The Fresh Loaf

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Farmers Market Week 19 (Spelt SD and Vollkornbrot continued)

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golgi70's picture
golgi70

Farmers Market Week 19 (Spelt SD and Vollkornbrot continued)

As we come upon the last weeks of the market I have now missed a few but next week will be 20. Had all plans set to make an olive bread but the cost of nice olives made me bail on a large batch and simplify.  Maybe had I thought ahead I could get some wholesale prices but I didn't.  So I threw together a formula for a Spelted Sourdough that I'm quite pleased with the results.  The dough is lovely smooth but quite slack and was just super fun to shape.  I also continue on my quest to learn and make 100% ryes which may or may not be going so well.  First batch was simply the worst and its improved since.  I thought I'd make a few pullmans and gift small loaves of this along with the SD.  I should have only made three but I planned on four and accepted that they would be short loaves.  

Last of the tomatoes, beets, cippolini onions, artichokes, daikon radish, goat cheese (pressed ricotta with cumin and fiennel, and queso fresco), new local tuna company, locall olives (which are cut and in my olive bread to bake today), two bags dried figs, cillantro, spinach and brocollli

 

If anyone is interested in the formula I will scale down and post later

Happy Baking

josh

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

than that really!  Post the recipes and the one for the olive bread too - I love olive bread..  That 100% rye looks fabulous and nothing to worry about.if you ask me,  I'm out of it, unless i find some i over looked in the freezer. - need to make some next Friday just to have with the pate!.  Your haul from this week's market is awesome too.

Well done as usual Josh. 

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I'm not really sure on the Rye yet.  Honestly I've had few artisan loaves of true German Ryes and most of my experience eating said bread is store bought.  Hence the reason I don't have much of it.  I find the packaged bavarian breads stale and off tasting.  Others love them.  This I find tasty but I'm not sure how moist the crumb should be.  My first go around was wet and sticky (starch damage) which was obviously wrong.  It did taste good and the gumminess left with toasting.  My second batch was much better.  Now I've read some of "Bread" and he says to not put a lid on these loaves and bake with traditional steam.  He also doesn't do the second build or sponge which is what I accidentally did on round two which worked out the best.  So I think I'll remove the lids and the second build and see how that goes.  Once i get this loaf down I'll move on to another rye.  David (dmsnyder) posts an 80% rye from the same book which looks mighty fine to me.  Maybe its next on the rye list.  Also a true pumpernickel but I'm not sure how to copy the falling oven required.  And yes based on value this week was probably my best score yet.  But I did have almost twice the bread for trade (granted I was sorta gifting the rye).  Anyhoo. 

the Olive loaves came out nice (coulda used more olives) but the local "Hollis" red winter wheat really makes it nice.  I now have some, ground today, Marquis sp??? red winter wheat (a cross of red fife another variety) in a 4 hour levain to become 100% wheat later tonight.  

Josh

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

You really made out with some lovely produce and great exchanges. !!  A lot of good meals in that picture. I would love the formulas. I am still on the lookout for a doable spelt SD and yours looks like it had a wonderful rise and a gorgeous crumb. Also the rye looks perfect for a cheese plate over the holiday. I definitely could use that one too !  Thank you for your generous offer to share formulas. c 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Wow Josh...great job on both loaves but especially the Volkenbrot.  Amazing.  I have yet to master this bread...as one of my favourites to eat, I could only hope that I could get that turn out one day.

Did you get a nice sweetness out of that spelt levain?  I have read people don't like the bitterness spelt can give, but I have never had anything but a natural sweetness could out of that flour.

John

golgi70's picture
golgi70

To me spelt is sweet as well.  I use whole spelt not freshly ground for this one but I find as soon as it hits the water that beautiful color comes alive and the smell is reminiscent of dessert.  Every time the smell catches me off guard and reminds me of something that I still haven't placed.  But it certainly sweet.  Using it in the levain here was quite nice and sped fermentation along but also had a nice little twang to it.  I prefer this loaf to any SFSD loaf I've made or tasted in the past.  But I'm beginning to steer away from whiter breads and don't care much for very sour white breads.  

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

Awesome baking Josh.  I've had mixed results with that style of rye and yours looks real good.

regards

Ian

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I will have to organize my notes on the rye I made but I'd rather share that formula after I'm completely satisfied and have replicated at least once.  So I'll share when that time comes.  As for the Spelt, here you go. 

Formula for Spelt Sourdough 

1000 total flours (700 Malted Bread 70%, 250 Spelt25%, 50 Rye 5%)

 790 total h20 (79%)

 

Spelt Levain @ 75% hydration DDT 77F (4-6 hours) 20% prefermented flour
-------------:
80 g White Starter
160 g Whole Spelt Flour
110 g H20
-------------
350 g
-------------
Dough DDT 78F
--------------
660 11.5 % Bread Flour
 90 Whole Spelt flour
50 Rye Flour
22 Salt
640 H20
---------------
Autolyse 1 hour
Add levain and mix 3 minutes
Add salt and continue on speed 1 to combine
Turn to speed 2 and develop dough (5 minutes)
Bulk Ferment: About 3 hours
Stretch and folds @ 30 minute for 2 hours (each is a leter fold, turn 90 degrees and repeat)
*Dough is still slack but shows good signs of gluten by last two turns
Divide, rest, shape (this dough is loose thanks to the spelt but has lots of strength.  A good tight shape is key)
Retard immediately and bake cold 8-12 hours later or proof 1 1/2 - 2 hours
Bake with steam for 12 minutes vented for 25 more

 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Sounds very doable. It seems that the quick " in the fridge" and then in to the oven the next day are the  key components to success. I shall give it a whirl and post back. c

golgi70's picture
golgi70

This dough is slack feeling.  Smooth and slack but you can feel its strength as you proceed.  Also i baked all but one cold from the fridge the following morning but left 1 at room temp and baked 1 1/2 hours later fearing the ones in the fridge just might not make it.  The room temp loaf spread pretty good on my peel but then nearly quadrupled its flattened height by the end of oven spring.  I still feared that the wet loaves that were active might not hold in the fridge but they did fantastic.  It seems wetter doughs chill down faster in the fridge which helped here.  They stood a bit better on the peel and got even better results than the room temp loaf did.  

Have fun 

Josh

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Slack spelt and I are old friends !  I refused to listen and let them have some bench time before I put them in the fridge and then baked right out of the fridge. I won't make that mistake again LOL !!  Spelt knows what it wants to do and I shall listen. Thank you !   caroline

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely crumb! This spelt SD looks fabulous, Josh.

The volkornbrot is extremenly appetizing. nice job.

-Khalid

 

varda's picture
varda

Josh,   Thanks for posting formula.   I have a big bag of spelt and haven't yet worked out what to do with it yet.   Your spelt baking is terrific.   Also love the volkornbrot.   I bought some from a local (not that local) bakery a few weeks ago, strictly as market research.   Very delicious market research.   Yours looks great. -Varda

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Schwarzbrot (black bread) comes in many variations, and Vollkornbrot, though usually assumed to be a dark rye bread, means nothing but "whole grain bread". My Cecilienhof bread, for example, is a Vollkornbrot, even though it has many more whole grains than just rye.

What is sold in US stores as so called Bavarian Rye is probably something that real Bavarians wouldn't touch. I found it off-tasting, indeed, heavily overdosed with caraway.

Karin

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Well my first two were true Rye Volkenbrots (the first a failure, the second my best attempt yet).  This here my third attempt would not be a Volkenbrot as I sifted the final flour to about 87% extraction.  I did so because white rye in addition to whole was suggested and I don't really want to use white rye, and medium rye was something I can make via sifting.  So my compromise was such.  that was only 30  or so % of the flour so all in all its probably 95% high extraction rye in the end.   It was delicious but so were the others. I don't have a tuned pallet for these styles of bread.  

The store bought varieties I speak of have no caraway but just an off flavor.  A combo of old and preservatives?  This was hard to push even as a gift at the market with some of the folks.  For Americans I think this type of bread is something we need to learn to love.  It's not like the first taste of braised pork belly done well and how it makes us question why we waste the belly on bacon (and we love bacon).  

Well I like the definition of the styles of bread.  I'll be making many a volkenbrot for a while to get it down.  I'll play with other grains now that I know I can keep the name the same for all of them.  

Cheers

Josh

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Josh, I know the German language is not an easy one, but, please, don't scramble the poor bread's name: it's Vollkornbrot: voll = full, korn = grain, brot = bread.

Karin

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Now I've learned some German.  

Feel free to call them baygulls if you like and they'll still taste just as good.  

Josh

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Thanks, Josh, and I promise you I will correct any German tourist who doesn't how to say (or spell) "lobstah".

Karin (from Maine)

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

At what temperature do you bake the Spelt SD and how long?

Just copied your formula - I might try it soon.

Karin

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I use a gas stove. Two stones. Lava rock and steam towels. I preheat to 500. Bake with steam for 17 min then remove steam and bake rotating every 10 minutes for about 30 more minutes. 

Josh

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Do you bake at 500 degrees, or reduce the heat?

golgi70's picture
golgi70

With the oven door opening and during loading/steaming I'd say I lose a good 50 degrees right off the bat.  So I just leave my oven set at 500 through the bake.  15 minutes later the door opens again so I think it holds an ambient temp around 440 or so.  The stones are hotter but they come down as well when the cold dough hits.  But as you'll notice I do like a bold bake on my lean doughs.  I'm also using a gas oven which is worse at retaining heat than electric or so I've heard.  Feel free to adjust to your liking.  I do have two stones and load 2 loaves on each so there is 3 Kg of cold dough going in the oven as well as the doors of oven being opened more often than I'd like.  

Josh