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15 % Whole Grain SD and YW Orange, Cranberry Walnut Bread

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

15 % Whole Grain SD and YW Orange, Cranberry Walnut Bread

This Friday’s bake started out as 2 bakes which were originally to be completed while we were smoking some brisket and pork sirloin over 12 hours.  Neither bread was to be  retarded but completed within 12 hours – not including the time it took to build the SD and YW levains.

  

This all in the same day bread is quite unlike our normal efforts to bring out the sour in the SD with retarding but sometimes a SD bread without so much tang is preferred by some others around here besides Lucy and I.

  

SD left YW right but it is hard to see the yellow color amd thd zest in the YW.

The YW citrus, fruit and nut bread was a Lucy adaptation of Floyd’s current home page post of Thanksgiving Baking Ideas  that featured a chemically leavened Orange, Cranberry and Walnut Bread here that featured a chemically leavened Orange, Cranberry and Walnut Bread here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/cranberryorangewalnutbread

 

We really liked the looks and ingredients of Floyd’s bread but, since no sour was needed for this sweet enriched bread we decided to use YW for the leaven.   It has been quite some time since we used any YW from our refrigerated hoard of it and we needed to use some so we could feed the stored remainder to keep it perky.

 

The SD bread was similar to the ingredient list of the one we did last Friday except cut the whole grains in half but still keeping them all in the levain.  The YW fruit and nut bread ingredients we different from Floyd’s in that we cut the orange juice used as liquid by 1/3rd to get a more dough like consistency instead of a thinner batter.

  

We cut the sugar in half to 1/2 C – as a diabetic I don’t put a cup of sugar in anything, plus, the last change to3/4 of dried cranberries from 6 oz of fresh cranberries means that less sugar was needed since dried fruit is more sweet than fresh.

 

We built our levains the same way as always  The YW levain was slow compared to the SD even though both starters had been refrigerated for the same many weeks since they were fed last.

 

So we ended up retarding the SD for a bout 6 hours longer than the YW.  The SD levain fully doubled in the fridge after its lat feeding but the YW showed  little rise after it hit the cold.  So we took the YW levain out of the fridge 4 hours before the SD one and put both on a heating pad to get them to 82 F. 

 

When both had peaked we started the 2 off at the same time by autolysing the dry ingredients with the liquid for 1 hour before mixing and doing 3 sets of slap and folds and 2 sets of stretch and folds when the re-hydrated cranberries and walnuts were incorporated into the YW dough on the first stretch and fold.

 

Once again the YW proofing lagged far behind the SD bread, even though it had tons of sugar and sweet orange juice to fed on.  The SD proofed and was ready to bake in 5 hours on the counter after the last S&F but the YW took 11 hours and it never fully proofed with it still being 1“ below the rim of the tin when I finally gave up on it and baked the bread at 11 PM.  All proofing was done on the heating pad.

 

 We baked the SD in Big Old Betsy - GE regular oven that was preheated to 550 F with mega steam supplied by two pans filled with lava rocks and half full of water that were placed in the oven when it hit 500 F.   The SD was jingly and looked like it might over proof as the oven heated up so we refrigerated the dough in the basket for the 45 minutes it took to heat up the oven

 

15 minutes after Betsy beeped tell Lucy she was at 550 F, we took the SD out of the fridge, un-molded it onto a parchment covered peel, slashed it with a pairing knife and slid it onto the bottom stone that is 12 “ below the top stone. 

 

It sprang and bloomed very well for being so close to what we thought was near 100% proof.  The color was a little on the pale side though so we baked it to 208 F instead of our usual 205 F

 

It’s not bad color but it still didn’t look as boldly baked as we would have liked for that higher than normal internal temperature.  The crust also blistered well and was crisp as it left the oven only to soften as it cooled.

 

The crumb was open, glossy, soft  and moist but no more than last Friday’s bake that had twice as much whole grains in the mix.  What was noticeably different from last weeks bread was the taste

 

Not nearly as much sour tang or complex flavors – exactly what we thought would happen without the extra whole grains and long retards of levain and dough.  It is still a fine tasting bread

 

The big surprise was the YW bread.  After giving up on the proof on the heating pad at 11 hours at it only showing a 50% proof, it sprang like crazy in the oven, easily doubling in volume and splitting widely down on side.  This has happened one time before and I should have known to slash the top!

 

Pork sirloin sandwich in the making with the SD bread.

The bread was baked in the mini oven at 350 F without steam but it was brushed with butter after it came out of the oven to soften the crust and give it even more buttery flavor.  With all the sugars in this dough, it baked up a very pleasing dark brown.

Breakfast with the fruit bread French toast 

For so much spring the bread had a slightly open crumb which surprised me even though were a lot of cranberries and nuts in there to hold the holes back.   That YW can be deceptive in the proof and explosive in the oven - when you least expect it be that way.  YW is still less tame and predictable for me after a year and half baking with it.

 

Slicing the brisket

The taste of this bread is better than I thought it would be.  I don’t miss the missing sugar and orange juice but it could have used more orange zest to make it pop.  We like this brad very much for the Holidays as Floyd thought.  We are also glad we baked it ahead of time to make it will be better later when guests will be here for Thanksgiving.   This bread finished up 5 hours after the long low and slow smoked meat.

Sunrises are just as good as...

I almost forgot that pork sirloin isn’t like butt or shoulder and only needs to smoked to 150 F on the inside because it is so lean and caught this one at 160 F – very tasty, sliced very thin…. something you can’t really do with brisket which is way less lean, smoked to 185 F and cut in thicker slices.  The good thing is that they took the same amount of time it the smoker since the beef brisket is so much thinner than the pork sirloin.

The sunsets!

SD BBQ Bread Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

11

0

0

11

1.88%

Whole Rye

8

10

15

33

5.65%

Whole Wheat

8

10

15

33

5.65%

Whole Spelt

8

10

15

33

5.65%

Water

24

30

15

69

11.80%

Total

59

60

60

179

30.62%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Flour

85

14.46%

 

 

 

Water

75

12.75%

 

 

 

Hydration

88.17%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

17.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

500

85.54%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

85.54%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.71%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

360

61.59%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

72.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

585

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker Water

435

74.34%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

74.34%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

14.46%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,029

 

 

 

 

 

YW, Orange Cranberry and Walnut Thanksgiving Bread Formula

Yeast Water Build

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Yeast Water

75

0

75

15.46%

AP

75

40

115

23.71%

Total

150

40

190

39.18%

 

 

 

 

 

Yeast Water Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

115

23.71%

 

 

Water

75

15.46%

 

 

Starter Hydration

65.22%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

18.72%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

AP

370

76.29%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

370

76.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.65%

 

 

Orange Juice

230

47.42%

 

 

Dough Hydration w/o starter

62.16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Sugar

125

25.77%

 

 

Egg

47

9.69%

 

 

VWG

10

2.06%

 

 

Butter

35

7.22%

 

 

Total

217

44.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

485

 

 

 

Water

305

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration With YW & Adds

71.60%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3/4 C Dried Cranberries Re-hydrated

 

 

 

1/2 C Toasted Walnuts

 

 

 

 

1 T Orange Zest

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm not the least bit hungry but now after reading your post I feel the need to start my smoker and stay up all night and make a brisket and pork butt.

I like the way your cranberry bread turned out.  Looks like a keeper and perfect for the holidays.  The "white" bread looks perfect as you can get.

Nice baking and BBQ!

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I try to stay away from white bread and sweet ones as best i can bui these have to be tasted!    The 20% and 30% versions for the white bread are more sour and tasty but they had the advantage of having he starter, levain and dough all retarded too - still the sour was more than puny mild for this bread.   The rruit and nut bread is good enough to give away as a holiday gift - if we can figure out the proof of the YW better, probably should have been even longer than 11 hours, and remember to slash the dough next time.  When i next feed the SD starter I will feed the YW too and keep it on the counter for a coupe of days before refrigerating it.  Sometimes having enough patience for YW is difficult just as tejketeke said.

The brisket is pretty goods but the bone in pork sirloin really is different than pork butt.  No pulling for pulled pork sandwiches - this you slice very thin in 8th inch slices when cold and then heat up as a sandwich  with: BBQ sauce, cheese and bread in the microwave so you can melt the cheese and steam the bun at the same time.   Pork butt has much much more fat and tastes better as a result but this is still pretty good stuff.

Glad you liked the post Ian and hope you don't stay up all night tending the smoker.

 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

That SD is gorgeous and so is the cranberry nut. You have a lot of patience to wait it out for that many hours. Success in the end. Your pics are always magazine worthy. Would have loved to have a plate as pretty as the one above. Lovely. I will get to a cran/orange/pecan bread before the season is over.

They are calling for light snow here on Tuesday night !! What ??? Shirt sleeve weather every day so far this Fall….you just never know. c

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

As an old photography teacher  that pleases me to no end.  When I first started posting, I was using a 5 year old cell phone that woudn't focus so none of the picture were very good from a lighting point of view, the color was all of and they were 'fuzzy'  Varda commented one time that my posts made her think that her vision was failing or some such! 

I like pretty plates too since they make me even more hungry than usual!  Please no snow in Phoenix - but it is a little sad to have some your way so soon. 

I'm with you.  The orange,cranberry bread would be even better with pecans instead of walnuts but that is just my personal taste too. That bread made so fine French toast for brunch at 10:30 this morning,

The SD is as close as i can get to what current SFSD tastes like to me (mayb4e this one is a little more sour than current) - not the old tang of the late 60's early 70's SFSD that was much,more sour than today.  For that the 20% or 30% whole grain with retards is much closer to the taste of the older SFSD.

Happy baking trailrunner and I hope the snow stays away!

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Nice loaves dab.  This is why I will never put my YW in the fridge.  I just as well pour off every few days and replenish with fresh water and a touch of honey.  Keep it active and at room temp. It's slow enough as it is.  Still looks like you got a sweet and tasty loaf.  The meats look pretty darn good too.

 

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you, the YW doesn't usually act like this if I bake with it once a week, refill with water and a litte honey, let it sit on the courtier for 4 hours before refrigerating it again.  But it has been in the back of the fridge for maybe 3-4 weeks and was much more sluggish than normal.  Still after 11 hours of proof on a heating pad and 50% normal rise it sprang like crazy in the oven to a loaf of normal post bake size - that is saying something!

This SD would remind you of Tartine!

The smoked mast came out pretty good but haven't had a brisket sandwich yet and saving it for guests later today.  I'm still trying to figure out the best way to get you some smoked meats where they aren't spoiled by the time they get to you.  I used to use dry ice when I we would ship frozen products on two runs from out plants but that was on our own trucks.

It seems FedEx and the other carriers won't take packages with dry ice because CO2 is heavier than air and can displace the oxygen in their trucks and the driver might become sleepy or pass put.   I know for a fact that this little amount of dry ice won't do any such thing but I hate3 to ship it that way without telling them. Maybe best to freeze it adn then pack with an artificial blue ice slab on one side and send in an insulated box?  We used to do that for overnight delivery but that can be pretty expensive  or a box of that size and weight.

What do you think? 

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Can we do that? coz I find my yeast water very slow. It would be perfect if I can leave it at room temp.

Does it work with apple and raisin yeast water?? 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and possibly Janet too, keep their YW on the counter keep their YW on the counter and bake with it often enough so that it is ready to go for them every day.. I think that it should work with any kind of YW. Since yeast love the warmth.

CeciC's picture
CeciC

but I only bake once a week, should I leave it on the counter or in the fridge? in the fridge it doesnt look very active to me. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

when I was baking more often than I do now.  What i would do is get it out of the fridge and let it warm up on the counter for a couple of hours.  Then make a levain out of it for the bake using from 80 -100 grams of it ,  I would replace the water with a little honey and then let it sit on the counter for 4-6 hours, shaking it every so often and opening the lid to fan the CO2 out of the jar, before refrigerating it again

After doing this for 3 weeks I would refresh it by changing the apple chunks and or what ever raisins, cherries, etc keeping a half dozen of the old fruit for the for the new mix and 3 T of the old liquid and refill the jar with water, adding some honey and a little sugar shaking it every hour or so and letting the air out of jar while letting it sit on the counter for 6-8 hours to 'ripen'before going back in the fridge. 

It seems to like this schedule pretty well and stayed active enough.

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Dab,

Your sourdough looks perfect!! with your ham it must be perfect!! Your toasted sweet bread is just breath taking.

If you ever need another apprentice, please let me know.

BTW your sunset pic is gorgeous!!

Ceci

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread , post,  sunrise and sunset.  The SD paired well with the pork and the beef - with a little BBQ sauce, pepper jack cheese and microwaves to make everything warm and cozy.

You might want to rethink the apprenticeships around here since they do get treated like dogs most of the time,....well at least some of the time they do:-)

Happy baking CeciC

CeciC's picture
CeciC

I cant imagine they got treated like dogs \../ at least i cant see it in you Dab!! 

You and lucy are more like family who share the passion in baking n both very adventurous. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

around here most always but sadly, her baking master does treat her like a dog now and again - it's part of learning discipline.  Here is her picture this morning while we were tending, actually lust looking at, the garden as the sun was coming up.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Max just licked my computer monitor!  He wants to play with Lucy in the worst way!  She is such a cutie.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

face that say's something like and I wish my German face reading and language was better in these circumstances, ' Hey buddy, you better straighten that Ian baking master buddy of yours out ....and have him post a picture of My Max.... I'm sure Max told him to post one of himself for me too!  Just can't win with apprentices these days......:-)

isand66's picture
isand66

Hi from Max...

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Both of them are such a cuties!!! 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Beautiful breads, the sd and fruited YW. Well done, DA!

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

taste of the SD and it is very close to current SFSD in taste and looks  I have been taking from David's SD experiments for some time now using just a tinge more whole grain.  The no retard made this bread less tangy than our usual.  The girls and guests loved it.  Floy's fruit and nut bread converted well to YW too.

Glad you liked the breads Khalid.  Can't wait to see your deserts and next bake.

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I still don't know how you do it man...even with being retired, how do you find the time to do up all these food spreads???  Incredible.

The white-ish levain isn't a signature dabrownman bread.  It is nice however, to see you do a few here and there.  I am also not much of a fan of whiter breads, but once in a while I do get a craving for the simple.

The meats look amazing.  As much as a love cooking, I have never tackled big hunks of meat like that, let alone more than one at one time!  I think Famous Dave's in Mesa is hiring...:)

John

varda's picture
varda

cranberry bread.   Want some!  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

or as French toast it is very good.  i'm thinking it was the sugar that suppressed the yeast in this bread making ti so slow. Floyd's version, where this came from, had twice as much sugar and 1/3rd more OJ but the chemical leavening he used don't care about the sweet  Forgot about how sweets talked about in lesson #2 on the site, can suppress yeast activity so it is starting to make some sense.

It came out all right in the end that long in coming  and tastes fine which is all that counts.

Glad you like the bread Varda.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

now and again to keep the girls happy and keep them from going into total 'pick on DA' mode.  I mean.... it is 3 against one around here gender wise and a few white breads are a small price to pay for peace in the pasture.  The great thing about bread,coomking and smoking is that they take tiniest little bit of effort and work (almost none) over a long time - a coupe of days so they fit together like butter on toast.

Mix dough for 1 minute and let it sit, do a few S&F's for 3 minutes total over two hours and refrigerate for 12 hours is just like take dry rub and massage it into meat, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 12 hours. take bread out of fridge, let warm up, shape, proof for an hour as the oven heats, put bread in oven and bake with steams high and short for 30 minutes until done is like, take meat out of fridge and let it warn up for an hour as the smoker heats up, put meat in smoker, bake low and slow with smoke and steam for 5-12 hours until meat is done.  The only difference is that the meat takes longer to 'bake'  and allows way more beer drinking to take place over the last 12 hours.  This beer intake, while waiting for the smoke to do its work, is probably why meat smoking is preferred to bread baking by many who do both:-). 

Let's face it - bread making and smoking meat is made for us lazy, retired,  guys who want work as far away from them as possible.  Cooking is even better since that is just a few minutes of chopping stuff at the worst, sauteing some of it for a few minutes, add bread and smoked meats and a large iced glass filled with beer.  Beer making is pretty much the same thing  Turn on fire to cook malted grain to make wort, drain off liquid from spent grain, add hops and what ever else you want to flavor the beer with, let sit to mingle and infuse the wort.  Add yeast and let it ferment for 7-14 days depending on what you are making and how much alcohol you want, drain off, filter, bottle and you are done.  Heck, you don't even have to bottle it if you are having a party and time the beer making right and have enough ice tocool it down... if you aren't Eurppean and prefer you beer cold

Gardening is just as fun and lazy.   Plant seeds or small plants in large pots containing moisture control Miracle-Gro Potting Soil, add water to them every day for 2 minutes if it doesn't rain.  Wait a few weeks for plants to grow large enough to harvest or pick them, chop them and saute them for lunch or dinner..

I don't get retired guys who want to play golf instead of any of this.  Golfers spend a ton of money so you can hit a ball as far as you can - in the wrong direction, curse loudly while possibly breaking  a window in an expensive house and then chase after the ball, which if isn't inside someone's living room is now lost instead.  Either way, you have get another expensive ball out so you can do it all over again only this time you are really pissed off, break your club wrapping it around a tree or lose them all tossing the bag of them in a lake and possibly have a coronary that you won't recover from enough to know you hate golf.  You don't even get to eat or drink anything from your too much and expensive  work - except crow and your buddies giving you the raspberries.  What the heck kind of fun is that!

I have all kinds of time left on my hands to ride motorcycles to biker bars, chit chat with friends that ride, blog about bread and work full time trading while the stock market is open and still have time to train an worthless bread baking apprentice poorly, paint as a hobby (not your kind), design and build stuff that interests me,  make all the meals, do my and only my laundry ( can't be trusted not to ruin other folks clothes on purpose it seems), entertain friends and family,.clean the house and take care of the yard and pool.  Yesterday, i got to dust the ceiling fans - wish we didn't have 6 of them.

i'm always looking for something else to do though.  The hardest thing, that takes the most time, is grocery shopping for all the stuff you need and aren't growing.  Seems like i go to at least one grocery store every day for something on sale or we are out of and need badly like ash covered goat cheese from Mt Etna or possibly Stromboli depending on what color of ash you need to go well or contrast with with the Thai food, :-) 

My only regret was not to start doing this at 50...... instead of 56 :-)   While working, i really loved the things I did but now I get to do the things I love instead - quite a difference and no comparing the lifestyles.  Just blessed and lucky to be able to do it....so you won't find many complaints coming from me or Lucy.  You just have to plan to do it, not at at all hard for an Old Ops Guy and make the most of it while you can ....and hopefully before the police find out :-).  .

So in short, it is a piece of cake...except for that apprentice thing... so its not perfect by far ....except for the sunsets half the year.

Happy baking John 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Well said dabrowny..you're not a golfer either hey?  I used to be a sales rep for a paint manufacturer and I would golf about once a week in the Spring and Summer months...not that I liked it so much, just was part of the job.  Since being involved with the business. I've been golfing once.  That's once in the last 8 years!  Didn't even finish the 18 holes.  I never was a die hard fan of the game anyway.  People do razz me for not playing or hitting the ball once when down in Mesa.  I mean the home is right smack dab in the middle of 2 golf courses.  Just not my passion.  My dad is the same way..when he retired, friends and family bought him golf equipment and wear...he took one lesson at putting and quit.  He's more of a hiking, tennis and swimming guy...likes to stay active.  He says in golf you're mostly waiting around with no exercise.  I told him well what about chess, same thing!...he said no...chess is free to play....touche.

Sounds like you have the retirement thing nailed man :)

John

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Hi Dab,

Do you need a second proof for both bread? apart from that one hour warming up n shaping time?

I am trying to make a dough at night then baking in the morning before I run off to work, instead of sitting there all day looking at my dough

Thanks

CC

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Only one has what i would call a 2nd rise but ,only one works for those who want to bake in the morning before work.  The way that I bake that would work for you is to retard the bread for 8-12 hours, in the fridge in a trash can liner, after shaping and placing in a basket. 

In the summer time I immediately retard the shaped and basketed loaves for 12 hours and they are perfectly proofed for baking the nest morning either right out of the fridge or after warming up on the counter as the oven heats up for the hour it takes for me to get my stones up to 550 F.   To cut this preheat down to 40 minutes, you can bake in a hot DO instead which will get to temperature much faster and you will only be heating it to 450 F or so.

I the winter, because things are so much slower with SD in the cold, I will leave the bread to proof on the counter for a half to 1 1/2 hours, depending on how cold the kitchen is or if i am using a heating pad to keep the basketed dough warm before retarding it for 12 hours.

So if you want to start the oven at 6 AM for a 1 hour warm up and a half hour bake to be done at 7: 30 AM before work, you want to get the shaped and basketed dough in the fridge by 6 PM the night before either right after shaping or after proofing on the counter for up to an hour and a half in the winter,  This means you have to have your starter ready to go at 4 PM (no problem, just feed it before work and let it sit on the counter until 4 PM) and have at least a couple of hours to get the dough through the slap and folds and then through the stretch and folds.before shaping.

The problem comes in if you don't get home from work by 4 PM to get the dough started.   Two ways to compensate for this.say you don't get home till 6 PM is to either include a small commercial yeast poolish with the SD or to adjust the counter proof time and or temperature of the counter proof before the basketed dough is retarded.  Instead of a 12 hour retard you do a 10 hour one and add those 2 hours to the counter proof where things are happening faster.  You might end up wit 3 hour counter proof before retard in the winter that way.

It just takes some experimenting, at each time of year (if you don't have a proofer or heating pad)  to find out what works for you to get the dough out of the fridge in the morning at 85-90% proof and ready for the oven - while you are sleeping.  Whether you let it warm up while the oven heats is up to you and what the dough looks like in the morning. 

You could also get the levain ready for an early morning mix,  get up a couple of hours early and get the dough ready for the fridge retard, let it proof there while at work and then bake it off when you got home.   This early morning schedule would also allow you to do the other way that sort of has a 2nd proof.  Instead of shaping, just bulk ferment the dough in a bowl, in the fridge while at work and then shape and final proof on the counter or heating pad when you get home to bake it later that night.  

Hope this helps

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Thank you so much dab!  

your instruction here is very nice and clear. One thing that I wanna clarify is, after the slap n fold we still need to give it a few turns,   say if it needs a turn every 30 minutes, shall I divide it n shape it right after the last turn or I should wait a bit longer? 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in order to get the most open, soft and moist crumb,  to not mess with the dough after the 2 hour mark after mixing and the autolyse is complete.  i want to get the 3 sets of slap and folds (on 6, 3 and 1 minutes - 15 minutes apart) done as fast as possible and then I want to do 3 sets of easy gentle stretch and folds from the compass points to incorporate the add ins so they are evenly distributed by the end of the 3rd set,  The stretch and folds after the first one (all on 15 minute intervals) is to do shaping as well.  I like killing 2 birds with one stretch and fold :-)

the 2nd one is the pre-shape and the 3rd stretch and fold is the final shape.  In less than 2 hours the working of the dough is done .  Then it is just how long (and at what temperature) you counter proof, based on the time of year,  before retarding to make sure the dough is final proofed at 85-90% in the fridge while you sleep. 

Hope this is helpful .

CeciC's picture
CeciC

this is very helpful! your explanation is very clear. I can't wait to try it out this weekend.

One more question, if I want to divide the dough should I get it done at the first s&f? Thank you very very much! 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

for dividing dough is to do it at the last possible moment.  if the dough is to be divided to make 2 identical loaves of bread, I would divide it right before final shaping.  If I was using the same dough to make 2 different kinds of breads say prunes and walnuts in one and a scald and seeds in the other I would divide the dough before the first S&F when I would be incorporating these different ad ins.  

Happy baking CeciC 

CeciC's picture
CeciC

thank you so much!!! now i have my guide for this weekend keke