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Almost Twin White Breads - One YW / SD and One SD

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Almost Twin White Breads - One YW / SD and One SD

It has been a long time since we have done any YW baking and it was time to refresh the YW after 4 weeks hiding in the fridge.  We decided at the last minute to do a test comparison bake. One with a YW/SD levain and one with just a SD levain.

 

The YW / SD version had 4% more whole grains.  We wanted to weigh it down a little more than the SD version and we added a multi-grain scald to both since we love whole berry scalds in breads almost as much as w love sprouts.  The YW version was 22% while grain and the SD version was 18%.

 

Both are a little light on the whole grain side but we also need some croutons for Thanksgiving stuffing too and these loaves should fit the bill well.  The levains were built over 3 stages and then refrigerated for 24 hours after they had risen 255 after the 3rd stage feeding.

 

Since these were white breads we did a 1 hour autolyse this time.  We did up the hydration a couple of points on the YW version to account for more while grains.  We did follow our usual method of 3 sets of slap and folds (7, 3 and 1minute) and 2 sets of stretch and folds all 15 minutes apart. As soon as the folding was comp, ete the dough was pre-shaped and then shaped into a boule and an oval for the SD/YW version.

 

Some of this year's lettuce crop in pots

We put the dough seam side down in the baskets hoping to get a natural cracking at the seams when the dough hit the heat and steam the next day ala Ski’s Forkish and David Snyder’s Pugliesi.  The dough was then retarded in the fridge for 16 hours - 4 hours more than we would have liked but that is life.

 

The dough nearly proofed 100% in the fridge because of the extra 4 hours.  No worries since we had planned to bake it cold right out of the fridge and not to slash it so the stiff cold dough wouldn’t collapse due to any over-proofing.

 

The dough was un-molded and placed into Big Old Betsy 20 minutes after the oven hit 525 F and the oven had further climbed to 550 F.  It was sandwiched between 2 stones and the mega steam was supplied with two Pyrex pans filled with lava rocks and half full of water that were placed in the oven when it hit 525 F

 

The bread steamed for 5 minutes at 550 F, 5 minutes at 500 F and 5 minutes at 475 F. After 15 minutes the steam was removed from the oven as it was turned down to 425 F, convection this time.  We rotated the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes until the bread registered 205 F on the inside - exactly 15 minutes after the steam came out and 30 minutes total baking time.

 

The bread browned beautifully with huge blisters on the outside of both but more so on the YW / SD oval.  The bread did spring but it was contained within the crust which didn’t crack because it was 100% proofed.  So these are totally unblemished crusts but still very attractive!  The YW/SD appears to have puffed itself up a little more than the SD  boule.

 

The crumb of the YW / SD was open, soft and moist with a SD tang that was somewhat muted but not missing either.  It is a delicious bread.  We didn't cut into the SD version and froze it whole for Thanksgiving.  This bread made for a nice cotto salami and aged cheddar cheese sandwich for today's lunch. This bread reminds me of Tartine only it has more chew due to the scald.

 

YW / SD Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

2.59%

Yeast Water

30

0

0

30

5.18%

Whole Rye

5

10

9

24

4.14%

Whole Wheat

5

10

9

24

4.14%

Whole Spelt

5

10

9

24

4.14%

Water

0

15

17

32

5.52%

Total

60

45

44

149

20.53%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

80

13.72%

 

 

 

Water

70

11.99%

 

 

 

Hydration

87.42%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

14.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

White Whole Wheat

100

0.17256

 

 

 

AP

400

69.03%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

86.28%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.90%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

375

64.71%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

75.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

580

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

445

76.70%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.70%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

22.35%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Total Scald

75

12.94%

 

 

 

 

SD Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

2.58%

Whole Rye

9

6

10

25

4.29%

Whole Wheat

9

6

10

25

4.29%

Whole Spelt

9

6

10

25

4.29%

Water

30

18

10

58

9.96%

Total

72

36

40

148

25.41%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

83

14.16%

 

 

 

Water

66

11.24%

 

 

 

Hydration

79.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.54%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

450

77.25%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

85.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.72%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

360

61.80%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

72.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

583

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

426

73.05%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

73.05%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

18.45%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,093

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

25

4.31%

 

 

 

Total Scald

75

12.94%

 

 

 

 

Lucy got her shots today so she wanted her ears rubbed!

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Love those big brown eggs you made..oh wait those are breads?  Seriously, they both look great and I love the nice dark and shiny crust you achieved and open crumb.  Interesting that they did not open at the seems like you had hoped for but they sure must taste good anyway.

Have a great weekend.

 

Regards,

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Maybe living on chicken ranch for 2 years effected my bread making :-)  Have to remember to keep the retards down to 12 hours too.  Glad you like the bread Ian and have a good weekend.

Happy baking.

teketeke's picture
teketeke

They look very yummy, dabrownman!  Very nice crust that I admire!!

In my opinion and from my experiments, YW 's life span is 6 months, so is my sourdough starter. Although, For sourdough starter, if I dried it out and make it into powder, it may keep it longer.

Anyway, go back to my YW story,   the YW may be strong enough to make bread even you leave it in a refrigerator for 4 weeks.  I baked a Japanese sandwich loaf with the RYW that I left it in the refrigerator for 3 weeks ( I shook it once or twice during the time ) because I was too sick to bake for a while.   I don't know if it works for everybody, but mine is fine.

Now, I am making baguettes for THANKSGIVING STUFFING! :)  Yours will be really lovely stuffing indeed!!

Happy baking,

Akiko

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

until the site gets fixed. Glad to see you are feeling better and baking again.

I'm pretty sure, after dong it a couple of times, that my YW and SD can do at least a month untended in the fridge and still be OK.  They are pretty tough to kill and I have tried often to do so.  I need to remember to refresh my SD starter today!

This bread turned out too good so..... maybe only one will make it into the the Thanksgiving stuffing.  Your baguettes are too good for stuffing too!

Happy baking Akiko

Darwin's picture
Darwin

Mr Brown those loaves look perfect to me.  I love the colour, blisters and crumb, well done. That looks like arugula in the first pot, but I can't see well enough. I never thought to grow some here, maybe I should give it a go.  Tosoi is one of my most favorites of lettuce.

The wee beast of a dog is rather cute and I would bet has lots of personality.    ;)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and a determined German too!  You are correct - arugula is in the first pot - one of my favorites but the girls don't like it much.  I like the red leaf Romaine. We don't let them get full grown and just pick the biggest leaves off every plant each day for the dinner salad.  We have a dozen (12" to 14") pots with different greens in each one and that seems to be about the right amount,  Never heard of Tosoi but will look for it.  Forgot to plant kale this time and the girls love kale and won't let me forget again.Maybe I will plant some for them.  Pots let you bring the plant indoors the few times it freezes - fills the kitchen up!

Glad you like the bread and

Happy baking

Darwin's picture
Darwin
isand66's picture
isand66

Give Lucy a big hug and some good ear scratching from me!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to the beach with a stick to chase after., 

isand66's picture
isand66

Funny you should say that.....it's a balmy 55 degrees today and Max did enjoy his walk on the beach :).  He was having fun digging for sand crabs or who knows what!

annie the chef's picture
annie the chef

Beautiful crumb, too. These loaves are the treats.

Happy baking,

Annie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The blister happen because .....I wish i knew. I used to think it was because of baking retarded loaves cold but some don't blister.  Then i thought is was mega steam but some don't blister then either.  then I thought is was because of baking loaves that are cold with mega steam but even that proved an elusive truth.  Now I just blame Lucy for it like everything else:-)  You would think that someone on TFL would know for sure?

Glad you liked the bread..... it is very tasty.

Happy Baking

annie the chef's picture
annie the chef

 I quote:

There are numerous ways to achieve blistering, but they all can be best summarised by saying:  use lots of water when mixing, and use as little flour when handling.  High enzymatic (especially proteolytic) and acid activity in the dough both help as well, as does using as whole a grain as possible.  A well-developed and/or well-fermented dough (is there a difference?) really increases your chances.  Most bakers will mistakenly tell you the blisters result from retardation, but this is simply not true.  What they are confusing is that blistering is more common in retarded loaves than in straight, room-temperature doughs because the water activity increases viscosity as the temperature lowers; that is, water becomes thicker and denser as temperatures decrease.  If a dough behaves as though it has less water, then less flour is required to handle it.  Hence, perfect conditions for blistering.  

The doughs I use are extraordinarily wet by commercial standards.  I have had stagiaires from Kayser in Paris struggle and not ever get the hang of these kinds of dough.  Understand, though, that blistering is overrated.  It means nothing about the way a dough was fermented, and that's ultimately what good bread's about.

Liink : http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/31624/breaking-bread-exploration-bread-and-its-many-facets

 

Do you agree with him?

Annie

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Those are very attractive round loaves, DA! the blisters, crust color, and crumb are all superb.

Thumbs up to you.

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I;m  thinking when they went into the oven and I am glad they puffed themselves up, but not too much, rather than deflating.  This happened one othertime with David's Pugliesi Caprriocco (SP?) only it has less whole grain and the hles were bigger.  These are pretty good tasting breads (I'm guessing on the SD one since I froze it whole) with just enough hole grains to give them decent flavor.

Glad you liked then Khalid and happy baking.

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Nice blistering on these dawhiteman!  I mean....

The crust looks great and with no scoring, it's surprising no blow out.

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

It it was odd they both sprang with no blooming blow out anywhere.  Very odd.but they had to be right at 100% proof to do that.  Did you use that turkey roaster for a turkey on Canadian Thanksgiving instead of bread ?

Glad you liked them John and Happy baking

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

No, my mother cooked turkey this year but she did use the exact same one.  Unfortunately I was too busy to bake a bread to take over.  Sadly, as much as I love the turkey roaster, I have somewhat moved on from it.  I found that I can create enough steam in the oven without.  I just lay out my tiles and pour boiling water in a metal pan.  I love the roaster but it is a bit constraining for size.  I like to bake larger loaves sometimes and also nicer to be able to bake 2 at a time. 

I still have yet to see a significant difference between the two methods.  I am sure the roaster insulates better.  A work in progress anyway.

John