The Fresh Loaf

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Prunish Multigrain Sourdough with Scald and Seeds

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Prunish Multigrain Sourdough with Scald and Seeds

We decided to make more of a white bread this week and to put some prunes in it since we haven’t put any fruits in bread since we baked babka this morning – but before that it has been a while.

 

This week was the same whole grain mix, home milled with the 25% sifted out portion fed to the levain.  We went with 82% each for whole grain and hydration.  We retarded the levain 2 hours after the 2nd build for 24 hours.  The levain was allowed to double again once out of the cold after allowing it to double after the first build.   No toadies or malts this time since we are out and haven’t made any more.

 

Our process was the same.  Once the levain came out of the fridge we autolysed the rest of the ingredients less the scald and the prunes for 3 hours as the levain was finishing its doubling on the counter.  The salt was sprinkled on top of the autolyse so we wouldn’t forget to put in the mix.  A large portion of the liquid was the scald /soaker water from the previous bake.  We saved the soaker water adn prune re-hydration water for net week's bake.

 

When the autolyse and the levain came together, we did 3 sets of slap and folds for 6, 4 and 2 minutes with a 10 minute rest in between the two.  The dough stopped sticking to the counter during the 2nd set.  We then did 3 sets of stretch and folds with 15 minute rests in between each one.

 

We incorporated the seeds on the first set of S7F’s and the prunes during the second set.  By the end of the 3rd set the add ins were well distributed.  After a 30 minute rest, we pre-shaped the dough into a boule and then did the final shaping 10 minutes later.

  

The shaped boule was immediately placed into a very lightly rice floured basket and allowed to proof for half an hour in a trash can liner before being placed into the fridge for an 18 hour retard.

 

The dough rose well in the fridge - in fact, too well at 95% proof. We let it warm up on the counter for 30 minutes as the oven was heated to 550 F after the 325 F babka bake earlier.  We used a 9x13 Pyrex pan half full of water with lava rocks for the steam this time.

 

Once the oven beeped it as at 550 F we set the timer for 15 minutes to let the lagging top and bottom stones catch up.  The boule was un-molded onto parchment on a peel, slashed and slid onto the bottom stone of the oven.

 

After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 500 F and 5 minutes later we turned the oven down to 475 F.  At the 12 minutes mark we removed the steam and turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.  13 minutes later the bread was 203 F on the inside and we turned the oven off.  2 minutes later it hit 205 F and we removed the bread to a cooling rack.

 

There was no need to let the bread crisp on the stone in an off oven with the door ajar. This bread browned up a deep mahogany that was well blistered.  One of the best crusts the BOGE, Betsy has ever managed to date.

There wasn’t much spring due to the full proof but, it didn’t collapse at all either.  Lucy called this a huge success after we waited on her babka bake for a couple of hours too long.

 

The crumb was very open, moist and soft.  The prunes lent a fine subtle sweetness to the loaf and with the honey helped to color the crust.  This is exceptional sourdough bread by all accounts and we like it very much.  It made a very fine grilled chicken sandwich for lunch - delicious!

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

15

3.67%

Whole Rye

9

9

18

4.41%

Whole Kamut

9

9

18

4.41%

Whole Wheat

10

10

20

4.90%

Whole Spelt

10

10

20

4.90%

Water

38

38

76

18.60%

Total

91

76

167

40.88%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

Flour

84

20.44%

 

 

Water

84

20.44%

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

75% Extraction Multigrain

223

54.59%

 

 

AP

102

24.97%

 

 

Dough Flour

325

79.56%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.96%

 

 

SoakerWater 180, Water

260

63.65%

 

 

Dough Hydration

80.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

409

100.00%

 

 

Soaker Water 180, Water

344

84.09%

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

84.09%

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

81.76%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

82.88%

 

 

 

Total Weight

798

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Honey

10

2.45%

 

 

Ground Flax, Sesame Seed

16

3.92%

 

 

Prunes

75         

18.36%     

 

 

VW Gluten

12

2.94%

 

 

Total

38

9.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Multigrain 75% extraction is equal parts of whole:

 

Kamut, rye, wheat  and spelt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight of the prunes and scald  is the dry weight.

 

 

Wet weight was 195 g for the scald . Weight of dough was

 

 

973 g with wet scald and re-hydrated prunes.

 

 

 

 

Comments

varda's picture
varda

burnished crust you have there DA.   And I'm sure delicious.  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and tastes like it Varda.  On day two the sour is really coming though.  A nice loaf of bread with a tinge of sweetness. The prunes and the honey must have worked their magic to burnish the crust.  The crumb is pretty open and glossy too.  There is a lot to like about this bread. Glad you like it Varda and

Happy baking 

isand66's picture
isand66

Varda is right.  This has got to be one your best looking crusts....nice and Brown and your crumb looks nice and open.  This must be a tasty bread.

Happy Baking

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

never know which bread will rise to the top. This is a good one for sure.  Very tasty even without the malts and toadies and not 100% whole grain.  The prunes must have made the crust that mahogany color.  Makes for a fine sandwich bread.

Can't wait to try it with today's smoked brisket.   Put it on at 6 AM this morning  for a 12 hour smoke so it would be done by dinner,  Couldn't resist getting another one since it is on sale for 3 days only at $1.99 an pound. When it is that cheap you have to a whole one in the bag.  This bread will really shine next to the brisket.

Glad you like the post Ian and Happy Baking

isand66's picture
isand66

Brisket!  I'm dying thinking about it at 10AM!

Lucky you...now I may need to buy one this week...$1.99 a LB is a great price for sure.  I must try some prunes soon in a bake.  I think the date bread I made had a similar color to your prune bread from the caramelized sugars.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yum, DA! very hearty and attractive loaf of bread. Well done.

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

series of high % whole grain breads of late and this one is as good as any of them. The crumb is a little more open since it isn't 100% whole grain but the crust is one of a kind.  You would like how this bread tastes Khalid. It is delicious.  Can't wait to see your next bake and

Happy Baking Khalid

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

I admit, I never had prunes before... am I missing out? Strange, seeing how that I've eaten a bunch of "exotic" fruits and vegetables here in Cambodia. 

Anyway, that's a really, really nice bake. The crust looks fantastic, not to mention the crumb. I don't think I'll get my bakes to be as good as yours. I don't think I can catch up!

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The added sweetness fits well in whole grain breads.  What can be wrong with a dried plum anyway?  I say if you like a fruit raw you will like it dried:-)  Andy makes a great Brazil nut and prune bread.  He has converted it over to SD which is much better.  I make it with more whole grains too.  The nuts are so big I do chop them in half.

Once you get the whole grains sourced and mill them, then following the formula and procedure is a piece of cake.  No mixer, malts or toadies required and this bread would bake up perfect in your mini oven too.  There is no reason you can't bake a bread just like this one.  If it were hard then Lucy would be the first to tell you that I certainly couldn't do it either.  My breads are better than last year and those were better than year before.  But, the ones from 40 years ago were much, much  better but heck, I was younger, in better shape and living in SF too...... 

You might need to get a good German baking apprentice though:-)  Glad you liked the post and good luck with your adventures Zita!