The Fresh Loaf

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Bread is heavy after completely cooling

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rockfordbaker's picture
rockfordbaker

Bread is heavy after completely cooling

Trying to make hamburger/hotdog buns for my bakery. The recipe tastes fantastic. Rises well and browns great. The problem I am having is after the buns completely cool and I bag them, the next day they are very heavy and a little dry. They are so light and airy after they first cool, but after sitting overnight they get heavy. I am using a hobart mixer to knead the dough for about 10 minutes. I proof in a Nu-Vu convection oven with a proofer, til doubled. Temp: 80-85 and humidity about 75-80%. Shape then back in proofer until about 90% doubled then baked in the convection oven at 350 for about 10-12 minutes. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Also I am shaping the HB buns into 4oz balls and HD into 2.5 oz. I form the hamburger into balls and roll on the table while my hand is cupped over it. The hotdog I am not very good at but basically take and stretch until it is about 5.5" long and about 2.75" inches wide. 

Recipe:

1956 g KA Sir Galahad Artisan Flour

1215 g Water

14.4 g Instant Yeast

384 g Butter

45 g Salt

120 g Nonfat Dry Milk

135 g Corn Syrup

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

"heavy"? Surely they can't gain mass just because they sit in a bag, especially if they are completely cool.

rockfordbaker's picture
rockfordbaker

"Heavy" is the only way I know to describe it. It gets very dense and when cutting into the bun you can tell it is not "light and airy" it is like a fallen cake almost. The weight does not change but it is much more dense and dry.

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

It's not uncommon for rolls and small loaves to brown quicker than they bake completely. Also, 350 F may be a bit too low temperature, go for at least 400 or so. If the rolls burn too much, try lowering the temp back to 350-375 and baking a bit longer. Also, if your setup allows, consider using a preferment, it might be the case that your rolls are staling quick due to little fermentation.

rockfordbaker's picture
rockfordbaker

I examined by buns more closely this morning and this is what I found. The tops of the hamburger buns are soft and airy. The bottoms, however, are dense and when I cut the bun in half the bottom weighs twice as much as the top. Could the way I am shaping them make a difference, the palming method? I am making more dough now and I am going to try upping the temp of the oven and see if that makes any difference. Thanks for your input MisterTT

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

leaves me at no doubt that you are underbaking. Too low a temperature for too short a time. Here are some recommendations for hamburger bun baking temperature and duration:

482 F (250 C) for 12 minutes (80 g, 2.8 oz buns) -- by Jan Hedh

400 F (205 C) for 15 minutes (85 g, 3 oz buns) -- by Peter Reinhart

There are, of course, more opinions, but I would agree with Reinhart's recommendations, Hedh just seems too hot for burger buns. Also, you should use a food thermometer to check if the buns are done: the center should register about 90 C.

Shaping might be an issue, but there's less of a chance that it is. If there are no huge holes between the top and bottom of the buns, then you're not overproofing and will be fine when you adjust the temperature.

 

rockfordbaker's picture
rockfordbaker

Thank you so much MisterTT, I came in this morning, checked the rolls and they are PERFECT. Followed your advice and upped the temp of the oven to 400 and they are great. Thanks again

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

glad they turned out well :) Baked a batch of hamburger-like buns myself this morning, though with just a little enrichment. Happy baking!