The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

00 Flour and bread

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Crustie's picture
Crustie

00 Flour and bread

Does anyone have any tips for using 00 flour for bread?

Haven't tried it yet, but use it for pizza and just wondered how it would work for for bread.  Or mixed in with other flours for bread.

Would appreciate any information.

 

Thanks

Crustie

 

isand66's picture
isand66

I have used it many times in my bread baking.  I would not use it as the main ingredient since the protein level is too low but I use maybe 20-25% of the flour mixed with a stronger flour.  I'm baking English Muffins right now and I used it mixed with spelt and bread flour.

Regards,
Ian

foodslut's picture
foodslut

.... if I've run out, but no more than 10-15% of the total flour weight because, as Ian says, of the lower protein level.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Crustie,

Actually "Tipo 00" is a measure of the ash content in the flour, and gives no indication of the protein content at all.

It is basically telling you how white the flour is, and is a common way to grade flour in Europe.   Germany, France and Italy all have their own grades, but the UK uses the % extraction as found in the US I believe.

Given Mediterranean wheat is not so strong as North American bread wheat, it is not unreasonable to expect a "Tipo 00" flour to be weaker than regular US bread flour.   However, there is no guarantee of that offered by the grading of the flour according to ash content.   You need to have some analysis of the protein content and quality in order to make any sort of informed assessment of strength.

Best wishes

Andy 

isand66's picture
isand66

Andy, I know you are 100% correct regarding the 00 being an indication of the ash content, I do however know that the KAF and Caputo flour I use has a much lower protein content than any US bread flour I have used.

ananda's picture
ananda

I know that Ian, but that just happens to be the case; it has nothing to do with the "00" grading.   It is perfectly possible to find very high protein "00" flours.   Think Panettone here perhaps?   That is made in Italy using high and excellent quality protein wheat, which will most likely have a "00" grade.

I know your assessment might be generally correct; but it is important to understand what the "00" grade is, and that it does not correlate with protein content in anyway.

Best wishes

Andy

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

with sourdoughs because of the longer life of the dough.  More ash means longer dough life before it starts to be attacked by the acids formed from fermentation.  Lots of play time for long fermentations.

High ash 00 flour, soak or poolish it with great results.  

High ash works well with rye flour too.  

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Caputo makes many '00' flours each well suited for different types of baking.  I prefer the Chef's for my pizza's.  

Caputo's Rinforzato 00 flour has a Protein content of 12.5% and Ash 0.53%.  It works very nicely for breads requiring a stronger flour.

As Andy has stated it's strong enough for a Panettone...note the ash content.

I have used Caputo's Rinforzato (reinforced) '00' flour for a focaccia I baked HERE  and also I have used it in my Italian bread (sourdough semolina country loaf) HERE...just scroll down for a crumb shot in the comments.  There is also a link to the formula in which I subed the bread flour for the CR included in this post.

The CR00 flour was not used in the 100% Sprouted WW boule in this photo.  Only my italian Sourdough Semolina Country loaves.

I plan on using Caputo 00 Rinforzato 'reinforced' flour in my panettone this Christmas.

added:  I hope I have corrected the link above

Sylvia  

 

Crustie's picture
Crustie

Thanks for all the replies!

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Italian 00 flour (I use Caputo) is the only way to make regular German Weizenbrötchen with their fluffy, loose, pull-out crumb in the US (unless you have a source for German Typ 405).

Weizenbrötchen

I also use it with other flours in some of my mini breads from South Tyrol, like Kürbiskernbrot (pumpkin seed mini bread). Without this soft wheat flour, even in mixes with other flours, you cannot achieve the right consistency, I tried several other ways to emulate it, but unsuccessfully. Pastry flour can be used as substitute, but only in mixes, and it's still not the same.

Pumpkin Seed Mini Breads from the Alps

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for sharing these great recipes for rolls.  I will have to give both of these a try soon.

Ian

hanseata's picture
hanseata

They taste very good, and one cannot eat Cecilienhof bread all the time :)

Karin

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Karin,

Just to point out that the flour type you reference may be milled in Italy, but that in no way implies the wheat used was grown in Italy.   Australia is one of the most common sources for instance.

All good wishes

Andy

hanseata's picture
hanseata

as usual, a well of wisdom regarding all things flours and baking!

I put your information about the unreliable protein content of store bought British plain flour in my blog post on "Flour Translation", too.

I'm sure you are right about this, but whether grown in Australia or Italy, this flour is, indeed, the only one in the US that I found works for these kind of European rolls.

All good wishes to you, too!

Karin

Crustie's picture
Crustie

Thanks to everyone that has responded.  The reason I was thinking of using the Caputo )) flour was to see if I could keep the nice loose crumb, but reeduce the thickness of the crust.  The crusts have been coming cripsy, out too thick.

So I guess I am going about the solution to the problem incorrectly.

 

Art