The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Which Mixer?

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Dina-Marie's picture
Dina-Marie

Which Mixer?

I am new and glad to be a part! I have used Bosch mixers for years - my first 2 lasted 10 years each baking at least two 4 batch loaves of whole wheat bread weekly. I purchased my third which had to be replaced before the 1 yr warranty was up and now only a year later (out of warranty), the bearings are going out and it sounds terrible. I have not even been baking as much as normal! I am ready to jump ship and try something else - suggestions????

Vicious Babushka's picture
Vicious Babushka

It is the best.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I bailed out of my Universal Bosch and into the DLX (Ankarsrum)  a couple of years ago and have NEVER looked back.

(Note at bottom of the page there is a $100.00 off sale on these mixers - only difference is name etched on the ss bowl.)

 

Dina-Marie's picture
Dina-Marie

I appreciate your input! The service dept of LÇhef verified that with the new design, they are having more problems like mine which is too bad because the older version worked great.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Yeah, I just got an Ankarsrum mixer myself and am pretty impressed.  I haven't used a Bosch though, so I can't compare the two.  Mike Avery has a really nice comparison of the two on his site though.

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

I have had an Electrolux DLX Assistent (Ankarsrum) for over a decade.  It was purchased at an estate sale.  I really have no idea how old it is, though when I took it out of the box (not the original box, mind you) it appeared new.  After all that time, and with only a modicum of care, it still looks and act as if I just bought it.  I love it because it is designed so well.  Because it doesn't vibrate much, even under heavy loads of dough, it never "walks" on my counter.  It manages 15 cups of flour.  The design makes it easy to add ingredients while mixing and see into the bowl to check how the mixing's going.  Finally, it mixes all sorts of things other than dough with ease.  I've never used the outside attachments.

I cannot compare it to a Bosch as I've never used one.  I do suggest that you use the search function of this site creatively to find the long strings of comments on the Bosch and DLX devices.  Also, search videos on Youtube and other such sources on these machines and other mixers as the cost of the two are not low.  I was very lucky with my estate sale purchase.    

Dina-Marie's picture
Dina-Marie

Thanks richkaimd and Floydm for your input - it is always nice to hear from satisfied owners and I will use the search function!

Kitchen Barbarian's picture
Kitchen Barbarian

On sale at Pleasant Hill

go WAY down the page, to the blurb where it talks about the Assistent being on sale, then down some more to where the one on sale is listed by itself.  Also there's a drawing for someone to get one for free (eg you would get your money refunded if you won).  Can't beat that.

I hope Bosch gets their stuff together - I have a compact which is plenty for my needs, but it would be a shame if they've messed up the design of those as well as the Universal Plus, or either one, for that matter.  Up to now, the Bosch Compact and the Bosch UP have been the best low and mid-priced mixers for bread making (and many general purpose tasks) on the market.  I would hate to see them go the way of Kitchenaid ...

Melesine's picture
Melesine

Add me to the list of very satisfied DLX/Assistent/Ankarsrum owners. 

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

I had a KA and it broke, did my research and decided I didn't want another. On the advice of a 'net friend from Nova Scotia who had an Ankarsrum Assistent I bought one and love it. You couldn't give me another mixer.

It does so much more than just mix. Check out the attachments. The meat grinder is some sort of fantastic. Ultimately I see our Cuisinart FP going into storage (or sold) as the Assistent takes over it's job. The Cuisinart is a horror show to clean, the Assistent is easy. It also has a grain mill, pasta rollers and an extruder for the meat grinder. So much more. Check it out.

pal251's picture
pal251

I'll take your food processor if you don't want it. Haha

 

I would like to try this assistant but it seems Luke the ka mixes better

Kitchen Barbarian's picture
Kitchen Barbarian

I'm curious - if you've not tried the Ankarsrum/Assistent, then how do you know the KA mixes better?

pal251's picture
pal251

Just going off the food coloring tests I saw on America's test kitchen. If its on TV it must be true :)

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

Yup. I saw that test pal and I had the same misgivings when I was looking at the Ankarsrum. I also knew an owner who assured me that ATK didn't have a clue and assured me of the superiority of it. Clearly, ATK did not have a clue as to how to use the mixer. They used it as though it was a planetary mixer and didn't have an inkling that it should be used differently by the operator. Since they used it incorrectly of course it didn't work. What a surprise, it isn't a planetary mixer and can't be used as though it is. :-) There is a short learning curve and a short time on YouTube will show folks how to use it. Or just asking questions will do the same. I think the arrogance of ATK was responsible for their failure of the Ankarsrum, or they simply didn't want it to work. Yeah, I know they're above that. :-) But they have skin in the game. Look around the kitchen next time. It's loaded with KA mixers that would be expensive to replace, plus they tend to only suggest items that are in popular use. I could give specifics but that would drag this away from the topic. BTW, generally I like ATK, but every once in a while I have to wonder what ails them since I use some of the items they pan, and they are simply no where near reality.

I've had both mixers. The Ankarsrum is by far the better mixer. There is simply no contest; but one must know how to use it. As with any appliance, used incorrectly it won't work right. Those videos are on YouTube also and the folks posting them haven't a clue that they're clueless as to it's operation.

Ashley from Bread Beckers has a 15-16 minute YouTube video that shows the right way to use it. The dough ring, arm adjustment, everything. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMB4CVG5fLs

FWIW, I'm not connected to Bread Beckers in any way. It's simply the best most concise video I know of that shows the right way to use the Ankarsrum.

Neither am I connected to Ankarsrum in any way. So far though I've sold 2 Ankarsrums by my suggestion and both people love their mixers. Both also had KA mixers previously and were as unhappy with them as I was. One runs a camp in the north woods of Canada and told me she was going to bring the KA home to use for the winter and let it stay there. She has changed that plan and is bringing the Anakarsum home to use and leaving the KA at camp so that she doesn't have to use it. She loves the Ankarsrum.

KA got their reputation many years ago when they were made by Hobart. They were extremely expensive machines at the time and Hobart still makes the N50 (?) which is made right. When Whirlpool bought KA they began making them down to a price so that they could sell a gazillion of them and quality now suffers with plastic gears, universal motors, and such. Most folks will never have a problem since most folks own a mixer to make a few cakes now and then, and a loaf of bread twice a year. But for week after week of multiple loaves of bread they typically won't stand up to that. BTW, the Hobart N50 sells for a few thousand dollars. So the one that's made right is still very expensive. But it's only a 7 qt mixer and not a 22 qt mixer.

:-) Trust the owners of the mixer over ATK in this instance, we know the machine, that's why we suggest it. It's not because misery loves company and we want to see others in the same terrible boat we're in. We have no skin in the game though, so buy whatever you want when you buy one. After all, it's your money. After a few months of use it cost me ~$100 to get my KA fixed. I didn't want to rent my mixer, so I got rid of it after doing my research and finding out about the chronic problems.

suave's picture
suave

But they have skin in the game... I could give specifics

By all means, do.

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

The day they produced the show "showing" the superiority of the KA over the Ankarsrum they got skin in the game. Neither design will change much in the next 30 years if the past is an indication, so to all of a sudden decide the Ankarsrum works better would definitely put egg on their faces.

But their initial findings? Look in the background when the show airs, See any mixers? What kind are they? They were using KA long before they tested them. In fact, most American cooks know KA and would look at you with a blank stare if you mentioned Ankarsrum. So they had skin in the game even before the test began. Not many folks want to know they've been had by advertising. Too, one of their advertisers is KA or they used to be if not today. That doesn't lead to an impartial test, or at least it gives the impression of skin in the game. As already mentioned with ATK it's all about $; with the spam sent out, all sorts of ways they generate cash. I'm not decrying that a business should make $, but where will they stop in the generation of profit? When a company accepts $ to advertise a product line it immediately puts any possible testing in doubt.

But assuming their test was done to the best of their ability and cash didn't play a part, to change horses in mid stream now, they'd need to admit something on their part. I can't imaging ATK would ever admit they effed up the test. I'd like to think they would, but I wouldn't place bets on it.

And I actually like the show and subscribe to their magazine.

On a different note, one can generally unsubscribe to all the spam sent out by their advertisers. Scroll all the way down to the bottom of the spam and there should be a link to hit in order to remove ones name from the mailing list. It needs to be done with each advertiser.

Sorry, I'm in a hurry. I hope there aren't too many typos. Gotta run.

suave's picture
suave

Too, one of their advertisers is KA or they used to be if not today. That doesn't lead to an impartial test, or at least it gives the impression of skin in the game. As already mentioned with ATK it's all about $; with the spam sent out, all sorts of ways they generate cash. I'm not decrying that a business should make $, but where will they stop in the generation of profit? When a company accepts $ to advertise a product line it immediately puts any possible testing in doubt.

So, basically, the "specifics" is that when America's Test Kitchen  (and Cook's Illustrated) say that they do not accept advertising they lie.  Did I get that right?

 

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

No you don't have it right. Not by a long shot, and this will be my last post on the subject because clearly you are looking to start a confrontation and that's not why I'm here. I'm here to make better bread and help others. Nice try though! Better luck next time!

ATK is a TV show on PBS, Cooks Illustrated is their magazine. You clearly have them confused. ATK is definitely supported by advertisers and they proudly proclaim their support before and after each show. CI has no advertising. I clearly stated that I saw the show about the mixer. I already posted that I like ATK. Oh, by the way, I also get the CI magazine, so again, nice try.

And uh, basically, that's not all that I wrote, just what you decided you could nit pick.

Again, this is my last post regarding this. Are you a troll? I'm not. Bye!

suave's picture
suave

Their website says: "America's Test Kitchen accepts no advertising."  One of you two has got to be wrong. 

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

Definitely last post on the subject. I told the software not to inform me, yet it did.

Yup, it does say that. That's a web site, I'm sure the site doesn't accept advertising. They don't advertise in the magazine either. I never said they accepted advertising, someone else did to create dissention or because they were confused between ATK and CI. I wrote that ATK gets $ from KA from advertising on their show (ATK being the show). There is a difference. Do they say that they don't take $ from the folks who support them on PBS? Of course not because most folks would see through the subterfuge of semantics.

But anyone watching the show clearly can see that ATK is supported on PBS through the advertising seen before and after the show, they clearly state it, but I'm repeating myself. Then PBS turns around and buys the ATK programming with the $ from the advertising supporters. Their pronouncement of being above it all is hogwash, yet technically they are correct, their hands are lily white since the $ has been laundered by PBS, but if one follows the $ they are being paid by the supporters of the show. KA was one of them at one time. I have no idea if they are now or not. But at one point they were.

I also didn't say they were in the bag (or didn't intend to), only that it gave the possibility of the impression that they could be. Especially since they (IMO) deliberately misused the product they were testing. In this case the Ankarsrum mixer. Either all of us folks who use it on the forum are lying or deluded (a conspiracy of strangers or we all just fell off of the turnip truck) or KA is/was wrong. Frankly I know no one on the forum to be part of such a conspiracy. We could all also be deluded turnips. Which is more likely? ATK having gotten it wrong? Or all of us either in a conspiracy or all of us being independently deluded?

I just set the software to not inform me of replies yet again. Even if it does inform me, no more replies from me.

Kitchen Barbarian's picture
Kitchen Barbarian

I've gotten tired of ATK - especially after I made the mistake of subscribing to their website, which unleashed a brick-load of spam upon me.  No amount of "unsubscribing" would stop the continual harassment - I finally just set up a filter to consign anything from CI/ATK/whatsisname to the fiery pits of auto-delete.  It was a relief when that subscription finally expired. 

I can't figure out what they are basing their product reviews on - it appears to be totally arbitrary (pretty much like their "perfect" recipes, which they keep changing every couple of  years - apparently "perfection" has a fairly short shelf-life). 

Having been burned about as often as I end up happy, I no longer pay any attention to their product reviews, either.  I'd love to know where some of these off-the-wall decisions are actually coming from ... do tell ...

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

Being a pal I'm sure you would pal251 :-) . Thanks for the offer, but I just couldn't do that to a pal.

If I knew then what I know now I never would have bought the Cuisinart. But it was part of the learning process that got me to this point. A fancy name and reputation doesn't do it for me, the appliance must do something of value or it's off my countertop. It will work for a lot of folks, just not for me. It will serve little or no purpose in my kitchen once I get the Ankarsrum FP and a mandolin for thin cuts.

SCChris's picture
SCChris

In the YouTube the dough hook is discarded during the dough mixing and kneeding?

 

Chris

 

Vicious Babushka's picture
Vicious Babushka

The Assistent comes with two dough hooks. The small hook (which actually looks like a short club) is used for soft doughs and small batches. The larger hook, which is an actual hook, is used for stiff doughs and large batches. I don't know which video you are referring to, since there are many videos on YouTube demonstrating all the Assistent features.

SCChris's picture
SCChris

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMB4CVG5fLs

Thanks ViciousBabushka..  I Knead to review a few more..

 

Chris

 

 

 

Grampa Knuckles's picture
Grampa Knuckles

Lots of talk about the Ankarsrum and I couldn't agree more, they ooze quality. Plus they are not as difficult as some think.  Works great large or small batch thanks to 2 bowls that come with it.  the dough hook is so heavy duty it could almost be classed as a weapon.  This site shows a few good videos and lots of information www.ankarsrum.ca 

 

AnneL's picture
AnneL

Hello, I am new to this forum and just read about the choice for mixer. I own a KA 5.5 and have discovered its limit when it come to making dough on a regular basis. So I am looking to replace it. After several weeks of research, for the price I am able to pay, no commercial machine would be an option, especially since it is to be used at home! 

During my research I talked to a few different kitchen appliance specialists and all of them told me the horse power is the king when it come to dough mixing. This is why commercial mixer aren't for homes: the lack of high HP limits them to mixing soft batter (a small mixer - for example the 12 qt Hobart is 1/5 HP). I was told they are not made to mix dough (Only the big ones - 80qt are appropriate for dough)!!

On a contrary, according to what they all told me, the KA Proline, with his 1.3HP, is supposed to be a killer when it come to bread making. It is also sold for commercial use under the name of KA Commercial with NSF certification (but it is them more expensive, and has only 2 years warranty vs 5 for the Proline).

Is there anybody on this forum who has experience with the KA Proline (or the Commercial)? Does anybody know if the Ankarsrum may have found a new competitor with the KA Proline? I need to get a new mixer before my 5.5 KA stops working but I can't make up my mind between the 2? I would love to hear about your opinion and recommendations :)

Thank you all!

Anne.

Kitchen Barbarian's picture
Kitchen Barbarian

Anne, its not the total HP reported by the manufacturer that matters - it's watts delivered.  There is power loss in the motor so the power delivered is not the same as total power available at the motor.  But there is more to it than even that - the type of drive also matters, and how the mixer is configured.  Is it planetary, belt drive, direct drive, etc etc etc.  What is the power transfer ratio.  Delivered torque.  Kneading action.  You can't say that one of these features is better than the rest because it is the entire configuration that matters - so in some cases a belt drive may be "best" because of the way the mixer is built, but in another case a planetary drive might be "best" because of other features.  It has to be evaluated in whole, not in part - so you can't say that "HP is king".  It isn't.

For the money, I would not recommend ANY currently manufactured KA mixer, and for the home baker I would recommend one of the following:

$200 - Bosch Compact - good general purpose and bread mixer for low output bakers - handles 6 lbs of dough (2 to 3 loaves per batch).  Weighs around 5-6 lbs with poly bowl

$400 - Bosch Universal Pro - larger capacity than above, up to approx. 8 loaves (15 lbs of dough) per batch.  Some people report poor results with small batches.  However there are a couple of attachments - one very cheap, a dough creep guard, and one fairly expensive, the food processor bowl - that are supposed to handle small amounts of dough better.  However if you routinely make smaller amounts the Compact is probably the better machine for you.  Weighs around 10-11 lbs with poly bowl

$700 (currently you can get new mixers that are still marked Assistent from Pleasant Hill Grain for $100 off, or $600) - Ankarsrum - formerly DLX/Electrolux/Verona - comes with metal bowl (Bosches come with poly bowl, the metal bowl is $100 - $130 extra) and a poly bowl.  Also handles up to 15 lbs of dough.  Most people who have used both this and the Bosch Universal feel that the Ankarsrum handles large batches of dough better.  I don't have any information on how it handles small batches.  Weighs around 19 lbs with metal bowl

You can buy various accessories (such as blenders, food processors, grinders, etc) for all 3 of the above mixers.

Any of the 3 above mixers beat out any KA mixer currently made.  These are, IMO, the three best mixers on the market for the home bread baker. 

I got the compact because I never bake more than one loaf at a time, and I wanted a mixer that would be good for general purpose use as well as making bread.  I wanted a smaller capacity mixer because I bake smaller amounts these days as neither my son nor I have much of a sweet tooth - so I'll make a 2 layer 6" cake instead of a 2 layer 9" cake these days (which is about half or less the batter).  The Compact is really not a small mixer, but it handles the smaller amounts I need it to handle.  My old KA S5 was hopeless for small amounts.  And it weighed too dang much - my Bosch Compact weighs about 5 or 6 lbs, compared to 28 lbs for the old KA.

 

AnneL's picture
AnneL

What you say makes so much sense! Thank you! 

I watch the video from Ashley at Bread Becker showing how to use the machine (as recommended by BBQinMaine) and she says to not use the dough hook. I read in another website on bread making about the action of the dough hook and am wondering if using the roller in the Ankarsrum  will not affect the development of the gluten and the quality of the bread compared to using a KA with dough hook instead: here is a copy/paste from bbag.com:

"Once the gluten has been formed, the mechanical movement of the dough hook will work the gluten into an organized structure. If one looks carefully at the mixer’s hook working in dough, two distinct movements can be observed. The first part of the movement stretches the chains of gluten and the second part folds the chains of gluten over onto themselves."

I am new in bread making so for me anything I am doing is kind of a discovery :) I assure you I greatly appreciate your reply: I am now leaning more towards the Ankarsrum :) in a way it seems like a no brainer when you read all the great reviews and everything that has been said about it on this website, I was just unsure about the HP which you have answered so clearly! Thank you again very much!!

Kitchen Barbarian's picture
Kitchen Barbarian

Ummmm, what is bbag.com?  My anti-virus program blocks it, LOL!

I don't own an Ankarsrum but it is my understanding that the roller action has a similar action to hand kneading.

I don't think I buy the idea that you should never use the dough hook, and I think that maybe most of the problems people have adjusting to using the Ankarsrum probably arise from either always trying to use the roller or always trying to use the dough hook, and/or from using them improperly. For instance, by not adjusting the position of the roller properly you'll get a poor kneading action.  I think breadbecker's may be wrong in stating that one should never use the dough hook - notice that in that video she states the max amount of dough she has ever worked with is 8 lbs, or about half the capacity of the machine.  I'm not sure she actually says never to use it; just that she hasn't found it necessary (which may be true if she doesn't make large quantities of stiff doughs).  I can't really remember exactly what she says, but regardless, I think there are times when you would want to use the dough hook instead of the roller, and v-v.

It's my understanding - and someone who actually owns the machine could perhaps speak more authoritatively on the matter - that when making smaller amounts, slack doughs, high hydrations doughs, soft doughs - the roller is the preferred tool.  But when making larger amounts or very stiff doughs or lower hydrations doughs, the dough hook is the better choice.  I've seen it suggested that you should use the roller to incorporate, but the dough hook to knead.  I think a bit of experimentation is probably required - and this is probably the area the Ankarsrum is weakest in, is in providing the information to non-EU users as to the proper and most efficient ways to use the machine.

Also you may want to get advice from owners re the usefulness of the mixer for smaller quantities - I think I've seen a demo on youtube where the guy said he was kneading " a pound" of bagel dough - but looking at the quantity I wonder if he didn't mean it was a pound of flour, which would of course be more than a pound of dough once you add the preferment etc.  It wasn't a huge glob of dough though and it seemed to be handling it fine; but I'm not sure how smaller amounts of batter and cookie dough would be handled - apparently you have to use the plastic bowl to use the cookie paddles and the whips.  Which is kind of odd.  Apparently they sit on a shaft that fits into the base of the machine and comes up through the center of the bowl, more like the Bosch UP.

AnneL's picture
AnneL

Thank you Barbarian, I believe I need to do a lot more research and talk to Ankarsrum owners like you recommended. 

I am sorry if I said it wrong, Ashley didn't say to never use the hook, just that for their bread recipe the hook isn't working well as the dough is too soft. Like I said, I am brand new in bread making and have a lot to learn! 

You said you got the compact because you don't make more than one loaf at a time, may I ask you what size your loaf is? Also, what is the biggest dough you can make with the compact? Right now I make 2 pounds loaves, and sometimes I double it. 

Thank you again so much for your help.

Anne.

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

I have and use both of these mixers.  I purchased my DLX after deciding that my KA wasn't quite large enough for the kind of mixing I needed done.  My KA is quite old, has had some minor tune-ups of the years and is still good for a single 1.5 lb loaf, but has always been a pain for anything larger.  Unlike the newer models, it doesn't quit when it gets hot.  I have had that happen when teaching bread baking on newer models in other kitchens.  It's a real nuisance.

I have had my DLX for over a dozen years.  I have NOTHING BAD TO SAY ABOUT IT.  In my 40 years of bread baking I have made dough with only a bowl and hands and lots of machines.  I find nothing different about the doughs I make only with my hands and those I make with the KA or the DLX.  I find no difference between doughs made with the DLX roller or with its dough hook.  I also use the DLX for anything I might use my KA or my hand-held mixer for except that with the DLX I can make small to much large amounts.

Besides the amount of dough difference between the KA and the DLX there's also the extreme ease in adding ingredients to the DLX compared to any KA.  In addition, its nice that, in all the time I've used the DLX, it has never "walked" on my countertop.  With larger amounts of dough, my KA rattled and shook enough that I could never walk away from it.  Never happens with my DLX, ever.

 

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

I have and use both of these mixers.  I purchased my DLX after deciding that my KA wasn't quite large enough for the kind of mixing I needed done.  My KA is quite old, has had some minor tune-ups of the years and is still good for a single 1.5 lb loaf, but has always been a pain for anything larger.  Unlike the newer models, it doesn't quit when it gets hot.  I have had that happen when teaching bread baking on newer models in other kitchens.  It's a real nuisance.

I have had my DLX for over a dozen years.  I have NOTHING BAD TO SAY ABOUT IT.  In my 40 years of bread baking I have made dough with only a bowl and hands and lots of machines.  I find nothing different about the doughs I make only with my hands and those I make with the KA or the DLX.  I find no difference between doughs made with the DLX roller or with its dough hook.  I also use the DLX for anything I might use my KA or my hand-held mixer for except that with the DLX I can make small to much large amounts.

Besides the amount of dough difference between the KA and the DLX there's also the extreme ease in adding ingredients to the DLX compared to any KA.  In addition, its nice that, in all the time I've used the DLX, it has never "walked" on my countertop.  With larger amounts of dough, my KA rattled and shook enough that I could never walk away from it.  Never happens with my DLX, ever.

 

AnneL's picture
AnneL

Your answer is answering almost all of the question I had!! Yay :-) 

I have one more question though :-)

When it come the the size of the loaf, with your experience with both machine, what would you recommend for someone who makes 2lb loaves on a regular basis? Does the DLX work well on small size dough like that? I also make bigger batches but not as often (probably because I am still in the beginner's learning stage! "wink")

I totally agree on the "walking" on the counter with the KA, I never leave it alone. Also, I like the timer with the DLX which is something that even the new KA models don't have. My heart wants to buy the DLX, but before I make this decision I want to make sure small doughs are well handled :-)

Thank you again so much for your reply, so helpful!

Anne.

Grampa Knuckles's picture
Grampa Knuckles

Roller is my fave.

Grampa Knuckles's picture
Grampa Knuckles

I use both the roller and the hook but admit to mainly the roller/scraper.  The only time I use the hook is for heavy artisan breads and bagels.  Also find perogy dough does nicely with hook.

For whoever asked about small batches I've had my Ankarsrum (Assistant in my case) for years and when deciding on which bowl usually if I have more than 4 cups of dry ingredients I find that the Roller and Scraper give nicer results than the Plastic bowl with cookie whips.  Seems to incorporate so much air, the most delish Shortbread cookies can be made with the roller and scraper.  One place the Roller causes trouble though is with cold butter but I seen on the Canadian Ankarsrum site (ankarsrum.ca)  in the Blog somewhere they mention to grate the butter first and then it works excellent. Its the only mixer I use, for small, large, liquid or otherwise.  I no longer own any mixer stand or hand.

 

AnneL's picture
AnneL

This is my first time using a forum and I have to admit my husband was correct: forums are great!

You have all taught me something, given me awesome info, recommendation and advise I am genuinely thankful!

Hopefully someone will be able to answer my last question on the minimum size dough for the Ankarsrum :-) The smallest size dough I make on a regular basis in 2 Lb (or 4 cups of flour), and my fear is that the Ankarsrum requires bigger batches to benefit its full potential!

Grampa Knuckles's picture
Grampa Knuckles

I use batches this small occasionally. You may find especially with a stiff batter that it will not form the "doughnut" as with larger batches but it still kneads them nicely.

Kitchen Barbarian's picture
Kitchen Barbarian

for 2lb loaves I KNOW the Bosch Compact will suit that purpose.  I can't say about the Ankarsrum, so far one person says "yes" and I did see that one video on youtube with the "1 lb" of bagel dough - which did form a doughnut, but I'm pretty sure it was actually a bit more than 1 lb of dough.  Check out the videos on youtube.

One thing about the Bosch Compact is that the overhead mixing arm tends to jump around a bit when you are kneading a heavy dough.  It's a little annoying but really doesn't seem to have any effect on the dough.  The max capacity is 6 lbs - if you are mainly making one or two loaves at a time you will be well within its parameters.

For me, the Compact was the best choice, because I KNOW I will never ever exceed its capacity, it's small and lightweight and easy for me to schlepp around.  It's also less than a third of the cost of the Ankarsrum. However (no disrespect to the Bosch Compact) the Ankarsrum IS better constructed.  It does come with the stainless steel bowl, which will cost you another $60 for the Bosch Compact (if you buy from the German Amazon website, not sure about additional shipping charges) or about $125 if you buy it from a US distributer. 

Yeah, its the exact same bowl, don't ask me about the markup, LOL!  In fact the Bosch Compact itself is about $80 plus its a 500W motor instead of the 400W motor we get, LOL!  Unfortunately the EU version has different electrical requirements so you can't plug it into the wall over here, afraid we're stuck paying 2.5 times as much for our version of the electrical appliance itself, but all the attachments can be had much cheaper if you buy them in the EU.

Anyway, even if you go out and buy the stainless steel bowl separately, it is still less than half the cost of the Ankarsrum to get the Compact.

Also, it's not just small amounts of bread dough you may need to be concerned about, but also how the Ankarsrum handles tasks like whipping egg whites and making cookie dough or cake batters, and if it will handle small amounts for those tasks.

I'm not down-talking the Ankarsrum at all; I just don't know the answers to those questions, nor even how important those issues are to you.  I wanted a general purpose, small mixer - but maybe you are looking for something solely for use making bread dough.  If that's the case then it doesn't matter how the Ankarsrum handles other tasks, LOL!  It boils down to your ultimate use and whether or not you can afford the increased expense.

AnneL's picture
AnneL

Barbarian, thank you for these precious details. I am not sure what to get. All I know is that I have an almost 10 year old KitchenAid which gears have already been changed because I have used it to make dough! As I don't want to kill it (I like my KA!! LOL) since I can find many more task besides making dough, I guess I truly am looking for something specifically for dough. I saved enough to get the Ankersrum, but that doesn't mean I have to buy it (I could always use the left over to buy my wheat grain instead!! hehehe).

All I want is a machine that does the job and that is strong enough to deal with dough and won't either overheat and stop like my KA, or which motor or gears will wear out so much from this use I would have to change them every 4 months!

Thank you Grampa Knuckles for the info on the 4 cups. I haven't tried any other recipe for bread besides the one I learned 4 months ago which I believe can be classified as medium soft (not soft but not hard as pizza or bagel dough!). 

I will continue my research and hopefully when I am meant to find The mixer, it'll pop up right at me :-)

Thank you all so much for all your help and for teaching so much about these mixers. 

Anne.