The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Please Help

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hasratashish's picture
hasratashish

Please Help

Hi,

I have been baking for close to 6 months now and make on an average of 2 loafs of bread a week + other things. The issue is with the loaves. As seen in the picture, no matter what I do I get a finish like this or a split from one side only. Funnily enough for my first few months the loaves were perfect, now as i seem to get "better" at baking the loaves are playing up.

My Recipe is

750 Gms - Refined Flour 12.5% Protein

200 Gms - Whole Wheat Flour 13% Protein

50 Gms - Flax Powder

10 Gms - Instant Dried Yeast

20 Gms - Salt

20 Ml - Honey

630 Ml - Luke Warm Water

20 Gms - Chia Seeds

30 Gms - Pumpkin Seeds

Oven Temp 180 c for 30 minutes

Any help would be highly appreciated. Oh this is my first post and I joined the site an hour ago...happy to be here.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that makes for a fantastic sandwich!   I think you have two options.  You can let it proof a little more and hope you catch it just right or probably a better option, decorat the top with a slash to let the bread expand there under the oven's heat.

HAPPY BAKING 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi hasratashish,

The split is caused by sudden burst when the bread is loaded to the oven.   There is sudden burst caused by last gasp yeast activity, plus steam expanding the aeration already created.   If your dough is insufficiently ripe, then the yeast activity is still too great, and, the dough is not mature enough to be able to cope with the sudden lift.

So you need either more bulk proof or more final proof, or probably a bit of both to prevent what is known as a "flying top".

Best wishes

Andy

golgi70's picture
golgi70

The reason this has changed is due to you becoming more experienced and shaping your loaves tighter than at the get go.  The tighter you shape a loaf the longer it takes to proof properly.  If it means anything to you i think they look awesome.  So as long as you don't have craters in the crumb of the loaf all is well in the world

Josh

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

I really like the look of tinned breads with a good slash and bloom on the top of the loaf. As already mentioned, if schedule allows, prolong the final proof, but for a quick fix go with slashing, there's not a chance you'll get splits like in the picture if you do that.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

cover with a clean, well wrung, wet tea towel to prevent the dough "skin" from drying out as it rises. 

hasratashish's picture
hasratashish

Thank you all for taking the time to respond.

@ Mini Oven - I do put a damp cloth or oiled cling wrap on top during the second proof. For the first proof I leave in under the upturned bowl

@Mister TT - Will try the slash and report with pictures

@Josh - Thank you, the crumb in fine..no craters..its just this aesthetic aspect which bothers me. The taste is lovely too

@Andy & Dabrownman - will definitely try to to proof it longer. I typically proof it till it till it reaches the top to the tin..I'm in India and its fairly warm...second proof take 45 minutes to achive the dough rising till the top of the tin...do you recon i should let it go any higher?? maybe 2 inches over the top? Should i reduce the temperature to 170 and increase baking time to 35 - 40 minutes...would that help.

Once again...thanks for the inputs...great community

Cheers

Ashish

 

 

 

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yes both will help.

-Khalid