The Fresh Loaf

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The 100% Whole Grain, Multigrain - Mashed by Melon Test - 3 Ways

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The 100% Whole Grain, Multigrain - Mashed by Melon Test - 3 Ways

I started out to see what the keeping qualities and crumb structure of a YW /SD combo levain and a straight YW levain would be compared to a SD levain bread.  I figured that if YW alone couldn’t supply a decent keeping quality and was better in combination with SD for this while still mellowing the sour and providing YW’s unique crumb structure - there was no sense making a straight YW bread if you could get the benefits of it and still get the SD keeping quality with a combo levain.

  

Sounds great except my apprentice wanted to do an even more important retarded proofing test too, a test she sort of snuck in there while I was asleep.  At first I was a little miffed but heck, life is too short and after contemplating it, I thought the YW overYW / SD melon recovery test was a great idea. Why not kill 3 breads with two melons!

 

We took one of favorite 100% whole grain, home milled multigrain SD breads with whole berry 24 hour soak and 4 seeds, and made it 3 ways: SD, SD /YW Combo and YW levains.  To mix things up a little bit, 1 hour after the 3rd feeding, we retarded all 3 for 72 hours to bring out the sour in the SD portions.

  

As per our usual when home milling we took the 25% sifted out portion of bran germ and what nots and feed that to the levains.  They don’t seem to care and nit is a great way to get the hard bits of the wholegrain wet for as long as possible.  The grains used were 20% each whole berry: barley, Kamut, spelt, rye and wheat.  The AP in the formula was brought up to whole grains with the inclusion of the appropriate amount of Toadies.

 

We let the levains finish doubling after removing them from the fridge which took 3 hours.  We started the autolyse for everything else less the soaked whole berry, pumpkin and sunflower seeds 1 hour before the levains came out of the fridge to warm up.  We used exactly 2 bottles (11 oz each at 5.4% alcohol – no tasting) of Full Sail’s Session Black Lager for the autolyse liquid resulting in a 4 hour autolyse  for the 75% extraction flours, malts, VWG, sesame and flax seeds.

 

We divided the autolyse in half.  One half we mated with the SD levain to make a straight SD bread.  The other half we divided in half again and made one into a straight YW bread and the other half go the SD/YW combo levain.  All of these whole grain breads came in at over 90% hydration but less than 92%

 

Each got our new 3 sessions of slap and folds that Lucy shamelessly stole from Josh – this time 10 minutes, 5minutes and 3 minutes and 3 sets of S&Fs where the left out soaker and seeds were incorporated on the 1st one and fully distributed by the end of the 2nd set.

 

We were starting to like this method but doing 3 breads at a time was 46 minutes of slap and folds – whey.  But, at least I know that with the holidays looming, I’m ready for Michael Wilson’s required 30 minute minimum of panettone slap and folds. 

 

After a very short 30 minute rest the 3 separate dough balls were shaped.  The two smaller ones were going into cocktail loaf pans, due the high hydration and sized to have a 1 pound finished weight.  The larger lump was shaped into an oval and placed into a rice floured basket.  Once shaping was complete all 3 went into a used trash can liner and into the fridge for a 20 hour retard.

 

When I checked them at the 12 hour mark; midnight and all was well.  All three had already doubled and the cocktail loaves had risen above the rim in the middle.  I was worried that they would over proof in another 8 hours but figured they were good and cold after 12 hours and that the yeast would shut down while the dough got a little more sour.

 

About here is when I think things started going strange.  Lucy got out of bed and went out the doggie door next to the kitchen to do her business.  Right after she came back in I heard a thump coming from the family room or kitchen.

 

Lucy says everyone should start their day enjoying a good breakfast featuring Hanseata's Challenge Bread and have a fine lunch in the middle of the day of seafood pho, feta salad and Tzitzel pastrami sandwich.

When I investigated I couldn’t find anything wrong other than Lucy had a satisfied look on her mug.  Normally she would bark if a thump happened in the darkened house but not a peep came out of her this time.  So I figured it wasn’t an evil intruder and it was probably just the ghost of my previous baking apprentice; Gretchen, who sometimes comes out to play with Lucy late at night.

 This weeks smoked meat is maple and brown sugar cured, apple wood smoked bacon.  If you don't make your own bacon, you are missing out on what real bacon should taste like when made properly without nitrates and used to make a BLT.

At the 20 hour mark I went to get the trash can liner and bread out of the fridge and I noticed that the cantaloupe and Honey Dew melons I had purchased at the Sprouts were sitting right one top each of the two tinned loaves.  Both had been smashed down from their midnight high marks!

A mixed apple and stone fruit crisp is a fine desert for any dinner and no dinner is complete without a salad.

 

I though it was an accident since I had piled them up above and behind the bread in the fridge and perhaps they were unsteady and just rolled onto the bread, but nnnoooo!  Lucy had decided to do a Mashed by Melon Test on the YW and YW / SD tinned loaves to see if one could recover better than the other in the heat of the mini oven when baked.

 

YW left SD right and the combo in the middle.

We decided to bake the two tinned melon mashed loaves first so they couldn’t recover at room temperature.  They were placed in the tins seam side up hoping they would crack naturally on the seam anyway - if they cracked at all.  We chucked them onto the 500 F mini oven with 1 of Sylvia’s steaming cups and 1/3 C of water thrown into the bottom of the oven’s the door was shut to supply an instant burst of steam. 

 

Sourdough

After 2minutes the temperature was turned down to475 F and then down to 450 F 2 minutes after that.  After a total of 15 minutes, the steaming cup was removed and the oven turned down to 425 F, convection this time.

YW / SD combo 

5 minutes later, we removed the bread from the tins and turned them upside down in the mini oven to make sure the bottom got as well done as the top. After 5 minutes upside down the bread was rotated 180 degrees and flipped back over.

 

Yeast Water

In 5 more minutes the bread was 203 F and the mini oven was turned off.  When the bread hit 205 F on the inside it was removed to the cooling rack.  32 minutes total time in oven was all it took.

 

They both recovered somewhat from the Melon Mashing but the straight YW one recovered fully and not a hint of the MM was observable.  Plus one - for the YW over the YW / SD for the full Melon Mash recovery.

 

Combo YW / SD

We redid the entire process again with the oval in the basket.  This time the bread stuck in the basket and was deformed in one place so we immediately had a Basket Deformation test going for this loaf.   Lucy wanted to drop a melon on it too but we caught her just in time.

 

Soudough

The SD oval was out of the fridge for 45 minutes to warm up but was still cool when it was un-molded and slashed. Before going into the mini with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming cups this time.  We used the same schedule as before including the flipping over and rotating; 15 minutes of steam and 17 minutes with out steam - with a falling temperature and convection with the no steam portion.

 

YW / SD

The oval spread mostly, but did spring and bloom a little.  All the bread browned well on top but the big blisters were hiding somewhere else this time for some reason - Tiny ones were there agin though.   The crust was crisp as usual though.  Can’t wait to see the crumb of these 3 different but similar breads and how much different the taste is and how the keeping qualities compare.  As you can see the crumb is fairly open for these 100% whole grain breads.  All are soft, moist and tender. with the YW more so.  The YW has no sour and the SD / YW has a light tang and the SD is tangy as one could want.

Lucy voted this the best bread for a sandwich ever - especially when it is paired as a brie, homemade pate & bacon lettuce and tomato sandwich.

We love SD so it is no surprise we like SG bread the best - by far -  with the SD /YW second but those who don't like sour would likely prefer the YW.  They are excellent breads and would likely be nearly as good without the Session Black Lager and,  without the beer, the bread would have a lower GI and perfect for those with diabetes.   The crust stayed a little crisp but cooled much softer but it was very tasty on all 3 versions.  Now to see if the YW versions can withstand a week of counter and still be edible.

The last monsoon dust storm was yesterday for the year it seems and today feels like the first day of fall with a high of 90 F 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

0

10

2.44%

Whole Rye

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Kamut

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Barley

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Wheat

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Spelt

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Yeast Water

15

30

55

100

24.39%

Total

40

60

110

210

26.83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

105

25.61%

 

 

 

Water

105

25.61%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

22.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

50

12.20%

 

 

 

Whole Kamut

50

12.20%

 

 

 

Whole Barley

25

6.10%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

50

12.20%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

50

12.20%

 

 

 

AP

80

19.51%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

305

74.39%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.71%

 

 

 

Black Lager 283, Water 29

312

76.10%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

102.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

410

100.00%

 

 

 

Black Lager 283, Water 29

417

101.71%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

101.71%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

48.63%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

91.05%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

942

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

4

0.98%

 

 

 

White Malt

4

0.98%

 

 

 

Toadies

20

4.88%

 

 

 

Ground Flax, Sesame Seed

20

4.88%

 

 

 

Pumpkin, Sunflower Seed

40

9.76%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

20

4.88%

 

 

 

Total

108

26.34%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Black LagerSD and YW with Soaker & Seeds

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

0

10

2.44%

Whole Rye

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Kamut

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Barley

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Wheat

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Whole Spelt

3

6

11

20

4.88%

Yeast Water

15

30

55

100

24.39%

Total

40

60

110

210

26.83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the total weight for bothe levains.  Each levain was 105g total one

had 10 g of SD stater and the other didn't.  All the liquid for both was YW.

 The Melon Mashing Mama

Comments

GregS's picture
GregS

I'm not too sure about that "used trash can liner" you mentioned. Does it impart something special during the rise ;-)

GregS

annie the chef's picture
annie the chef

I'm eyeing for your apple wood smoked bacon and drooling. What a treat!

Big bake this time, Da.  Glad you have found a version that you like.

Annie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is about twice the normal Friday bake weight but 3 times the loaves.   Lucy doesn't mind when her recipes for bread turn out this well.  Will be interesting to see how well the YW bread keeps compared to the SD or SD/YW.

The bacon is very good too. I did some pastrami spice to the normal maple and brown sugar, salt cure - no nitrates required since you don't want it pink like pastrami:-)

We whipped up a $6 bread this time instead of our usual $5 bread  - because of the black lager:-)

Happy baking Annie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

sense that it has wrapped many a loaf of bread for proofing or retarding or both. When it gets a hole in it they i use it for trash and get a new, unused one for bread.  But soon it too is well used :-)   Nothing special - just the cheapest bag I can find that will still hold warm or cold air.

Happy baking

Skibum's picture
Skibum

. . . making me hungry. Once again beautiful, complex loaves and wonderful;food presentation. Your bacon looks SO GOOD I may have to invest in a small smoker . . .  Okay Bass Pro's here I come!

Another amazing bake and feast dman!!!

Regards, Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

smoker at Bass Pro Shops.  If I was going to do it again I might  get the 40".  The 30" you have to hang your ribs or cut them down.  I cut them anyway since one side is so much thicker than the other and they need a different amount of smoke and time in the smoker.

The smoker won't smoke under 225F  None do unless they have a cold smoke attachment  and I don't smoke at less than 235 - 250 F.  I think you can get a cold smoke attachment for this smoker from Masterbuilt but I'm mot sure if you want to make lox or cold smoke bacon at 140F.   I smoke my bacon to a minimum 150 F on the inside, this one was 160 F. I can eat the bacon raw on sandwiches like the one paired with pate that is featured in this post - no problem and it takes half the time to fry up if you want it crisp.  The bacon just tastes better when smoked to 150 F.

Glad you liked the post Ski.  These are some fine tasting 100% whole grain breads that are healthy and tough to beat taste wise.

Look forward to your next creation Ski.  

Skibum's picture
Skibum

. . . the Masterbuilt 2 door propane smoker.  My gas grill does an excellent job of grilling but a poor job of smoking. A friend and neighbour has a Weber charcoal smoker and makes some of the best ribs I have ever tasted, so a smoker is next on the list. I REALLY miss slow smoked ribs! I am thinking this unit for $100 might make sense:

http://www.basspro.com/Brinkmann-Gourmet-Electric-Smoker/Grill/product/16264/

Yup, a smoker goes on the list before flooring to finish my kitchen reno!  You got me going again dab!!!

Regards, Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Charcoal water smoker for years.  It worked great and the smoked meats were top notch,  The $99 electric one would be better if you can control the temperature well enough.  The cheapest Masterbuilt, like I have, you control the temperature like you do an electric skillet, - easy and works great.

Don't get a propane smoker - you will regret it -  no way to control the heat, very expensive to operate and just as much hassle as charcoal.  Electric is the only way to go if you ask me and the best is the cheapest one where you can control the heat.

Smoking and curing meat is a lot like bread making and just as fun.  Once you figure it out  then you start making crack meats and it is all over :-)  

Skibum's picture
Skibum

I have spent most of the morning looking a smokers on line and will drive in to Bass Pro on Monday when it is quieter, I appreciate the comments on propane! Okay, electric it is. Now I have to start reading up on smoking meat . . .

Skibum's picture
Skibum

After reading about smokers, smoking meats etc all day, I am nearly drooling and will go to Bass Pro at he opening in the morning and pick up my smoker. At my age it will be the first and likely last smoker I buy, so I am going for a good one:

http://www.basspro.com/Masterbuilt-30-Elite-Digital-Electric-Smoker/product/1210270941325/

Ribs for dinner tomorrow!  It is truly all over now . . .

Thanks for the inspiration! Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

No holding you back now!  Piling smoked meats on some fine bread is in your future!  You got the digital chip feeder  side vent upgrade to my analog do nothing fancy:-)   You ave gone upscale compared to mine but you won't ever regret it.    Now for a grain mill....

Happy Smoking Ski!

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Sadly, I am seasoning the unit and by the time I drove to and fro an hour or so each way, got things unpacked - extremely well packaged, had to use a utility knife to cut all the plastic ties and set up, I discovered I had to seaqson the unit. Sadly no ribs tonight.  Lunch tomorrow!

I briefly considered the stainless steel version of this cooker with the window so I could watch smoke TV, but sense kicked in when I realized the glass would blacken and make this feature useless. As well a single ski bum on a fixed income must compromise in places!

Anyhow, I ponied up for this unit as i has some insulation and a door gasket. These would not be necessary in hot AZ, but here in cold AB, it is definitely a consideration. We have snow down below tree line @ 6,500 feet for the past couple days and I am actually looking at an insulation blanket of sorts to sort of green things up here when smoking a 20 - 30 F which is normal in winter. They sell kits to insulate your tank type hot water heaters here in the home improvement stores and I will modify one of these kits for winter smoking . . .

So my friends Marg and her family, flood dsiplaced friends are coming for dinner tomorrow and I promised spaghetti and meat balls. Normally I crisp the meatballs on stove top and they cook in thew tomato sauce. After the crisp, I am thinking of putting the meat balls into the smoker for an hour and then into the sauce. Okay dabrownman, as smoke master here, I am looking for your comments and suggestions. TIA

Skibum's new toy. I can't wait to try this out!!!!! :-)

Best regards, Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I ddin't read the 'what to do when new instructions' that came with mine and I never seasoned it.......but if it isn't seasoned by now there is no hope for it.    Your smoker is a very nice one and your really got a lot of smoker for the money and the more insulated and sealed the smoker the way better is for you. 

First thing I would do is get it off the ground.  In your climate it will rust where it touches and bending over is drag anyway.  Mine came with legs to get it a foot off the ground or so.  I keep mine under the patio roof so no weather can get to get except the wind.   You don't want to plug it in with an extension cord, too much resistance and the element won't heat properly so you are probably under the patio too.

Make sure you smoke everything on a separate rack with a pan underneath to catch the grease.  You don't want to be cleaning this thing.  To be safe put aluminum foil on the bottom to catch anything that might drip down.  Since yours is 30"like mine a 9 x13" baking pan works great and just fits the width of the smoker and I have a  wire cooling rack that fits it but any rack over the top of it will work

I make all kinds of smoked sausages, pastrami but haven't  smoked any Italian sausage as it is usually fresh and have not smoked a meat ball either - but it sure sounds fantastic after yoiu mentioned it.  I think the way to do is to pan fr them up to get some color on them, not quite done and then smoke them at 250 F for an hour  to finish them off.  Sounds really fantastic.

The smoker will take a half hour to get hot and produce smoke so get it going when you start to make the balls.   The meat should be browned just in time for the smoker to be ready.

I'm really happu for you SKI  - you are going to love smoking as much as bread baking.   Any questions just ask.  

Skibum's picture
Skibum

. . . in his haste to get smoking, forgot to add the water . . . They were still killer ribs.  I did add the meatballs after the crisp for about an hour then finished in the tomato sauce. It added a nice light smokey flavour to things and is a keeper. I also smoked some Western Bratwurst and while tasty, prefer my brats grilled. I ordered a brisket today and will try your home cured bacon. I'm getting hungry just thinking about that project! Ribs again tonight. . . 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and ribs turn out well.  If the brats are cured then I like them lightly smoked and then grilled.  If they are fresh brats, then i like to steam them in a steamer for couple of minutes to get them to swell up and then on the grill they go.   Two of my other favorite things to smoke are pork shoulder for pulled pork and smoked turkeyy for Thanksgiving or any other time.   Same rub as ribs for both.

You will notice that the water left in the pan is smokey water and quite brown.  Simmer it down to a thicker consistency and you have a liquid smoke replacement not that you need that now:-).  If you put flour in the water pan rather than water you will make some smoked flour for bread baking.  I think it was Evon Lim who posted a bake with smoked flourt - which perked my interest.  A little of this smokey flour goes a long way in my book.   I haven't managed a really good bread baking with it yet but Lucy might. 

isand66's picture
isand66

Make sure when you get your brisket it's as big as you can get as I find the bigger the better.

Also, you want to make sure you have a good mop sauce to keep things moist.  I like to put a rub on it the night before and also have been putting either a mustard based wet rub or oil based (like Italian dressing) wet rub and have had the best success with this.

Look forward to hearing how it comes out.

I have a charcoal smoker I use and also my kettle Weber which does take a lot more effort than the kind you and DA use.

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Well this curing and smoking meat has grabbed my attention as much a bread baking!!!!! :-)

Doing S. Raichlen's St. Louis style ribs tonight: marinated in lemon juice and apple juice for an hour in the fridge, then his dry rub and 11/2 hours in the fridge and now smoking @ 225F with apple wood chips. I smoked the ribs for 31/2 hours adding Heinz baked beans for the last hour of smoke, stirring at the half. Sorry, no time to make scratch baked beans today . . .

Dman, you are right, this meat smoking business is as interesting as baking bread. I have spent some time perusing this site:  Amazing Ribs.om

http://www.amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/making_bacon_from_scratch.html

Some great information here, but I would LOVE I if dabrownman would post his bacon recipe for the wonderful bacon shown above? Every time I look at your bacon my saliva jets go on full tilt!  Can't wait!

Well my pork belly is on order -- not a shelf item here in Canmore and brisket is next!  It is hard for a single ski bum to consume an entire brisket by himself and even with a new higher capacity fridge/freezer, I may have to go with more modest sized cuts . . .

My thoughts are also turning to steak, pan blackened, then finished in the smoker. For a moment, I was worried this thread was getting off topic, but we all eat bread with smoked meat, so it fits and floyd would no doubt approve. It also seems that I am not the only TFL'er amazed by your home cured and smoked bacon.  Thanks for the inspiration dab!!!!!

No drip pans today. There is a drip tray on he bottom of this unit which is angled to let the fat run down into the water container. I figured if I let fat drop onto this hot surface, directly over the smoke chip box, would add some more smoke flavour. The ribs evaporated last night and I think I got 2. Tonight, I will make up for that! Dinner in T - 2:00.

Best regards, Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Brown Sugar Maple Cured Smoked Bacon

Ingredients:

2 1/2 ounces - kosher salt or Sea Salt bi salt with iodine in it - I use pink Himalayan Sea salt – not pick curing salt which has nitrates in it.
1/4 cup dark brown sugar
1/4 cup maple syrup - No substitute
5 pound slab of pork belly, with skin OK.   I take the skin off before curing and my pork belly is usually half as big.  The skin will come off easier after it is smoked 

Mix everything together well

Massage the pork belly on all sides with the mixture.

Place belly on a wire rack held above a suitable size tray to catch any drippings and cover with plastic and put in the fridge. You can do this in a plastic bag too by removing all the air and refrigerating.

Turn belly over twice a day, recover with plastic.  After 4 days a small belly like mine will be cured and firm to the touch.  Bigger pieces and those with skin on will take longer.  If leaving the skin on cut the skin through in a diamond shape to let the cure get in there better

Remove the belly from the fridge and rinse the cure off completely then soak the belly for a half hour in water to reduce the remaining salt.  Pat dry and let the cured pork sit in the fridge on a rack uncovered for 12 hours to dry the skin.  

Smoke the belly at 225 F over apple wood skin side down for about 1 hour, flip it over for an hourof smoke\and then let it finish smoking skin side down for the last hour.  Smoke as low as your smoker will go and still produce smoke!  You want more smoke then heat to slowly get the internal temperature to 150 F.  Stick the probe in from the side to the middle not from the top   You can also cold smoke for several hours at a 140 F temperature but I want the bacon partially cooked  and my smoker won’t cold smoke anyway.

You can also spread the bacon with a little more maple syrup and brown sugar after the cure and right before smoking.  You can sprinkle on some pastrami or BBQ spices, cracked pepper, soy sauce or just about anything else to come up with your own bacon recipe.

Happy bacon smoking Ski

Skibum's picture
Skibum

You are DMAN! I have my pork belly ordered. The ribs were improved with the addition of water. I have chicken breasts and steelhead brining for today's smoke. Just to keep it fair to Floyd, I have a batch of KF's Overnight Country Blonde on the go. This is FUN!

Best regards from a Smokin' skibum!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

smoked salmon is just killer.  You guys get such great fish up there a cold smoking attachment might be worth it for you if you smoke delicate things like fish or want to do bacon at 140 F.  White fish, not the color but the name of the fabulous fresh water Canadian fish that is part of Grand Slam for fresh water fishing, would be ungodly too.  One of my finest fishing moments, and there have been a few,  was catching the grand slam in one day - 7 miles south of the Arctic circle in Saskatchewan the 2nd week of August..... in a snow storm.

Tonight is bacon wrapped fresh Ahi Tuna ....here.  Since the bacon is already cured and cooked, a quick sear for the tuna will be the cats meow if we can keep 5 of Ian's apprentices t bay. 

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Ahi Tuna wrapped in home made bacon is now on the list. I have never fished in northern Saskatchewan and that is also on the list . . .

So dab, you have got me hooked on:  1.  sourdough or levain baking; 2. smoking my own meat; 3. plan to fish up in N. Saskabush. This is getting expensive, but so far has been a ton of fun and mighty tasty too!

Nothing like a fresh caught and cooked grand slam whitefish. I figure maple smoked steelhead with some maple syrup drizzled on for the finish just might be the ticket! Well, and as Canadian as maple syrup . . . Well smoker is up to temp, maple chips loaded and time to load the fish and chicken. 

Thanks again dab!  Smokin' Brian

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Pork belly down!

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

So much eye candy...all your meals are abundant and colorful and nutritious to boot. Well done....you and the bread...and the bacon. c

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I can attest to how tasty it was as it disappeared.  Meat & bread go well together which is why you have to make your own unique beer - just to have something decent and interesting to wash it all down with! Those three things aren't complete without the others in my book.  When done right, then ....all the planets can line up and there can be real joy and happiness in the world..... if it wasn't so totally screwed up :-)

Happy Baking Trail  

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Beautifully done, DA!  The crumb on the loaves look delicious and perfect beside your healthy meals. You especially have me drooling over the bacon, bacon!  I have to pay dearly for ASB and I bet it's not nearly as good as yours.  It's just lovely, enjoy it.  I bet you do : )  

My mom made bacon and eggs a lot..one of the best things was the bread sometimes soda bread served with it..fried in a little bit of the bacon grease.  

Sylvia   

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

knock off one of my all time bucket list items, home made, cured and smoked Irish bacon.  As you know, there is nothing like it and how far can black and white sausages be behind?  I have many Irish friends from my working days, instead of playing days and they will soon hopefully be sending me their recipes from all over Ireland. :-)

Soda bread fried in bacon grease and slathered in sausage gravy with an over easy egg has to be the breakfast of Druids and Irish Fairies.  I think we should treat ourselves to it as soon as possible :-)  I'm going for the Ballymaloe Irish brown bread in the freezer! 

I'm glad you like the post Sylvia and Happy Bacon :-)

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Excellent post, Dab! A very insightful and pleasurable read.

Of the three, I'd probably enjoy the YW/SD combo the most as I prefer breads with a little sour. Also can't wait to hear about the comparative keeping qualities of your breads.

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

this recipe made with a Tartine or Forkish SD starter would be much easier and better than a YW and SD combo levain but the crumb would be less moist, more regular and not as sweet.  I hope the keeping quality of the YW is on par with the SD.  I've never had any YW bread last long enough to know.

My favorite bacon is a Far East based one with soy sauce, dried shrimp, fish sauce, star anise, Szechuan peppercorns and the same ingredients found in 5 spice powder without the cinnamon.  Sounds like some kind of Chinese pork belly and it tastes fantastic:-) Glad you like the post Zita.

I missed your Day of the Dead, bony, spiky octopus bread this year.

Happy baking Zita

isand66's picture
isand66

Wow...at first I thought you added melon in your breads but now I get the gist of the mad Melon caper and I'm speechless!

Max told me he has to stand up for the much maligned Lucy and says it must have been one of those Arizona Native American ghosts who did it.

Anyway, love your experiment and looks like another sure fire winner.

Just finished some pizza on the Weber grill for my father in laws last meal before taking him to the airport.  Probably not as good as the Ken Forkish ones but I didn't have enough time to make that dough and opted for a version of Peter Reinharts SD with some sprouted wheat and mostly 00 Caputo flour.

I will start on my Challenge bread soon now that my guest will be gone and I should have more time.

Have a great weekend.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

these breads were very similar to Lucy's take on Karin;s Challenge bread without the oats, prune juice and potato flakes and subbing in the Session Black Lager for the liquid and pumpkin seeds.  This one turned out just as good and tasty but with a more open crumb this time.  You will have a lot of fun with the challenge bake and probably not have Ghosts of Apprentices Past - Gretchen Ghosts wrecking havoc in the fridge on proofing dough.  I mean, you have Max and his 5 cohorts to take care of those emanations and Lucy just encourages them.

The pizza must have been a treat for your FIL even if he had to settle for a PR SD sprouted caputo crust!

I'm glad you liked the post and we do like this bread very much.

Looking forward to your challenge bake.  Lucy says high to Max and is jealous of him for having so many kitties to mess with :-)

isand66's picture
isand66

Max's kitty brothers and sisters still don't want to play with him so we've been taking him to a dog park where he's been having a blast.  He is only 18 lbs but he only likes hanging out in the 25 lb and over section.  He is fast like a rabbit and loves chasing and being chased by dogs 5 times his size.  He loves to do body rolls and pop back up and darts away.  I get tired just watching all the energy he expends.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the bottom diddn't show up? For some reason....Lucy suspects gremlins or perhaps boggart dazed wizards

isand66's picture
isand66

Oh....and that bacon....I have no words....just torture to look at...I think that would be an inhuman torture device...just put a hunk of your bacon, some ribs, brisket and pulled pork in front of your subject and they will crack in no time! :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of course but our 2 personal favorites are smoked boneless chicken thighs and any number of sausages.  The Germans, all  by themselves, have 1,000 different sausages and every one I have made or tried was just great.   Then the Italian ones and Spanish ones, African ones, European, Far East.......there are more sausages then there are breads!  Lucy has some Spicy African Merguez and Cajun Andouille curing just waiting for the finishing smoke.   I've even started smoking fresh Mexican Chorizo ,,,,what's the world coming to?

Here are the chicken thighs with some very nice Mexican beans that Lucy smoked BBQ style.

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Smoked boned chicken thighs!  On the list. Smoked baked beans! are a fine idea that will make a fine side for tonight's ribs. What is is Guy Fieri says when he starts to drool, something like the flavour jets have turned on, just looking at your food!

isand66's picture
isand66

Holy sausage world!  I've not ventured into making may own yet but I certainly share your passion for eating them.

Will have to try those thighs for sure.  Please send me the recipe when you get the chance if you don't mind.  

Thanks

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Here you go, just let the boneless thighs air dry uncovered in the fridge for a couple of hours before running this on and then let it sit covered in the fridge for 12 hours. Makes a good sausage spice too.

BBQ Rub

¼ C brown sugar

1 tsp cracked black pepper

1/2 tsp each; dry mustard, cayenne pepper, smoked paprika, smoked chipotle pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, ancho chili powder, salt, ginger, thyme, oregano, Italian seasoning, cumin and poultry seasoning, crushed red pepper

1/4 tsp each allspice, cloves

Mix all together thoroughly.

Bring the chicken to room temperature as the smoker heats up.  Smoke at 250 F for 3 hours until the temp in the thick part reaches 165 F .  No sauce necessary

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks

Mebake's picture
Mebake

What a lovely whole grain adventure this was.  I like the water melon test.

And, how on earth do you get away with no flour markings on your loaves ?

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

was sticking to my non commercial baskets from Goodwill,  I started using Rice and AP flour mix but they still stuck sometimes.  I noticed that they were always sticking on the sides and never on the bottom so I investigated further.  The many ridges on the sides of these baskets were the problem.

On the bottom, when the basket was turned upside down, to dump the dough out, the sides of the ridges were vertical and the weight of the dough just pulled itself out of the them - less friction due to vertical sides - no worries.  But the ridges on the sides of the baskets whether right side up or upside down  when dumping out the dough, the ridges were horizontal and really hung on to the dough..

So to fix this problem I use straight rice flour with no AP and put a light dusting over the whole basket and then turn it over and lightly rap it on the counter keeping the basket as horizontal to the counter.   Most of the flour falls off the bottom of the basket because the sides of the ridges are vertical but more rice flour stays in the horizontal sides of the ridges on the sides of the basket.   I then lightly re-dust the sides of the basket only before plopping the dough in the bottom.

You will see in the pictures where there is some rice flour showing on the sides of these loafs that were proofed in baskets.  Since most of my bakes tend to be more whole grains and are in the 80-100% hydration range now a days - they can still be very sticky.  So sometimes, like this bake, after the dough goes into the basket I will lightly dust the edge of the dough closest to the sides of the basket - anout 1 inch wide - assuming that this will be the part that eventually touches the basket as the dough rises.

Seems to work without having too much flour show upon the finished dough allowing the basket markings to really come through.  Sometimes the dough still sticks a little like this time but usually with a light rap and a little tist of the basket the dough eventually comes loose with just a little damage that the oven heat will fix up.

Lucy wants to do the water melon mashing proof test on every bread from now on:-)  She found it fascinating that a previous baking apprentice was still lurking in the kitchen ether and working her melon magic:-)

You would like this bread Khalid - healthy, nutritious and delicious.

Happy baking and we look forward to your next bake.

    

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

with the results of Lucy's keeping qualities experiment.  This morning both the YW and the SD/YW tinned versions of this bread had mold on them.  So both managed to be edible for almost 5 days when stored on the counter wrapped in plastic after being cooled and sliced.    I never store bread for days on the counter though.  It only lasts 3 days at most.