The Fresh Loaf

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20% Whole Grain 9 Grain Sourdough

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

20% Whole Grain 9 Grain Sourdough

We are going to call this bake out WBD bake along with the Mice Guarding the Pumkin.  Nest year we will try to get it baked on the right day for a change - or maybe not :-)

 

We looked everywhere but couldn’t find any SD white bread.   So, for this Friday’s bake we decided to make one.  Lucy managed to find 8 whole grains to grind for the whole grain portion and then decided to throw in some semolina to make a 9 grain sourdough.

 

On Wednesday, we sifted out the 25% of the hard bits of the multigrain mix and fed that to the levain on the first feeding.  The next 2 feedings, to build the levain up to full strength, were the 75% extraction of the whole grains.  The entire lot of home milled, whole grains was used for the levain so that they would be wet the longest and less likely to destroy gluten development later.

 

Once the levain had rise 25% after the 3rd build we refrigerated it for 24 hours in the fridge to bring out even more sour.  With a proper food source, the labs will reproduce a 3 times the rate of yeast at 36 F making for more sour bread.

 

Once the levain came out of the fridge on Thursday and allowed to finish the 75% its final doubling, we autolysed the rest of the ingredients putting the salt on top.   We had some left over prune and grain soaker water from the last bake and used that for the dough and levain liquid. 

 

Once everything came together and at 10 minute intervals, we did 3 sets of slap and folds for 8.3 and 1 minute to develop the gluten and then did 3 sets of S&F’s over the next hour.   Then the dough was pre-shaped and then final shaped into a boule and placed seam side sown into a lightly rice floured basket.

 

We planned a rustic opening at the seam when it was turned out seam side up for baking without having to slash it.  The dough was bagged in a used trash can liner and immediately retarded for 18 hours overnight.

 

It nearly tripled in volume while in the fridge for some unknown reason and we thought for sure there wouldn’t be much spring in the DO, especially since it deflated so much when we picked it up in the parchment paper sling we used to lower it into the hot DO.

 

But no worries, the dough recovered nicely to spring back in the 15 minutes under the DO lid, the first 10 minutes at 475 F and the last 10 minutes at 450 F before removing the lid and turning the oven down to 425 F to finish baking.

 

At the 20 minute mark we took the boule out of the DO to finish baking on the bottom stone rotating it once 5 minutes later.  After a total of 35 minutes making the bread reached 105 F and was removed to the cooling rack.

 

It browned up a light red color, cracked at the seam and had some nice blistering too.   The DO and Betsy managed to turn out a nice looking loaf of bread but we will have to see what the crumb looks like later. The crumb turned out very soft, medium open  and moist.

The pepper jack cheese, smoked brisket melt, that Lucy made for my daughter's lunch, got the 'best samndwich ever and the best SD bread you have ever baked Dad' response. Aaaahhhh she nust want something really bad don't you think?  Got to love it though.....

 The crust was crispy but the crumbwas so soft my bread knife had a hard time slicing it straight without squishing.  The crumb would have been more open had I slid it onto a stone with the peel instead of folding it in half trying to get it into the DO :-)

It looks like lasagna in a Pyrex loaf pan but it is (2) breakfast burritos constructed with home made Chorizo.

This bread is very sour right out of the oven.  When you build a whole grain starter for sour and refrigerate it for  week, refrigerate the levain for 24 hours and then retarded the dough for 18 hours you get as much sour as you can manage with what you have at your disposal.  You just want to make sure that you have enough of the right food for the labs and yeast to eat.  If you want to eat white bread, then this one will fit the bill well enough. 

Breakfast babka toasted with butter, apple and berries.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

3.55%

Whole Rye

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Kamut

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Oat

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Wheat

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Buckwheat

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Bulgar

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Spelt

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Whole Farro

2

3

5

10

2.37%

Water

16

24

40

80

18.93%

Total

47

48

 

175

41.42%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

88

20.71%

 

 

 

Water

88

20.71%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

23.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Semolina

10

2.37%

 

 

 

AP

325

76.92%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

335

79.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.89%

 

 

 

Soaker & Prune Water 180

220

52.07%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

65.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

423

100.00%

 

 

 

Soaker & Prune Water 220

308

72.78%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

72.78%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

20.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.78%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

738

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Dinner has to start with dessert and this mixed apple crisp fits the bill.  Some smoked chicken and home made smoked Andouille sausage etouffee served over rice with green veg, a nice salad and whole grain sourdough bread to sop up the gravy as sides is tough to beat.

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Not only the bread looks wonderful, especially with the birdseye crust.  I love all the grain mixture you mix up yourself.  It has reminded me not only how lazy I'am but there is some KAF bags of mixed grain flours I ordered in the freezer.  

Very nicely done.  I love the toying of the minds with the 'used trash liner'.  I ordered bread safe humungous bags quite a while ago..haven't used them yet.  I still just proof my loaves individually in their bread bags.  

I best not let Mike see your Mexican dishes.  He loves those south of the border dinner's.  He could eat them everyday.

I have to hide my eyes from your wonderful apple crisp.  I have a hugh bowl of apples bought with all those wonderful desserts in mind and I'm trying to stay away from desserts.  Now go figure that one out.  I even managed not to shove a quick gallet into the wfo.  Now you've pushed me over the edge :) or have all these pears and apples lingering around done it.  I love the fall fruits and veggies.  Your fall salad's are so tasty looking too.  I did manage pear salad to stay off the sweet tooth.  It just hasn't worked so good.  

We don't see sunsets like that in my neck of the woods.  Sure is lovely in yours.

Sylvia 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I've been so bad on the forbidden dessert side of things lately:-) I have a rhubarb adb strawberry pie inder the apple crisp and then put ice cream and chocolate sauce on top of that.  Glad you liked the post of food, bread and sunset.  Here is the semi finished and final crisp desert adn a picture of some huge Honey Crisp apples I just got on sale at Sprouts for 99 cents  a pound - they weight. amost a pound each!  But they are the very best I have ever laid my hands on.  Happy apple and pear baking Sylvia!

Darwin's picture
Darwin

I have not had breakfast or lunch, you're killing me with these tasty looking dishes.  I have not had good andouille in years and I really miss the fruit crisp I was served as a kid by the nice cafeteria ladies.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the cafeteria ladies made too.  If you were nice to them you could always get some extra whatever when it was good.  They liked to make apple crisp since almost the entire recipe was on the federal school subsidy program - apples, sugar, flour, butter were all covered by it so it was only the spices they had to buy:-)   Pretty tough to mess up a crisp too - if the apples are good.  These fine ladies were making crisp with those old red delicious apples too, before the apple farmers ruined them with hybrid varieties that keep forever and are more red but taste horrible,.    I hear they are ripping out these new varieties and replacing them with the old ones now though - a good thing. 

Happy baking Darwin.

isand66's picture
isand66

I really like this bake DA. What a great looking crust and crumb, nice and moist chock full if goodies. All your food looks amazing as usual.
I'm not sure which one I prefer as they all look so tasty.
I've got a Challah bulk retarding to bake tomorrow hopefully. Hopefully will come out better than the dud I made earlier this week. Next will have to be a multigrain like this one.
Happy Baking!

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Making White Bread. Looks great.  Mail me some of that smoked brisket.  Man it looks good.  Have you ever made buckboard bacon?  A place up in Washington called Cured in Levainworth makes it.  Its pork shoulder cured in molasses then smoked over applewood. Its hard to choose whether to eat it raw, where it tastes like the best ham ever or to cook it up and it tastes like some of the best bacon ever.  So good.  

Whats the cheapest quality smoker I could get?  Maybe its time for me to start curing and smoking some of our local meats.  

 

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

My daughter likes this one the best and I have to say that it does taste a lot like the bread in SF before and right after 1970's when it was much more sour than ones today.  20% whole grain is just enough to give the loaf a good taste without killing off the holes completely.  You would like this bread Josh.

You can get bullet water smokers from Brinkman for $99 but they are charcoal fired or you can smoke indirectly in a kettle Weber grill too.  The problem with them is controlling the heat  at 225 - 250 F.  I have the cheapest electric  analog smoker from Materbuilt that I got a Bass Pro Shop for $159 on sale and Ski bum has the digital upscalee on.

I've smoked a lot of pork shoulder with apple wood for pulled pork sandwiches, tacos and tamales but make bacon from pork belly,  My favorite bacon is made from pork jowl though but very hard to get some that aren't already smoked,  Smoked jowl is the best for making Mexican beans too.

Smoking is like baking once addicted it is a life long endeavor :-)

Glad you like the bread and the post Josh.

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I'm certain I would like the bread with some of that brisket and bacon.  Got any farmfresh egg mayo and maybe some home made kraut too?  

I worked at a BBQ restaurant some years ago.  I was really into the BBQ smoking thing and convinced the guy to bring me on to his new business and that I'd have my baking skills to do pies, cornbread, and that I could manage some prep of savory taboot.  Before long I was doing all the smoking of the meats and running the kitchen.  Only lasted a year but I learned a lot about smoking compared to the little I knew previously.  After I bought a smoker (charcoal) and played for a while but didn't bring with me when i moved across the country.  I've thought of it many times but never pull the trigger.  I'll take a look at the Masterbuilt and see what I can find.  I have friends who smoke so guidance is readily available.  I suggest you treat a pork butt like you do the belly as for bacon and see if you love it as much as I did. Jowl bacon is better than belly bacon.  And really well prepared belly via braising, pressing, searing is the best way I've had pork belly. 

I'll let you know what I find

 

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

like bacon before you smoke it?  When I'm making cheap pastrami I take eye of round beef, like most do today instead of brisket and have to inject it and use brine with pink salt, instead of dry cure rub,  and let it soak for a week before the meat is fully cured.  Since the pork shoulder is about as thick a meat as the eye of round, would you have to inject it and brine with pink salt too?  It sure sounds great.  If I could make decent bacon using pork butt I'm all in since shoulder is about $2 a pound cheaper around here at  the times.  Ever since chefs discovered pork belly the price has mire than doubled.  It used to be you couldn't;t give it away.

It is a shame the restaurant didn't work out with your partner Josh.  With your baking skills and some great smoked meats it sure sounds like a winner to me.  That is the problem with restaurants.  Very trendy and they fail way too often.

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I was just a young employee at a restaurant not a partner or anything.  To be honest I've done brisket,ribs, chickens, chicken wings, pork shoulders, even lamb.  But I just smoked it as per BBQ eats.  You know pulled pork and the such.  I got this bacon at a charcheutrie sp???.  They make salamis, cured meats, sausages.  Check em out.  Google Cured and Levainworth WA.  I believe they ship for a reasonable price too. I on the other hand have not entered the world of curing meats.  If I buy a smoker I most certainly will and I'll use the all natural method opposed to the pink stuff.  None the less I would imagine its boneless pork should cleaned up nicely and then cured in molasses and then smoked with applewood.  Maybe its cold smoked?  Regardless.  It is of the tastiest bacon product I've ever had.  You could probably cut the butt in two or three so the curing process was similar to bacon.  I still want you to mail me some brisket by the way. 

 

Happy smoking and baking and of course eating

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

any mire brisket until the 11th of November when my daughter's boyfriend comes to visit.  He's a big strapping Navy officer so i don't know if any will be left over, He sure kikes the whole grain bread too.   I'm only making third of the whole packer   The large end was this last smoke and the middle 3rd (half point and half flat) will be on the 11th and then point I was going to smoke for bacon next time I ran out.  No worries.  I got hold of my friend at the pasta company in Glendale and hope to get some Desert Durum whole berries next week from him too.  I told him I didn't want more than 100 pounds and he immediately asked if i was going to plant it:-)  They are so careful!  I guess he could lose his job, or something worse, over getting me 5 pounds.

You can't get that pink color on the insife of any cured meat without the nitrates.  I'm pretty sure it won't be the nitrates that finally get me in the end but i might live forever because of them:-) 

Haqppy baking

holds99's picture
holds99

Your bread looks great and such a nice spread---lovely.  Everything looks delicious.

Howard

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Howard.  It all tasted great which is a bad thing for the waistline. Portion control went right out the window :-(

Happy baking

CeciC's picture
CeciC

yo. Are a really good baker! Always come up with great looking bread!  

while I'm on the treadmill n looking at ur pic. Gosh u make me soooo hungry. 

Casey_Powers's picture
Casey_Powers

This bread and the recipe just screams health.  I am so amazed by the formula you provide. The homemade chorizo and dish are really speaking to me.  I am starving over here!  I love looking at the those photos.  I eagerly anticipate the next loaf of goodness.

Warm regards,

Casey

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I used to think that when i retired that I would try my hand at another restaurant and even had a name for it Dabrownman's Deli Llama Rhama Dhama,  It would be a Jewish Deli, smoke house, bakery, have Mexican and other ethnic cuisines, bar, breweryn desert and ice cream shop ....depending on the time of day:-)

But, after being in the food business all these years and seeing so many restaurants open and fail, including the first Mexican restaurant in Germany in the early 70's that a friend of mine opened with some help from the US government and others, I thought it much less work and more profitable to cook and bake at home.  That way your customers were held hostage and would never say a bad thing about the food you make for fear of never having any made for them again :-)

Glad you liked the post

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

every once in a while.  I feel like i'm getting a rut.  3 builds for the retarded starter, refrigerate after the 3rd feed, take out of the fridge, autolyse, 3 sets of slap and folds, 3 sets of stretch and folds, preshape, shape, into the rice floured basket, bag and refrigerate for 12-30 hours, bake right out of the fridge with steam at 450 F to 500 F :-) for 15 minutes and the 15 minutes at 425 F convection till 205 F.    Doesn't seem to matter what kind of bread it is either.  I'm even slap and folding 100% whole grain breads at 100% hydration:-)  I'll have to make some ciabatta or no knead soon to break the streak :-)

Becoming a good baker is just a matter of practice and finding what works, like anything else.  If it was hard i wouldn't do it since i'm retired and don't do anything hard :-)

I've made 200 different breads over the last 20 months, posted them all, good or bad, read just about every post on TFL, looked at every video that came along and received some good advice from the folks here.  That's all it takes to get good and I'm glad you noticed.   But, to become a great baker requires you to have passion, start young and work hard at it for a long; long time.

That is way beyond my grasp or wants but, being the best baker I can be, what I originally started out to do in the first place, is plenty good enough for me.  I'm starting to get good at baking bread but it will take a lot more time to get to the best I can be, which makes it a great lifelong hobby while you are doing something else.  I will always be a closet chef first.  Plus, cooking and baking is so much fun and you get to eat what you make adn then you can walk it off!

Thanks for the kind words.  I'm not getting on a treadmill any time soon though .......and you looking at food pictures, while on one, must be considered torture:-)   

Happy baking. 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I have to get on the treadmill from just looking at your photos! Very interesting bread, and beautiful to behold.

I still miss a really good baking and cooking apple variety here in the US, my favorite baking apple, Boskoop, is unbeatable, tart and flavorful  - but not available. I planted a Jonathan Hybrid that tastes pretty good, judging from the two apples we harvested this year.

The best apples for baking I found in Maine so far, were the tiny, worm-holey ones picked at the road side from old, abandoned orchards.

I'm off to Germany in two days, planning to bring some "exotic" flours back with me.

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Honey Crisp are supposed to be the best for baking and I have to agree. I got the spelt, Kamut, rye, farro and WW planted today so I can have some organic sprouted flour in about 4-5 months.  Safe travels and hope you can find your exotic flour..  Have fun cooking and baking with your Mom!

Glad you liked the post.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yum, Yum! a food haven.

The bread looks delicious, and so is the cured meat. well done, DA!

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You could get pretty fat around here if it wasn't for some rigorous portion control going on :-)

Look forward to your next post and happy baking Khalid