The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pullman Pan

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kah22's picture
kah22

Pullman Pan

Need som advice?

Bought 2 Pullman pans the other day (20x 11x 10 cm) but can't figure out what size of a loaf that would make.

I'm working from the following French recipe:

10g unsalted butter
20g fresh yeast
500g strong white bread flour
10g salt
50g full fat milk
300ml water (the book I'm following opts for high hydration bread)
a little butter for greasing

According to the recipe that should be sufficent for 2 x 500g (20-22cm long) but the loaves don't reach anywhere near the top of the tin.

I don't know how to do the calculations so can anyone tell me what quantities I would need for these 2 loaf pans, or indeed for a single pan.

As always many thanks for your help.

Kevin

 

Ford's picture
Ford

According to my experience with my recipe and my loaf pans (not Pullman), your recipe should be sufficient for one Pullman pan.  I suggest that you double the recipe!

I calculate for white bread dough 0.24 oz/cubic inch, or 0.42 g/cc.  For whole wheat dough 0.26 oz/cubic inch or 0.44 g/cc.

Ford

suave's picture
suave

0.42 is quite a bit, I usually do 0.35, full 20% less.

breadman1015's picture
breadman1015

I generally bake about 33-34 ounces of dough in a 13" x 4" x 4" Pullman pan. That works out to be about 0.16 ounces per cubic inch. For your pan, I would guess that you should have between 600 and 650 grams per pan.

Randy

Ford's picture
Ford

Hello all,

I guess my bread is heavier than yours.  At least Keven got some answers. Take your pick,Keven, we all agree that you need to increase the amount of dough per pan.

Let us know how much dough you found to be the right amount for you.

Ford

pepperhead212's picture
pepperhead212

You will have to learn by experimenting, but I found out early on that baking wet dough in a pulman pan will result in an uneven crumb - sort of wet and more open in the middle, with about 1/2" of very fine bread around the perimeter,  as well as the sides sinking in when cooling.  The dough seemed way too dry in the original recipes designed for pullman pans (pain de mie), but when I tried other recipes in the pans, that is what I got.  Yet the dryer dough resulted in the perfect pain de mie.   Anyone else have this experience?   

kah22's picture
kah22

Guys, thanks for your answers to date: I'll be making some bread this evening and the general opinion seems to be that I need to increase my amounts. So I think I'll start by increasing my recipe by 10 perceent that will give me

11g unsalted butter
21g fresh yeast
550g strong white bread flour
10g salt (i'll leave that as is, I normally wouldn't use that amount anyway.)
55g full fat milk
330ml water (the book I'm following opts for high hydration bread)
a little butter for greasing

We'll see how that works. If it needs altered then my next step would be to either increase the original by 10 percent or according to how the loaf turns out decrease the liquid back to their original.

Nothing beats a try!

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne

How does one go about determining Ounce/Cubic Inch?  Are there some published tables or is this just some thing that you have done?  Also would this be an ounce of uncooked dough to the Cubic inches of baked dough?

 

Thanks, this is just another metric that I've not seen discussed here before.

 

Dwayne

kah22's picture
kah22

Hi guys I promised I'd get back and let you know how I was getting on. Wasn't baking any Pullman loaves of late but had a go at one last night using my original formula
10g unsalted butter
20g fresh yeast
500g strong white bread flour
10g salt
50g full fat milk
300ml water (the book I'm following opts for high hydration bread)
a little butter for greasing
but this time putting it in one instead of two tins.

I found the result pretty satisfactory. The dough rose to the very top of the tin and I had a little trouble getting the lid on but the loaf did turn out as expected. Next time I bake one I think I'll reduct my quanties by 10 percent and see what that does. I'm assuming there should be a little bit of space left in the tine to give that initial lift the dough gets when it is put into the oven.

That's a good question that DwaYne asked;

How does one go about determining Ounce/Cubic Inch?

 

suave's picture
suave

It's not ounce/cubic inch of the dough, it's ounce of the dough/cubic inch of the pan.