The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking with molds

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Dairy's picture
Dairy

Baking with molds

I recently was given an octopus shaped cake mold for the holidays and I plan on using bread in it. However, I can't seem to make a decision on the best way to do this because of the way that the bread will go into the mold before baking.

I was thinking on rolling it into long cylindrical pieces and then laying them out into the mold and hoping that the bread will expand into the mold while baking. Will this work or is there a better way to get this done?

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

hmm. I dont bake with molds and often fail when I bake in a bread pan :)  lol.

 

but if I were going to do that, I'd do it how you explained.  I'd make sure to make enough dough and a recipe I knew so that I was farmiliar with the dough and how it works (rises etc)

 

Thats all I can offer you but it is just kind of guessing I am sorry :S

 

Good luck! 

 

the breadman's picture
the breadman

How about seperating the dough into smaller pieces like you would for a monkey bread and scattering them about the form about an inch apart or less. When they proof and bake they'll merge but partakers will have the fun of being able to pull the bread apart easily once it is baked.

breadman

buns of steel's picture
buns of steel

Dairy, I sometimes bake bread in fairly detaiiled molds. 

 

If you look at this post, you'll see a bread I baked in a Nordicware Christmas Tree pan

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/5074/panettone-that039s-not-too-dense

 

My tip is to make sure you press the dough well into any deep "pockets" in the mold.  The first time I used this mold, some of the very tips of the Christmas tree didn't totally fill in, if I could roll the clock back, I'd really press the dough into those tips.

 

Also make sure you're working with a dough and greasing method that will release well.  So a kneaded dough with decent gluten development, versus a no-knead really sticky dough.  I sometimes use BakKlene baking spray, which is usually made for cakes, but helps ensure a good release from those detailed pans.

 

I gave my copy of the book away, but RLB's book The Bread Bible has a gugelhupf baked in a Nordicware "rose" pan, if you have the book, you could look at that recipe and see if there are any tips there too.

 

Is there a link anywhere you could find and post with a pic of the pan you have?