The Fresh Loaf

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High fibre low GI loaf

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hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

High fibre low GI loaf

I have been asked by a diabetic friend to produce a high fibre low GI loaf Does anyone have an ide for a recipe? I have looked online for suggestions but each has its critics and the large supermarkets offerings are not great

 

thanks

 

Ian

Heath's picture
Heath

Sourdough bread, even white, is known to have a lower GI than bread made with commercial yeast - the effect lasting hours after eating.  Here's a link to some research:-

http://www.uoguelph.ca/news/2008/07/sourdough_bread.html

If you've never made sourdough, here's a link to an easy method of creating a wild yeast starter that I recently had success with:-

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/10856/pineapple-juice-solution-part-1

The post is in two parts and contains a long explanation of the method.  The instructions for making the starter are at the bottom of the second part.

I started with the following easy sourdough recipe:-

http://www.sourdoughhome.com/index.php?content=sourdoughfastrack5

It only contains 15% whole wheat, but as I became more proficient I upped the whole grain flour content and added seeds.  I also let it go through two rises.

If you use the search box in the top right-hand corner, you'll find plenty of low GI and high fibre recipes.

Heath's picture
Heath

Well, don't I feel stupid...reading further down the thread you're obviously a seasoned sourdough baker.

Maybe my post will be useful to any newbies reading :(

hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

I think I describe myself as an enthusiastic amateur. All I have learnt has been gained from the good people here on this forum, I have bought books recommended here  When I started I didn't like sourdough but now I am coming round to it (providing I put enough goodies in it) A lot of bakers terms I don't fully understand but I am lucky I can follow instructions and things turn out OK. I get a kick out of sharing the fruits of my labours with others as they seem to like what I make, and bread making is very therapeutic. So when someone asked for a type of loaf I'll do my best to make it for them and your post was very informative and easy to follow.

thanks

Ian  

Heath's picture
Heath

Thanks Ian :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of 25 and 100% whole grain mutigrain bread is 51 (but can be as low as 40 and as high as 62 depending on the grain used , white bread is 73 (plus or minus 2).  As a general rule the higher the fiber the lower the GI but nothing beats barley.  Here is a list from here http://www.the-gi-diet.org/lowgifoods/  Whole wheat and SD rye are pretty low but I'm guessing that a multigrain SD with barley in it  would be a good start,   SD breads are naturally lower on the GI index.  I bake a lot of SD whole grain breads because I to too suffer from this disease  Stay far away from bagels, French breads and baguettes but a SD whole multigrain bagel is not bad.

Low GI 
Soya and Linseed36
Wholegrain Pumpernickel46
Heavy Mixed Grain45
Whole Wheat49
Sourdough Rye48
Sourdough Wheat54
Medium GI 
Croissant67
Hamburger bun61
Pita, white57
Wholemeal Rye62
High GI 
White71
Bagel72
French Baguette95
hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

I am making a lot of SD Khorasan wholemeal loaves 20/80 with Canadian white adding 20% five grains. If I change the flour percentage to 50/50 would that make an acceptable loaf, perhaps change the 5 grains to Golden linseed (or doesn't it matter with whole grains?)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

an acceptable loaf? I routinely bake a 100% whole grain, home ground, multigrain SD that is 20% each; barley, Kamut (Khorasan), rye, spelt, WW, and a little VWG (20 g per 750 g loaf)  to get to rise properly.

I  also like to add Flax seed (lindseed) and sesame seeds to the mix at 6% of the total weight but I grind them together into a meal as flax seeds have a very hard sheell and ,when un-ground, they just pass though the body unchanged and their nutritive properties go completely unused and to waste - literally.

Home ground fours are thirsty and 90% hydration seems to work well.with a 4 hour autolyse for the whole grains to soften them up.   I also do a 75% extraction to sift out the hard bits and use them to feed the SD levain, intsead of the whole flour, which gets them wettest the longest and less likely to cut gluten strands.  I use 1.75% salt.

Any whole grain combination of these grains works and, if use the pumpernickel method of low and slow baking, the bread will even be lower on the GI index.  But some folks don't like pumpernickel.

Hope this helps.

hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

Sorry, a funny term to be sure in this case its a loaf someone else will like not just me. (I have made a few of those, raved about them where others haven't seen what the fuss is all about) Unfortunately I don't mill my own grains yet. but give me time

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

where I put some low GI Ezekiel bread stuff in as a soaker and farro in this case was Einkorn.   Nuts are also great for folks with diabetes so they work well as an add in

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/34169/whole-multigrain-sourdough-loaf

You don't have to mill your own flour.  Just use some whole Kamut, WW and whole rye or other whole grain flour.  All are easily sourced from someplace local to you. if you don't live in the boonies.  It turns out that low GI bread is about the best tasting and most healthy bread on the planet

I happen to be rumming a test on SD and Yeast water starters this week and am using  25% each whole; Kamut, rye, wheat and spelt for the test bake.  A perfect diabetic bread.  Will post it on Friday.