The Fresh Loaf

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Tangzhong or Japanese Milk Bread Variant

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Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

Tangzhong or Japanese Milk Bread Variant

Just for giggles and pure laziness, I didn't knead the Japanese Milk Bread this time - just a few stretches and folds like it was an artisan bread.  The dough was sticky and I just placed it into a loaf pan for sandwich bread.  

The water roux (1 part flour to 5 parts water) was 20% of the total dough and I used all purpose unbleached flour instead of the usual bread flour.

flour              100%

Water             33%

Milk                33%

Inst yeast       1.6%

Sugar              15%

Salt                 1.5%

egg                12.5%

butter                8%

 

 

Comments

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

One of the "wettest" recipes I've seen.

Liquids + fat = 108.5%

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

... for butter was 8%, not 30%.  I've corrected the post.  That drops the "wettness" to 86.5%.  That's still very wet.

FF

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

LOL!

Knew that pretty much had to be a mistake on the butter.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Well done FF.  Just perfect inside and oiut

Happy baking

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

I appreciate that.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

What brand of flour are you using? Kroger? If so, how much is it going for nowadays?

I could see this becoming a favorite.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

Gold Metal unbleached all purpose.  It sells for $2.5 to $3.00 around here for a 5 lb sack.

FF

sue cardiff's picture
sue cardiff

Baking temp and time please, got to try this.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

double message

 

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

The first step is to make a roux with all of the water (33% of total flour) and 1/5 of that weight as flour (7% of total flour).  Heat that to 150 F or until it thickens and lines trail the whisk.  Cool and either cover with plastic wrap or butter to stop a film from forming.

Mix in the remainder of the ingredients and let sit covered for 20 min.  Stretch and fold and return to rising container.  Repeat the process twice more (20 - 30 minutes apart) or until the dough is shiny or silky.  Let this rise 1.5 times to twice the original volume.

Gently flatten and roll for loaf pan baking.  Proof until 1.5 times it's volume or about 1.5" above the lip of an 8.5"x4" loaf pan.  

Glaze with egg wash and bake at 350 F for 40 min or until 190 F to 200 F internally.  Cover with foil if the top gets too dark.  Tip onto a rack to cool.

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

temp is C not F for roux to thicken. 65°C/149°F

just wanted to clarify so someone isn't frustrated.

wayne

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

That's correct.  I've corrected the post.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

What pan size was used here? Dough weight?

Guessing the pan size was 8½ x 4½".

Thanks.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

Yes, I made a 1.7 lb loaf and used a 1.5 lb loaf pan which is 8 something by 4 something.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

 

      
 for 1 med-lg loaf or 9 buns or 14 rolls
 Janpaese Tangzhong Milk BreadIN GRAMS 
            roux        dough        totals            %
 bread flour25350375100.0%
 water125 12533.3%
 inst yeast 661.6%
 sugar 555514.7%
 salt 551.3%
 ---    
 egg 474712.5%
 milk 12512533.3%
 butter 30308.0%
        Total150625775206.7%
BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

I make Tangzhong based breads all the time - whether Japanese or just plain old white bread.  I find the roux (Tangzhong) makes a noticeable improvement to the texture.

You said you folded the dough instead of kneading it.  What was the noticeable difference to the final product/texture if any?

 

Thanks and great looking loaf!

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

….I don't know.  I gave the loaf to a neighbor.  However, I'm baking another loaf now.  I'll let you know.

FF

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

...and this time the dough didn't seem as wet.  The crumb wasn't nearly as open, but the texture and flavor were very good.  Looks like I'll be making this more often until I get consistent results.

FF

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

I was interested in this because I only have AP flour on hand(GMAP, bleached).

As I also don't have any commercial yeast on hand, I made a sourdough version.

Also, as I knew I would be making rolls(6", sub type x 12) which would require more dough handling, I kneaded in 14g extra flour. Actually, as I was making 44 oz of dough, I ultimately added 28g(1 oz) extra flour. So I ended up with 45 oz of dough.

All in all, quite pleased with the results. I did reduce the sugar to 9% also.

Thanks. I will probably make this again, as this may be the only type flour I can get for a while.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

...modified and that is all over the internet calls for bread flour.  I just used all purpose and expected a wetter dough.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Yes. I understand that. I usually wont even try most bread recipes with AP flour. Glad you did.

I actually tried my first Tangzhong recipe about 4 years ago.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/117146#comment-117146

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

...you did more than "tried".  Nice loaves.

 

FF

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

I use AP flour fairly consistently for this bread.  We like the texture and the lightness of the loaf.  I make this bread so often, that I purchased some high sided tins on a British Baking site, called Bakery Bits.. it was the only place I could find them.  I bought two, shipping and cost were fairly reasonable, actually.  

Consistent results every time.  My picture was submitted to the website and they featured this bread there.  

Tangzhong

BellesAZ's picture
BellesAZ

BTW, it took me a few bakes to resist the temptation to let this rise too long.  It has a nice spring in the oven, so suddenly it becomes too high and the dough tears during the bake.  I use a proofer box to proof my dough, which really helps in the rising.. so I find if I start the bake before it gets too tall, I can actually slice it for toast.  Here is a pic of some rolls I made.  Instead of rolling the three sections of dough, I rolled six and baked them in the same pans.  I also like to double the recipe when I bake these.  We enjoy the bread for toast and soft sandwiches and it does stay nice for a few days.  I have also used this recipe to make cinnamon rolls.. very nice, small batches.

Frequent Flyer's picture
Frequent Flyer

…loaves.

FF