The Fresh Loaf

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Rises in the pan, but falls in the oven

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1thingeveryday's picture
1thingeveryday

Rises in the pan, but falls in the oven

A few months ago, faced with high bills and a houseful of picky eaters, I decided to try and make our bread instead of buying it. I found a recipe online that had a lot of positive comments and gave it a go. The first few loaves were beautiful -- golden-brown, sweet, perfect sandwich bread. But then, something changed. The bread is still golden-brown and sweet, but I can't get it to stay risen in the oven.

I do the following:

 

1 tbsp dry active yeast, proofed with

1 cup blood-warm water and

1/3 c white sugar

 

Then I add the foamy mix to

3 c white flour or 2 c white/1 c wheat flour

1/8 c vegetable oil

1 tbsp salt

 

I mix well, then form into a ball and put it into an oiled bowl that I cover with a clean tea towel. I let it rise in the back room, where the temperature is the most consistent (about 80F). After it rises (usually about an hour) I punch it down, put it into a greased loaf pan, and then it's back to the back room to rise again. Then into the preheated oven at 350 for about 40 minutes.

 

I know that step 1 is to get a scale, and I'm working on it. But other than making sure my measurements are equal every time, is there anything I'm doing here that would make the bread fall in the oven? Thanks!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Bread falling in the oven is usually overproofing.  I'd suggest cutting the yeast back considerably, like in half.

Good luck!

1thingeveryday's picture
1thingeveryday

I'll give that a try, thank you!

Kbone's picture
Kbone

I agree with Floyd that the problem could well be overproofing. In addition to cutting back on the yeast you might want to shorten your proofing time a bit or find a place a little cooler than 80 degrees. Yeast will work pretty fast at that temperature, especially with all that added sugar and white flour.

1thingeveryday's picture
1thingeveryday

I was told that letting bread rise in a warm environment will make it sweeter, while letting it rise in a colder room will make it more sour. Is there any truth to this?

Kbone's picture
Kbone

I never heard that specifically. The only thing I can think of along that line would be that a bread made with sourdough culture would likely be more sour if fermented at a cooler temperature since the extended time that would take for the bread to rise would allow for the lactobacillus to create more lactic acid causing the bread to be more sour tasting. Perhaps someone else can shed more light on the subject.

adri's picture
adri

While this is true to sourdough, with yeast you won't get a sour taste if you just let it ferment for a couple of hours.

edit: sorry Kbone. I didn't see that you already answered the same thing.