The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fall Multigrain Sourdough

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wassisname's picture
wassisname

Fall Multigrain Sourdough

 

Well, it’s fall and the hearty breads are calling.  This turned out to be a fun one with some elements new to my multigrain loaves. 

I have a new toy!  I got crackin’ on some rye berries with the cheapest burr coffee grinder I could find (I couldn’t bring myself to try using the good coffee grinder I already have).  I made a coarse rye meal to use in place of the rye flour that would normally have gone into a loaf like this.  I can tell this thing is going to get a workout.  It’s not up to making actual flour or large amounts of anything, but it is perfect for tinkering with any whole grain that strikes my fancy.

The other first for me was the millet and quinoa.  I don’t know what took me so long but they both worked beautifully and have a flavor different from the usual seeds and grains I use.  The only catch is getting them to just the right softness.  On my first attempt at this I gave them a hot soak by pouring boiling water over them and letting them sit overnight.  This didn’t soften them as much as I thought it might.  They were visually striking in the bread but a little hard on the teeth, at least until the bread was bagged overnight.  For the loaves pictured here they were fully cooked.  That made the bread easier on the dental work but the grains weren’t very noticeable.  Something to tinker with.

And then there is the hydration.  I give the dry weights of the millet and quinoa in the formula as a starting point, but the results can vary widely depending on how cooked the grains are and how much water you manage to squeeze out before adding them to the dough.  The dough pictured here was very, very wet. 

 

So this isn’t the most precise formula you will ever come across.  That’s kind of the point, though.  This is the sort of bread I won’t ever make exactly the same way twice.  The whole fun of multigrain is grabbing whatever sounds good and seeing what happens! 

I can’t really give a detailed method for the same reason – it’s different every time. 

This is not one of those subtle, delicate breads.  No matter how it comes together it will have loads of flavor and texture.  Perfect for the season!

Marcus

I got a chance to get out on my bike with the camera and catch the last golden bit of fall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

the bread, the trees, or the mountains. All are lovely!

That sounds like a sink-your-teeth-into-it kind of bread, and I mean that in a good way. 

Paul

wassisname's picture
wassisname

I know exactly what you mean, Paul, and thanks, that's just the sort of bread it is.  Pretty much a meal in itself.  I think maybe the scenery leaves the bread looking a little frumpy, but the bread lover in me has no problem with that!

Marcus

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

There are few great things in the world but fall trees, blue sky and beautiful mountains are 3 of them -  your bread is number 4.  Just fantastic looking inside and out.  Well done,.

Millet seeds I just throw in the dough raw, the tiny crunch and yellow beads in the crumb is want makes them unique.  Don't soak or scald hemp seeds either.   Quinoa we scald for 10 minutes, no more, and then let them soak in the fridge overnight.

Thanks for you inspiration on the pumpkin bread to go with the mice too!

Happy baking Marcus

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you, dabrownman.  Your pumpkin bread looked so great - the mice, too!  That was what I was picturing when I tried it on my loaves.  The dough had other ideas, but what can you do?  Congrats on the award!

Thanks for the tip on the grains.  I think the millet did pretty much turn to mush the way I cooked it.  Next time I will deal with them separately.  Hmmm... if I throw a few more things in this loaf it's going to head into your territory.  I think your apprentice's tastes are rubbing off! 

Marcus

 

limmitedbaking's picture
limmitedbaking

Lovely pictures Marcus and an equally beautiful crumb for all the seeds that you stuff into the dough. I love a good multigrain with its seedy and toothsome texture and the incredible taste contributed by the various grains. And definitely, the fun is in trying out various combinations of grains!

-Tim

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thanks, Tim.  I've stocking up on all sorts of grains and things, so the fun is just beginning!  It should be a very tasty winter.

Marcus

evonlim's picture
evonlim

yellow trees... beautiful breads.. what more can i ask for!

evon

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thanks, Evon!

Marcus

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely Multigrain, Marcus! Well crafted, and photogtraphed.

The scenery is breathtaking. Enjoy this wonderful bread while it lasts.

-Khalid

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you, Khalid.  This place does have some very nice moments, as does the bread!

Marcus

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Marcus,
What a delicious-looking bread. Glad your new mill is working, cracking the grains.
Those golden trees and amazing mountains - spectacular photos - thank you!
:^) breadsong

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thanks, breadsong!  I'm really excited about all the new textures I'll get to experiment with now. 

Marcus