The Fresh Loaf

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My First Tartine Loaf

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CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

My First Tartine Loaf

It is very exciting.  I have always wanted to bake a Tartine loaf and now I have done it. There certainly were trials along the way.  I weighed out the ingredients and just felt it was too much water.  The dough hydration seemed high, so I had to add some flour during the turn-and-folds.  It seemed to work out OK in the end.  I also did more turn-and-folds to get the dough to where I thought it would work. I am very anxious to see the crumb. I have to let it cool down, but can't wait to try it for lunch and see what rating my husband gives it.....I used the recipe below.

http://www.crumblycookie.net/2011/05/29/tartine-country-bread/

Comments

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

our blogs crossed for our joint first forays into Tartine breads !  Your loaf looks great so I'm looking forward with interest to see the crumb shot.  How did your loaf look when you turned it out?  Flat and seemingly unlikely to rise like mine?  I was pleasantly surprised at the depth of smell and flavour coming out of what in reality is just a bit of wheat and wholewheat flour and water !  Good job.

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

ElPanadero:  Wow!  Just saw your bread.  Looks great.  When I first turned it out to the heated lid (I used my LaCloche rather than a Dutch oven), it was the tallest loaf I had ever made.  I usually am disappointed with the flatness, but not this time. I am always trying to get a little more height, and I finally got it.  I think the dough was too wet, so I actually added more whole wheat (my starter was all white, and the recipe called for ww, so I should have figured that out...), and I did fold-and-turns every 30 minutes for about 7-8 hours. i put it in the fridge overnight, and it came up nicely.  We just had it for lunch, and it was very good.  It is a very large loaf, and I split it in half and froze the rest!  It is fun to try new things, isn't it?  Phyllis

dosco's picture
dosco

I am looking forward to a pic of the crumb!

-Dave

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

height you've achieved there for sure, and a very professional overall look.   I presume the extra flour reduced the hydration level somewhat and that gave more strength to the dough.  I wonder if the trade off there is the resulting size of the crumb holes?  Not sure.  I think this calls for an experiment.  I'm going to bake another anyway using my white starter rather than the rye starter to compare the depth of flavours, and the recipe I have used only makes a small loaf of about 770g so I think I will make 2 side by side and add a little extra flour to one as you have done here and then compare the height of both and the crumb of both.  Should be interesting.  Congrats again.

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I agree. I think it reduced the hydration, so I will try for more next time, as I really wanted bigger holes!  Let me know how your experiment goes!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Very attractive country boule , CAPhyl!

Good job.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

formulas produce wet dough and it is hard not to add more flour to it.  But, if you don't the the dough will tighten up after the stretch and folds enough so that a fine loaf is produced inside and out.  It is just a matter of getting used to wet dough and learning how to develop the gluten well enough - a higher gluten or higher protein quality flour doesn't hurt any either.

Next time just resist the urge to add the flour and your holes will magically appear!  Looks great inside and out anyway and the holes don't taste like much if you ask me :-)

Happy Baking Phyllis! 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Dabrownman:  Thanks for the advice.  As it was my first time making the Tartine, I couldn't believe how sticky it was, and I used a white rather than ww starter, so I thought the hydration was high.  I will soldier through next time with the wet dough to get the big holes.  I will definitely make it again, using your advice. Thanks for your encouragement, as always.  Phyllis

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

My first breads were sourdough Tartine loafs. I didn't really know what dough should look like. So I had no desire to add flour. Just followed the book more or less and it came out great!

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I'll make it again and avoid the extra flour.  Impressive that you made the Tartine first! Best,  Phyllis

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

By the way, if you mix e flour and water the night before, the dough is much less sticky (although it sticks to the bowl like glue, once you detach it, it does not seem at all sticky on wet hands)