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help in identify the problem with my bagels.

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talalzahid's picture
talalzahid

help in identify the problem with my bagels.

Hi there, 

I followed peter reinhart recipe for bagels.  i had 12 bagels 3 which i baked without retardation which turned good. but then when i retarded the rest for the next day for some reason the dough was overproofed ( even with cold temperture in the fridge) and i hardly could pick them up out of the try and drop them in the water and they were super flat. 

I have a feeling that my tray cover is the problem or maybe the dough temp was more than 80 ? 

attached couple of pictures. 

 

thanks in advance 

http://s23.postimg.org/p7lozybl7/IMG_7973.jpg

 

dsadowsk's picture
dsadowsk

Was your refrigerator opened a lot during the day? Were warm items put in near the bagels? Were the bagels left at room temperature for a long time after being taken out of the fridge the next day? All of these might contribute to excess proofing.

talalzahid's picture
talalzahid

Thank you for your reply.

in regard of the point the you brought up the only thing i would say it is possible is opening the fridge a lot. I live in a family house which make it impossible to keep the fridge closed all t

is there is like a recommended temp ?

should i leave it in the top or middle or at the lower shelve ?

is there is a specific time for retardation ? 

what would be the difference if I didnt retarded, I saw the bakery in monteral, they cut the dough shape it and in a little bit they boil them right away. 

 

Thanks in advance 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of the year but a bagel kept in the fridge for 8-18 hours overnight should be pretty hard, not warm at all adn easy to handle in the morning if the fridge is 38 F.

In the summer time in AZ,  I have to put the bagels in the fridge right after shaping with no counter time but in the winter I let them sit on the counter for an hour before refrigerating them.  Mine are annually 20% whole grain so they move along a little faster,

Happy bagel baking

talalzahid's picture
talalzahid

Thanks for your input !

do you think the way i store my bagels to be proofed is good ? 

I use a half pan sheet that comes with plastic cover and it is super tight. After I take my bagels out the fridge I see water condensation on it which i thought is the reason of the failure. 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

When ever i put dough in the fridge for a long retard, the cover what ever it is, usually a tall kitchen trash can liner in my case, is pretty wet the next day on teh inside where the water vapor condenses on the cold surface. i just turn the liner inside out and put it in the AZ sun outside to dry out do I can use it again.  What refrigeration does is draw out some of the water as vapor in the product, if it is not vac packed.  Water vapor will migrate from the warm dough to the cold surface oon teh inside of the cover

If the cover isn't there it would migrate to the cold wall of the fridge and if the wall of the fridge wasn't there it would migrate to the evaporative refrigeration coils of the fridge.  Where surfaces are not freezing, like the fridge walls and your cover, the water vapor will condense back into a liquid on those surfaces - which you noticed. Any room temp food stored in a container with a cover does the same thing.  Bu,t if it gets to the coils of a freezer that are roughly 0 to 10 F in the home, the the water vapor freezes to the coils and why refrigeration coils in freezers have to goi to into defrost to get rid of this ice so that air can flow through the coils again and work properly to keep temperatures at 0 F or lower.

Thsi condensation is normal and wanted- especially for bagels.