The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

This week's baking 10/20/13

  • Pin It
dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

This week's baking 10/20/13

As previously advertised, I turned to the rye side this week. I baked a couple loaves of Greenstein's Jewish Sour Rye, which is still a favorite, especially toasted. The loaf in the photo is a 4 lb loaf of Hamelman's 3-stage 80% Rye Bread. It was baked this afternoon and is presently cooled and wrapped in baker's linen, "curing." I will not slice it for at least 36 hours. Crumb photos will follow.

I really like this bread, but I don't make this type of high percentage rye very often. Each time i do, I am sure it is going to be a disaster. The dough never really comes together in the mixer, and the boule is molded more than shaped. The loaf, when it's ready to bake, has the consistency (and color) of chocolate mouse. Yet, even when clots of dough stick to the brotform, you can scrape them off and slap them back on the loaf. And it always bakes up into a gorgeous, rustic, crusty on the outside moist on the inside, delicious exemplar of "real bread." 

I can wait to slice it, because I know how much better it will be in a couple of days. Meanwhile, the cream cheese and pickled herring are standing by. I'll go fishing for some smoked salmon tomorrow. (My sister, Ruth, says you can always find the best fishing spot for smoked salmon by watching for the circling bay gulls.)

I also made a batch of San Joaquin Sourdough baguettes this week. In contrast to the rye, these are delicious 20 or 30 minutes after they have come out of the oven.

These have been turning out so reliably good the past few months, they have become a staple. They make great sandwiches, good toast and the second best French Toast (after challah). 

Next week, I am teaching, but, if time allows, I need to make some sort of whole wheat or multi-grain breads. 

Happy baking!

David

Comments

Casey_Powers's picture
Casey_Powers

The rye bread has me curious to try baking a boule at some point.  I am looking forward to seeing what the crumb is like after 36 hours.  It is rustic ally beautiful.  The San Joaquin Sourdough looks inspiring!  That crumb is gorgeous.  The crust is just as nice.  I would love some salmon with either.  

Warm regards,

Casey

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This 80% Rye bread is a keeper for me, David. I say you've done an excellent job with a sophisticated formula.

The SJSD is, as always, stuningly beautiful.

-Khalid

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Can't wait to see the crumb of the Rye.  I am not a very seasoned heavy Rye baker but I have just begun my training.  I have made them before but I never make them often.  My plan is to make them at least once a week so i can really get the feel for it.  I have a currant/sunflower 100% wrapped and almost ready to slice.  I have low hopes as after I removed from pan to it began to buckle on the sides.  I'm guessing its underbaked but as I was baking my rye my thermometer went bust so I had to depend on timing.  Does the hollow tap apply to heavy rye breads?  It deffinately passed that test.  I also think I overhydrated (103%) accidentally did this but hoped for the best.  We shall see.  

The baguettes are a work of art by the way, crust, crumb, and fantastic scoring.  You use these for french toast?  Interesting idea.  Do you soak them overnight?  

Maybe you can beat me to the punch and make your whole wheat bake of the sprouted variety,

 

Josh

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

To make French Toast, I just soak slices of bread for a few minutes.

I have gathered from more experienced rye bakers that 103% hydration for a 100% rye is not out of order, but it requires a very long bake in a "falling temperature" environment. I don't personally have enough experience on which to base advice. In fact, none of my 3 attempts to date has been particularly wonderful. I've had really good success with 70-80% rye breads though.

Good luck with your current/sunflower rye!

David

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I must try.  You'd think it would need time to soak so the crust gets soft.  

Just cut that rye that buckled on the side.  It looks like loaf that "lost its roof" but on the side.  i baked at 500 preheat.  lowered to 400 right off the bat.  After 1 hour I lowered to 350 for 1 hour.  Then i removed from tin and put back in oven to crisp outside but I saw it buckling and let it bake out for a good 30 minutes.  Its kinda tasty.  Got a neat color from the chocolate malt I added.  But I think its underbaked based on a little gummy look around the outside.  I think it'll work as thin slices toasted.  Gonna give another shot this weekend and be sure to have a working thermometer.  Its easy to bake non rye without a thermometer and knows its done but I think in the case of whole ryes a thermometer is key.  

I'll post some pictures when i get a chance maybe the kind folks here will be able to help me get where I'm going.  

Josh

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Another lovely bake, David. 

Paul

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I've had enough experience with this particular type of "disaster" to expect good results. We'll see tomorrow.

David

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

short time, looks huge and great.  Then the fantastic SJ baguettes arrive.  I'm convinced the baguettes using SJ are the cat's meow.  A 20% whole grain variety has to be in Lucy's future.  Nice baking David and good luck with the salmon fishing.  That rye toasted with smoked salmon & cream cheese would be very tasty, filling and healthy. 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I gather that Lucy is not perturbed by "the cat's meow." The SJSD formula is about 10% whole grain. I really should try it with a boosted percentage of WW.

David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I gotta get busy too!

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi David,
This was perhaps the most wonderful baguette crumb I've ever seen, and now, looking at the crumb on the baguette you baked, I think I'm seeing double :^)
And the rye looks fabulous, too!
:^) breadsong

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

What a nice thing to say! You are too kind (but I was kind of impressed myself when I cut the baguette). It's like opening a present, isn't it, when we first slice a loaf?

David

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I sliced the rye this morning and had some for breakfast with cream cheese and hot-smoked salmon. It was delicious. The crust was chewy but not too hard. The crumb was moist and creamy but fully baked. The flavor was earthy rye with mild to moderate sour tang.

Happy baking!

David

Franko's picture
Franko

Beautiful even crumb on your 80% David, nice and creamy looking as you say, and baked through with a rich crust. Baking out these high ratio rye breads can be a challenge but your loaf is spot on, couldn't ask for a better result. I love this type of rye toasted crisp with either sweet or savoury toppings, but like you my first choice is smoked fish of some kind.

Happy eating!

Franko

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I've loved this style of bread since the first one I made. My wife, who was not fond of it at all initially, has been totally converted. This is a very good thing for two reasons. First, I make breads she particularly likes more often. Second, I like to make high percentage ryes in very large loaves, so I appreciate her help eating them while they are at their best. 

Thanks for your kind words.

David

SCruz's picture
SCruz

<<I'll go fishing for some smoked salmon tomorrow.>>

I'm envious of wherever it is that you live. Where I am, we only have regular salmon. We have to smoke it on our own after we catch it. ; - )

Jerry 

 

 

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

The crumb on your baguettes are memorizing... wow. Truly beautiful. Mind you, the rye looks just as appetizing.

Zita

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

holds99's picture
holds99

Both your rye and baguettes look terrific.

Howard

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

varda's picture
varda

to our "conversation" on my post.   If at some point I want to try another style baguette (with many different answers to my questions) I can see clearly from your post where I should start.  Beautiful work!  -Varda

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I have made enough different types of baguettes that I like that I now regard "baguette" as just another shape. There are many good approaches worth having in your repertoire, in my opinion.

David

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Those are both lovely, David.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David