The Fresh Loaf

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Mixed olives (slightly spicy) left over. How to use in bread?

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Theresse's picture
Theresse

Mixed olives (slightly spicy) left over. How to use in bread?

I just discovered a container (only about a cup or so) of mixed olives that were left out without a lid on the kitchen island since Xmas night.  Some are greek, some are green.  No biggie since they're in some sort of oil (has chili peppers in it), correct?

I'm new to bread-baking but have made a few whole wheat loaves now (one in the boule shape using a banneton so I feel like I *sort* of have made an artisan bread already - ha) as well as other bread-products using my new Ankarsrum stand mixer. :)

So can I use this in bread?  If so, do you have a recipe you can recommend?  I'd be using active dry yeast rather than homemade yeast (forget what it's called - starter?).  I might need as many details as you're willing to share, within reason, for smooth sailing.

Thank you!

p.s. Oh one more thing!  My very old grandma, bless her heart, is upset that her local store no longer sells raisin bread.  So I'd also love a good recipe to make/send to her!  But that one would be for a loaf - she likes it sliced and toasted.  Her favorite I think was Orowheat but I'm not sure.  Thank you again!!

golgi70's picture
golgi70

340 g  King Arthur All Purpose Flour (80%)

80 g   Whole Wheat Flour (20%)

273 g H20  (65%)

6 g   salt     (1.5%)

2 g  Yeast, instant (.7%) (3/4 of a tsp roughly)

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140 grams sliced olives, halved and dried out on paper towels (this is roughly 1 cup)

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1) Autolyse:   Mix Flours with Water until shaggy dough is formed.  Rest 20-60 minutes  

2)  Add yeast and mix to combine (1 minute)

3)  Add salt and combine (1 minute)

4)  Turn up to medium and develop to medium (should have some pull but not pass window test) 3-5 minutes

5)  Add olives and mix on low until well combined.

6)  Bulk Ferment :  1:30 minutes (stretch and fold at 45 minutes and then 90 minutes)  

7)  Cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours

8)  Preheat Oven/Stone to 500 1 hour before removing dough from fridge.

Remove dough from fridge turn on lightly flour surface and preshape into a ball.  Cover and rest 30 minutes

9)  shape as a batard or boule into a proofing bowl or floured cloth and proof 1- 2 hours (1 watch the dough)

10)  bake with steam for 12 minutes and then turn oven down to 450 and continue baking 20-30 mintues longer.

Cool on rack

 

Josh

 

Theresse's picture
Theresse

Josh, thank you so much for this!  I love all the details which are so necessary for someone like me at this point in the game!  My husband ate all the olives... yeah.  BUT, a friend told me he'd kill for some olive and rosemary bread so I might just have to make some for him, getting some more olives!  Thanks again.

Antilope's picture
Antilope

I use some of the olive brine in my olive bread. Make sure to cut down on other added salt if you use the olive brine.

Theresse's picture
Theresse

Oooh that sounds good!  Thanks for the tip!

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Theresse

You can just go with the dough you are happy and familiar with and add the olives, they are only an addition so just add to a dough you have made previously,

if they haven't been pitted (destoned) then do that, the stuffed ones are fine,already removed, you may wish to cut others in half or leave them whole. The amount you add is up to you. it is probably best to fold them in at the end of the mix as they are likely to smash up especially in a tight dough.it is also probably a good idea to dry them off on paper towel prior to adding too. good luck and good eating.

king regards Derek   

Theresse's picture
Theresse

More great tips - thank you Derek!  Dang I love this SO helpful forum...

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

Perfect for ciabatta, with or without added caramelized onions and/or cheese.  Pit and slice them first.

Theresse's picture
Theresse

What type of cheese would you add?  I've never made ciabatta yet - actually all I've made so far is whole wheat bread with or without lots of added seeds, and pizza dough, dinner rolls, kolache and cinnamon rolls.  I'm about to get together whatever I need to in order to make my first true non-sandwich bread (artisan?) and do it by growing my own yeast I guess.  Sounds like fun - I could use another pet (though truth be told I'm afraid I'll forget to feed it and will kill it, ahem.  My cat's gets fed by the rest of my family but they probably won't feed some yeast - even if I give it a name)!! ;)  My 7 year-old says he'd like to name the yeast either "Harry Butt" or "Breado."  Hmmmm....  He just now said he'd like to name it "Josh."  That's interesting. 

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

Try smoked gouda or any other strongly flavored cheese you like! Smoked gouda, black olives, and caramelized onions with a splash of balsamic work nicely with a rustic, crusty bread.

Theresse's picture
Theresse

Yummmm... thanks!