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Tangzhong Onion Cheese Potato Sourdough Rolls

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isand66's picture
isand66

Tangzhong Onion Cheese Potato Sourdough Rolls

For Thanksgiving we were visiting my wife's family in North Carolina as we always do and as usual we brought have our kitchen with us so we could bake for the main feast.

This year I made a double batch of my German Sourdough Pumpernickel Pretzel Rolls and another version of my Tangzhong Onion rolls.  I changed up some of the flour and also added some shredded cheese in the mix for added flavor.

Tangzhong is the technique of heating a portion of the flour and liquid in your recipe to approximately 65C to make a paste (roux).  At this temperature the flour undergoes a change and gelatinizes.  By adding this roux to your final dough it will help create a soft, fluffy, moist open crumb.  It is also supposed to help prevent the bread from going stale.

It is not very difficult to do a Tangzhong.  Use a  5 to 1 liquid to solid ratio (so 250g liquid to 50g flour) and mix it together in a pan.  Heat the pan while stirring constantly.  Initially it will remain a liquid, but as you approach 65C it will undergo a change and thicken to an almost pudding like consistency.  Take it off the heat and let it cool before using it in your recipe.  Some people will refrigerate it for a while but you can use it right away as soon as it cools.

The rolls were a big hit along with the pretzel rolls.  If you try these you won't be disappointed.

Please note I had to use my I-Phone to take the photos so they are not exactly up to my usual standards but hopefully you can stand to look at them :).

Formula

Note: Tangzhong consisted of 30 grams European Style Flour, 20 grams Durum Flour and 250 grams Cream.  I included this in the overall formula below.

Tangzhong-Onion-Cheese-Pota

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Cut up the onion into rings and sauté on low heat until nice and canalized using some olive oil or butter in your pan. Let the onions cool completely and chop into smaller pieces before using in the dough.

Prepare the Tangzhong per directions above and allow to cool to room temperature.

Mix the flours, Tangzhong and cream together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, potatoes and starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), and  mix on low for a minute.   Mix for a total of 13 minutes in your mixer starting on low-speed and working your way up to speed #3 for the last 5 minutes.  When you have about one minute left to mix add the cheese to get it evenly incorporated.  I used a mixed cheese blend that was shredded.  (Note: I didn't follow my own directions and only mixed for about 6 minutes on speed #1.  If you want the rolls to be lighter it is better to mix for the total amount of time as originally indicated).  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and cut into equal size pieces and shape into rolls.  Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and cover with moist tea towels or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, using a simple egg wash brush each roll and sprinkle on your topping of choice.   Next add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 425 degrees.  Bake for 35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown.

Take the rolls out of the oven when done and let them cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

CrumbShot

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

great as usual.  Cheese and onions were made for rolls and the combination of flours had to make these taste special too.  What;s not to like.

Lucy wants to know why she never gets to go anywhere on a road trip like Max?  She only gets to go to the vet and to the beauty parlor - places she isn't that fond of to begin with.....

Happy baking Ian   

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA.  These did taste good and I was happy with how they came out. I was originally going to make something else but I think I made the right decision with these.  

Max was a perfect traveling companion and didn't make a peep the whole ride down.  He had a blast playing with our niece and nephew's dog Bud.  At one point they were having a tug of war with Max's coat.

Max says to tell Lucy if he lived closer he would so come and visit and play :)

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Really nice, Ian.  May I featured these for a bit?

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Floyd.

I would be honored of course if you featured them.

Regards,
Ian

varda's picture
varda

Guessing it's got a ton of flavor.  -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Varda....yes these really were flavorful and went great with the Turkey!

Regards,
Ian

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

Great looking rolls and write up... Glad they will be featured so many can get that recipe... you are awesome!

Happy Holiday Baking,

Diane

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you so much Diane.  I'm glad you like the post and I hope you give them a try some time.

Look forward to your next post as I'm sure your holiday baking must be in full motion.

I baked a few breads today, but not holiday themed but tasty.

Regards,
Ian

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

and they must taste great too. Trying that method has been on my "one of these days" list of things for a while now but haven't had the nerve yet. These rolls might be just the thing to push me to the edge of something new.

Finally followed the formula all the way through today for Forkish's Pain Campagne. I think it was the third try, each time I would delete or get a step out of order. Those breads were okay but I was sure they were missing something. Today, what a difference...just a nice homey rustic country bread. Soft inside with a thin, tender but chewy crust.

We three are baking Gubana next week. Haven't made one in a while, that was the first bread that I baked from Carol Field's "Italian Baker" more than several years ago. That touch of chocolate with small amounts of rum, brandy, amaretto and cherry liquers gives it a bittersweet taste that I've not encountered elsewhere. Couldn't find cherry so will use blackberry.

Your Thanksgiving trip sounds like such a good time. Glad that Max had a good time too.

Take care and stay warm

Barbra

isand66's picture
isand66

I have not tried any of Ken Forkish's recipes yet even though I bought the book several months ago.  I just have not had the inclination to read through it as of yet.  I admire your perseverance and I'm sure it was worth it.

Look forward to reading about you and your adventurous sisters bake of Gubana.  I don't have the "Italian baker" but I've read many recipes baked here and elsewhere from it so I'm sure I'm in for a treat.

Regards,
Ian

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I am getting ready to make your other cheesy rolls with my homemade kefir cheese. They are always a hit. With the YW you can skip the tang and get the lengthy fresh crumb . Love your rolls ! c

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you so much.  I'm very happy you enjoy them.  I think the addition of the Kefir Cheese must make them even better.  One of these days I'm going to take the plunge and make my own cheese.  The only thing I like as much as cheese is bread...and maybe chocolate ;).

Regards,
Ian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Ian,

THese look and sound great.  How can you go wrong with onions and cheese???  I imagine the potatoes along with your roux made these shreddibly soft indeed!

A question about Durum wheat.   I know about it's properties but do not know how the flavor differs from a hard white whole wheat flour and am wondering if you can enlighten me since you work with a number of different four types in your breads.

THanks,

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Janet for your kind words.

The Durum wheat is much different than hard white whole wheat.  It has become one of my favorite flours and I'm sure you have noticed I use it quite often.  It does not have a high protein content so I usually mix it in with stronger flours but I did make a 100% version a couple of weeks ago that came out pretty good.  I find it imparts a subtle nutty flavor but not overpowering with a slight sweetness.  I know you unfortunately can't eat your own bread which must be torturous some times I'm sure, but if you want to experiment, try adding maybe 25-30% to a recipe and work your way up to a higher percentage.  I find when used in higher percentages the dough is extremely silky and a joy to work with.

I'm not sure if you can find the raw grains to mill yourself, but if you want to purchase it, I use the King Arthur Flour brand.  You have to make sure to get the Durum flour and not the Semolina which is courser and better suited for pasta.

Hope this helps and doesn't confuse you more.

Regards,
Ian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Ian,

Thanks for the reply.  I did purchase durum berries from Breadtopia and have used it in a Pan de Mie at 25% and it did create a wonderful loaf but I couldn't see much difference from when I use 100% www in terms of 'performance' and my tasters, husband and son, are of no help when it comes to describing flavor nuances…..they just eat it if they like it and can't tell the difference unless it is I add a lot of rye to a loaf or spices…..My daughter is my nuance reporter but she is at school and won't be back for several weeks….

When you say 'nutty' flavor how is it different from spelt - which I know people describe as being nutty too?  I know spelt adds a lovely texture as well to doughs….soooo many choices.

I guess what I am after is wanting to know if the flavor is pronounced enough for me to order a larger bag from my local grain supplier.  I love experimenting but sometimes the differences just aren't enough to justify yet another storage container on my basement shelf…..

Thanks for your considerations!
Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

Oops my comment did not get saved.

If you use a larger % of Durum it will be noticeable and much different than Spelt.  It is much sweeter than spelt and worth using in my opinions.

Regards

Ian

Foodzeit's picture
Foodzeit

read about using roux to up the moisture content in your baked goods, I never did it yet. Reading your blog entry, it shouldn't be all that easy. Just need to wrap my head around it how to calculate it in my normal dough yield calculations...

Love the pics of your onions rolls as I am a big fan of every baked good containing onions in any case (even if only taken with the Iphone)...

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you for your kind words.

It is really not very hard to calculate the amounts to use.  If you need some help just send me a message with your questions and formula and I will be glad to assist you.

Regards,
Ian

Foodzeit's picture
Foodzeit

a lot for your words. I will first reread a bit about the roux topic and then get back to you. I just need to find out first how the dough yield calculations will change and how the maximum moisture content will change when using roux in breads...

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Great looking bake Ian.

Thanks for sharing your formula.

I am just wondering, is roux the correct terminology? Sorry if my OCD is showing, not trying to be a jerk, just wondering aloud. 

Congratulations on the featuring! 

Keep up the good work.

Cheers,

Wingnut

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Wing for your comments.

Not sure about the terminology but I just picked that up from others.

Regards

Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

The rolls look delicious, and wow! That is quite a lot of cream!

As usual, fine baking Ian.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Khalid for your kind words.

True it is a lot of cream but for Thanksgiving it's okay to indulge :)

Regards

Ian

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

when I get a breather after the holidays.  

You did good, Ian  :)

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you!  I hope you like them.

Happy Holidays.

Ian