficulty.

 

3 sets of stretch and folds were done on 20 minute intervals where the ground sesame and flax, pumpkin and sunflower and sprouts were incorporated on the first 3 and evenly distributed by the 4th one.  Once everything was in the dough, we shaped it in to a ball and put it in the fridge for a 12 hour retard in bulk like Ian or Peter Reinhart would do.

 

By the next morning it had doubled in the fridge and we put the dough on the heating pad to warm up for 1 ½ hours before shaping it into a boule and putting it seam side down in a rice floured basket to final proof so that we could bake it upside down with out slashing and letting the bread crack at the seams as it sprang in the oven.

 

Yes ,it's a BLT - very special since we only have a couple a year.

After 1 3/4 hours we fired up Big Old Betsy and let it hit 500 F and stay there for 20 minutes to let the top and bottom stones catch up.  This time we decided to bake this bread on the bottom stone while covering it with or Goodwill $1 aluminum Dutch oven bottom as a cloche.

 

As soon as the bread was overturned onto parchment on a peel and slid into the oven and covered with hot preheated cloche, the temperature was turned down to 475 F for the 18 minutes the bread was steamed with its own steam.

 

Once the lid came off, the oven was turned down to 425 F convection this time and the inside hit 203 F right at 12 minutes later when the oven was turned off.  Total baking time was 30 minutes for this smallish loaf. 

 

Once the bread hit 205 F we opened the door of the oven, leaving it ajar and let bread sit on the hot stone till the bread hit 207 F on the inside when it was removed to the cooling rack.  It sprang and browned very well and cracked handsomely.  The crust was very crunchy when it came out of the oven too.  The crumb was fairly open for a bread so high in whole grains, sprouts and seeds.  It was a medium well for sour because of the whey and there are lots of bits in the crumb.  The crust stayed a little crisp and was boldly baked just the way we like it.  Between the fine flavor of the crust and crumb that is nutty, tangy and deep, there isn't much not to like about this fine bread.  It would be a fine candidate for Lucy's DaPumperizing method.

 

 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

20

0

0

20

5.73%

Whole Multigrain Mix

16

24

40

80

22.92%

Water

16

24

40

80

22.92%

Total

52

48

80

180

51.58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multigrain Mix

90

25.79%

 

 

 

Sprout Soaker Water

90

25.79%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

130

37.25%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

12

3.44%

 

 

 

Whole Multigrain Mix

117

33.52%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

259

74.21%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

2.01%

 

 

 

Yogurt Whey

200

57.31%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

77.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration w/ starter

83.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

349

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker Water 82 & Whey

290

83.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

81.31%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

60.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

841

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Honey

12

3.44%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

0.86%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.86%

 

 

 

Pumpkin & Sunflower Seeds

40

11.46%

 

 

 

G. Flax, G Sesame Seed

25

7.16%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

12

3.44%

 

 

 

Total

95

27.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multigrain Berries

100

28.65%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Mulitgrain Mix is: barley, emmer, Kamut,

 

 

 

spelt, rye, oat, buckwheat and wheat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60% whole grain does not include the whole

 

 

 

grain soaker.  It is 70% with the soalker.

 

 

 

 

Comments

dosco's picture
dosco

.. do you have a crumb shot?

:)

-Dave

PS: Love the desert sunsets!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We like this bread a lot and it has most of the stuff we like in bread except Toadies!  Glad you like it and

Happy Baking

 

Bakingmadtoo's picture
Bakingmadtoo

That is a seriously good looking loaf! It seems like a long process even by sourdough standards. I struggle to think so far ahead. But it is obviously worth it.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

now after being an alien encounter of the 3rd kind.  I suppose it we want in our bread bad enough, we will do just about anything to get it in there.  We make a lot of out own condiments, sausages, cheeses, yogurt, jam etc and are used to doing it the hard way - even though, thankfully,  none of it is very hard to do.  Luckily, it  is usually a fun thing to do too.  If you aren't having fun doing it after giving it a serious go,  it is probably time to do something else.  That is why I'm retired :-)  

Glad you like the bread - it is a tasty one just full of stuff,

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

I always know when I see seeds, sprouts, whey YW or stuff like that in the title, dabrownman has been working up another miracle!!! Beautiful bread, beautiful salad, beautiful Sunset... Life is good DAB... and you are rockin' it!

Diane

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the recipes that Lucy dreams up!  She is looking pretty guilty, even in her current sleep on the ottoman.   She is probably dreaming up another bread chock full of who knows what:-)  Glad you like the post Diane -  we love the bread.  Life truly is very good and we are all lucky to live in the right place at the right time in our lives - even though some of us suffer apprentice fatigue and occasional ankle biting......

We love this time of year and hardly have time to do much of anything when it is beer making, gardening and being outside weather with an occasional infrequent sunset.

Happy baking Diane and we look forward to the next  GMA bake!  

isand66's picture
isand66

Perfect.  Love that crumb and nice Brownman crust.  Way to go Lucy and DA!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread with lots of sour and other stuff hanging out,  Very healthy and hearty ... which is the real goal around here when  no one is looking,. 

Hope your job search goes well and we look forward to your next bake.- the last one will be hard to beta but Lucy thinks Max will help you come through again.

I've got some Young's double chocolate stout and Baltica porter burning a hole in the fridge - keep forgetting that is is supposed to get in some bead,  some time.  Using up the last of the rolls tonight and have baby back ribs in the fridge under a  dry rub for the traditional Superbowl Ribs Smoke out which is way more important than the game.

Happy Baking Ian - AND YOUR 6  APPRENTICES!

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Another great Bake Dab.

Cheers,

Wingnut

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread Wing. It is a very hearty loaf and tasty too!

Happy Baking Wing 

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

My goodness that looks like one healthy loaf !  It's the bready equivalent of a traditional Cornish Pasty in the sense that it's an entire meal in itself.  Multigrain, sprouts, potato, whey, honey, pumpkin, sunflower, flax, sesame seeds.  I can only imagine what it tastes like . . . actually I can't, I'm quite jealous!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and the kind we like the best - just full of our favorites.  These kinds of breads are very deep in flavor and tang too.  Can't buy a loaf like this one anywhere plus I couldn't afford it if we could find it.  I prefer the scald to the sprouts but sprouts are healthier:-)  You would like this one EP.

Happy Baking

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

breaded seeds?  Can't quite tell from here. '-)

Looks lovely and delicious, either way.

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Some of those fine rye beads get over 100 % seeds.  I really did  think about putting in some arpomatice seeds usully used I rye bread but Lucy forgot.  They would have been an fine addition and will get on there some day.  Glad ypu like the bread Paul and

Happy Baking

dosal's picture
dosal

multigrain berries? I have multigrain flakes from Red Mill, but understand that these vanish in a bread. I guess I could grind them and use as flour.

This is my kind of bread as well, even though I definitely still have problems with high hydration doughs.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

rye, wheat, farro (einkorn, emmer and spelt), Durum, oat, amaranth, millet, buckwheat from either Whole Foods, Sprouts( is dropping many of these)  or Winco (WW only)

Because the whole grains are home ground and very thirsty, this isn't a very wet dough - feels like about a 70% white bread.

dosal's picture
dosal

another year or two for a whole foods store in our area. The other names are totally unknown to me.

David could you clarify G.flax and G. sesame. Is that golden flax and golden sesame or ground flax and ground sesame?

Right now I have spelt, wheat and rye soaking. I hope they will sprout by tomorrow. I started the wheat and spelt yesterday. 

I believe I will try using the multigrain flakes in the autolyse. I hope your are right about the hydration being manageable. I am rethinking the flakes right now and may make a medley of wheat, rye, spelt, quinoa, and maybe millet. I can grind my own this way. I have plenty of kefir whey ( I make the latter myself with raw milk).

If you ever want to venture into making your own kefir, just let me know and I will send you some grains. They multiply like crazy for me. I used to make yoghurt but learned that there are more probiotics in kefir. It is extremely easy to make, just drop a Tbsp into a quart of milk, cover and let stand for 24 hours. It's even faster in the summer.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

laying them out on damp paper towels, top and bottom on a cutting board and cover with plastic wrap to keep the little bit of moisture in.  Cover it all with a kitchen to keep light out.  I re-moisten the top paper towel every 24 hours.  If you have a sprouter cup that would work fine after the intitial soak.  If you just soak them they will drown.  The G is for ground.  They are really a coarse cop or meal rather than ground.  Whole flax can't be digested by folks and just past through your system - so might as well not put them in if not ground up a little.

Sprouts and Winco are west coast grocery chains. Kefir sounds great if better than yogurt.  I will check it out and let you know.

Happy Baking

dosal's picture
dosal

the grains are in a multi tiered sprouter. I've made plenty of flax bread by soaking the seed in boiling water and letting stand overnight. It gets mucilanious and becomes digestable. I am going to give the flakes a try first. I ground them up a bit coarse. Well, other than potato flakes I am in business and will give this a try tomorrow. Wish me luck!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

upcoming bake.  You will like your version of this bread for sure.  You can use boiled regular potatoes, or steamed ones) but they tend to be very wet (80% water or more) and it is harder to control the hydration but easy enough to compensate for with a little math.  Will look forward to your post!

Happy Baking

dosal's picture
dosal

added about a Tbsp of Backferment since that raises any kind of dough (other than high hydration once it collapses). You can bake a rice loaf with that.

I slapped that dough for about half an hour it seems and it still was wayyyy too wet. Not only did it stick like crazy I managed to get bits and pieces all over my kitchen floor. They just flew off when I slapped. Then I decided to go with s + f, well, you can imagine how that would stick, so I floured the board and my hands, tried TXfarmer's method of letting the dough extend by holding it in my hands, it promptly ripped. So back to the board. I added at least half a cup of AP flour and still it stuck like glue. I did 5 S+F incorporating the sprouts slowly into the last three folds. The dough doubled after every S+F within 45 minutes. In the end I oiled a plastic salad container and let it rise in there. When I turned it over the whole mess collapsed. I baked it anyway since the Backferment dough should be kept warm. My pressure oven only goes to 450F. I sealed that up tight with a stainless bowl over the top and tiles pre-heated at the bottom and the dough spread sideways. Did I let it rise too often? I would take a picture, but you probably don't want to see this beauty. I don't know how in the middle of a thread anyway, since I only have pictures on my pc.

dosal's picture
dosal

Here it is:

dosal's picture
dosal

Where is it? I resized to 25% that didn't take, then I tried a thumbnail and still no luck

dosal's picture
dosal

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Backferment to find out what it is.  This recipe has 60% fresh milled whole grains that are very thirsty - nothing at all like store bought whole grains in bags that aren't nearly as thirsty.  The hydration is no where near what I would call a wet one.  When we started doing the slap and folds it was too dry and added in some whey just so we could do the slap and folds without having to slap twice and fold once:-)

This is why we like slap and folds so much to develop the gluten.  In less than a minute you can usually tell if the dough is too dry because the slapping and folding won't work at all.   If it is wet, I don't like to add any more liquid until we have done 4 minutes worth of slapping and folding,  But if by then, it isn't started to come together. it is time to slowly add some flour so that at the 8 minute mark the dough is no longer sticking to the counter and flying all over the place.

Flakes would also soak up the liquid differently.  With too much liquid, the high% whole grains in conjunction with the Backferment, I'm guessing that things were really fermenting and proofing very quickly and got out of hand. You right, when ever it is too wet it either belongs in a pan or you call  it ciabatta:-)

No worries.  Now you know how to tell when dough is too wet and time to add flour, get out a pan or change the name.  It's all just part of learning to be a good bread baker.  The more we fail the more we learn as a result.

Even though this might have turned out ton be a  Rustic Frisbee, I'm sure it tasted great and that is by far the most important thing!

Happy Baking and on to the next failure that will eventually lead to success!