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Hanseata Multigrain SD YW and Sunflower Seed Challenge Bread

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Hanseata Multigrain SD YW and Sunflower Seed Challenge Bread

We love challenges of all kinds and bread baking ones are no exception.  Anything, within reason, that one can do to learn something new, stretch limited understanding, gain new skills while having some fun at the same time, sounds good to my apprentice.

 

Top left are rolled oats, top right aresteel cut oats, bottom are whole oat groats.

Hanseata’s Challenge; of a tinned multigrain bead with sunflower seeds, was a great way to see what grains were hidden away in Lucy’s secret pantry.  I knew she didn’t have rolled spelt and barley or chestnut flour which proves even deep pantried, German baking apprentices have ingredient shortages like everyone else.

 

Look how chunky the autolyse ended up - even before the oat groat scald and sunflower seeds were added!

We went looking all over town for chestnut flour because we knew that we would never spend $10 a pound delivered for it over the Internet.  But the Chinese and Indian market came up wanting.   There are no Italian markets to be found around Gilbert, AZ either.

  

The fix was easy enough for Lucy, she just ground up a mix of Brazil, pecan, almond, walnuts and pistachio nuts as a replacement.  She subbed medium grind whole spelt for the rolled variety and subbed medium ground bulgar for the rolled barley.

 

Lucy couldn’t be outdone by a German baker she had never met, so she added some ground sesame seeds to the ground flax, some scalded whole oat groats, Toadies of course, and some left over prune water from the last bake.  She also decided to sub yeast water for the commercial yeast specified and use a bit of lard, 5 g for the fat instead of shortening.

 

Fill the pan half full adn let it sise in the middle to the rim of the pan and it starts to crack on top.  We didnlt dock.

What we wanted to make sure of is that we followed the list in order of weight and to use or limited knowledge of these kinds of breads to work out a formula that would make some sense to the woefully uniformed and totally lost like my apprentice and I.

 

We used all the whole spelt in the recipe for the levain and all of the liquid for it after the first stage build was YW.  The 3 stages were 4 hours each where the levain tripled at the end of the 3rd stage.  At that point we added the 10 g of whole rye to it, technically making a 4th stage and immediately retarded it in the fridge for 24 hours.  The levain ended up being almost 12% of the total weight but it was very active.

  

It is amazing how bread can become..................................Eggplant lasagna in the blink of an eye!

The levain rose 50% in the fridge and finished doubling in 2 hours on the counter the next morning while everything else but the salt, which was sprinkled on top, the huge amount of sunflower seeds and the oat groat scald was autolysing.  Normally we would do a minimum 4 hour autolyse for whole grains like this but we used 2 hours this time hoping for the best.

 

The whole grains came in at 85 % because the white whole wheat isn’t whole wheat at all.  The Toadies were note included in the whole grain calculation even though they are  the toasted; sifted out middling, bran and wheat germ that, when added back into the mix, makes up for 4 times as much weight as the toadies as whole grain.  By taking toadies into account, the whole grains would be 95%.

 

Once the autolyse and levain met up we did 6minutes of slap and folds to get the gluten going.  After a 10 minute rest we did another 4 minutes of slap and folds.  After another 10 minute rest, we did 2 minutes of slap and folds and then let the dough rest 15 minutes.  We then did 3 sets of S&F’s on 15 mine intervals where incorporated the sunflower seeds on the first on and the oat groat scald on the 2nd set.

 

A 30 minute bulk ferment followed the 3rd set of S&F’s before the dough was divided into (2) 500g pieces and shaped into batards to ft the cocktail loaf pans.  The tinned dough was allowed to proof on the counter before being retarded in the fridge for 24 hours.

 

The dough had doubled in the fridge and showed some cracks on top, a sure sign the dough was ready to be baked off.  We allowed the dough to come to room temperature over 1 1/2 hours on the counter.  The mini oven was fired up to 450 F and (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups were placed inside after being heated to boiling in the micro wave.

 

The tinned bread was steamed at 450 F for 5 minutes and then the mini was turned down to 425 F for another 5 minutes.  The steam was then removed and the mini turned down to 375 F, convection this time.  The loaves continued to bake for another 10 minutes as we rotated the tins every 5 minutes.  At that point, we de-tinned the bread and continued to bake it for another 10 minutes.

 

When the bread hit 201 F we turned off the mini oven but let the bread stay in the mini oven until it hit 204 F when we removed it to a cooling rack.  Because of the low temperatures, we didn’t get the bold bake, spring or blisters of our other mini oven bakes but the bread did brown up to a medium brown and was very crunchy coming out of the oven,  All of these characteristics are nearly identical to our other bakes  of similar breads.

 

Lat night's dinner salad of kale, red leaf and romaine lettuce with nappa cabbage and feta cheese.  All the usual fixings too!

We also didn’t get the huge lengthwise split down the side of the loaf of the sample in Karin’s post and don’t know what we could have done to achieve that artistic baking flair of the original.  This bread smells great, even though there aren’t any aromatic seeds in it.

 

I think aromatic seeds would have been a fine addition and can’t believe my apprentice didn’t throw them in - even after I had Mini Oven’s seed mélange toasted and ready to go in this bread.  The Queen of Seeds, quite rightly, will be very disappointed in Lucy I’m sure - just like I am for this glaring omission.

 

A beautiful stuffed chicken breast with a tasty wine and butter suace.

This bake finished at noon yesterday and the loaves were wrapped when cooled to let the moisture redistribute. This morning the crust has gone soft, a good sign and we will cut it at the 24 hour mark to give it a taste.  Cutting is over and the bread is about the nuttiest and seediest bread Lucy has ever concocted and more than the example.  The dough more than doubled and the crumb is soft, moist and open.  There is purple tinge to the crumb from the walnuts no doubt.  It is delicious but not as dark as the original.

Very delicious indeed - unreal toasted.  I got some pate out of the freezer I was saving for a bread like this one and plan to add a variety of cheeses, fruits, and veggies to go with the pate and this fine bread for lunch.  Yummy!

Thanks Karin for the idea of this challenge bake!   So much fun and tasty to boot ...... even though it ended up not very close to the original example.

Sunbursts right before sunset on retard day.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD & YW  Starter

4

0

0

4

1.05%

Whole Rye

0

0

10

10

2.62%

Yeast Water

0

16

25

41

10.73%

Whole Spelt

11

16

25

52

13.61%

Water

11

0

0

11

2.88%

Total

26

32

60

118

20.16%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain and YW Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

64

16.75%

 

 

 

Water

54

14.14%

 

 

 

Hydration

84.38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

11.91%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

White Whole Wheat

60

15.71%

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

20

5.24%

 

 

 

Whole Farro - Einkorn

63

16.49%

 

 

 

Whole Barley Meal

18

4.71%

 

 

 

Whole Rye

130

34.03%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

7

1.83%

 

 

 

Strel Cut Oats

9

2.36%

 

 

 

Whole Bulgar

11

2.88%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

318

83.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt 1, Sea Salt 7

8

2.09%

 

 

 

Water

287

75.13%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

90.25%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

382

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

341

89.27%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

89.27%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

85.86%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

86.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

991

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

3.93%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

10

2.62%

 

 

 

Almonds, Pistachio, Walnut, Pecan, Brazil

44

11.52%

 

 

 

Sunflower Seeds

128

33.51%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

2.62%

 

 

 

Barley Malt Syrup

18

4.71%

 

 

 

Lard

5

1.31%

 

 

 

Total

230

60.21%

 

 

 

 

Lunch on retard day. 

Comments

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

would have to come to agreement about what great bread this is--could become as famous as the Potsdam conference! And if not, at least they would have several lovely meals with a unique and wholesome bread as the centerpiece. Your pictues of the bread and of all that accompanys it are gorgeous. Great work! My assistant is drooling on the keyboard while trying to lick the monitor. Have to put her back to work cleaning the kitchen after this morning's marathon soft molasses cookie bake.Three dozen each delivered to three households with more to spare for her afternoon tea. She insists on making them without so much as an added raisin or any oatmeal. Must be an old family recipe that she refuses to alter.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

are going to like this challenge as much as any in the ITJB series. You will have more fun than anyone baking this with your sisters,  Can't wait to see how each of take this challenge on and make it your own.

I'm so glad you like the post.  It is a special bread for sure and deserves a special lunch like the one today.  I though I was in Potsdam sitting by a slow flowing river with a glass of Riesling munch away on this bread with several cheese and fruits......but instead.....  it was too hot to even sit by the pool to eat lunch - another 105 F day in a whole series this week.

I'm guessing your apprentice was really drooling over that huge batch of molasses cookies :-)  They sound delish and I could use a dozen right now and Lucy could eat a few too - and she just had dinner!

Thanks for the kind words Barbara! Enjoy the weekend and

Happy Challenge Baking with your sisters.    

Skibum's picture
Skibum

. . . impressive and complex bake!  With all of those goodies in there it must taste amazing.  You also have seemed to hit most of the ingredients of the original, so well done!

I most appreciate the coaching  and the photos showing dough development and want to thank you for persuading me to try this challenge! Well after 8 hours in the fridge, the most ambitious and first ever 100% whole grain bread is beginning to look like a loaf:

I will definitely leave this until the morning to bake and am actually quite excited about seeing and tasting the results.

Question for the whole grain experts on the board, do you wrap a loaf like this in linen for a day of so after it has cooled before slicing.  I seem to remember this practice with some dense loaves but my memory fails me.

Happy baking!  Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to make?  Yours looks even more wet than mine was:-)  You can retard it quite a while of need be and let it proof totally in the fridge too or bring it out and let it warm up on the counter and finish proofing there.  Just watch for the cracks and the middle getting to top of the rim before baking.

You will love this bread.  Just another bread baking milestone heading your way.  i'm glad you tried it out ...and so successfully so far....no worries!

I wrap up pumpernickel breads (another one you have to try some day) in cotton for 32 - 40 hours before slicing.  They usually are 100% hydration and more wet too.   Since this was just a whole grain 30% rye at 86% hydration I just let it cool , wrapped it in plastic wrap and let it sit for 24 hours.  Turned out great.  The crust got soft and it was very easy to cut 1/4" slices even with all the add ins.  I don't think this bread requires cotton wrapping - just a little time to redistribute the moisture.

Glad you joined Karin's challenge Ski and that you like the post as well.

Happy baking Ski

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Whoa, that's loaded! Lots of good, nutritious stuff!

I, too, would take up Karin's challenge but, sadly to say, there's no way I'd be able to get half of the ingredients without costing me an arm and a leg. Best thing I can do is watch others attempt it, learn from their posts, and hopefully do something similar in the distant future.

Thanks for posting, Dab. They always contain nuggets of valuable information.

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread Zita.  It was a fun bake and wonderful challenge.  Cambodia isn't the best place to source bread ingredients for sure.  Love your new web site too!

Happy baking 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Although different, I'm sure that yours was every bit as good as the one that Karin pictured.

From looking at the ingredient list Karin shared, I figured the rye flour would come in at about 75-85%, with the remainder of the grains bringing the bill up to 100%.  That means most of them wouldn't be but 1-2%.  Seeds, of course, would be extra.  I wonder if the original was baked very long and slow in a steamy environment to get that dark color.

No matter.  You achieved a marvelous bread on your own terms.

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

but then the stuff didn't add up right once you started looking at the details,  If it that that much rye then it would have been called a rye bread not a multigrain and if it was that high in rye  why have VWG at all?  The salt had to add up to 2% but they split it up into to different kinds.  I figured the least amount of starter they would have would be 12% of the total and the starter was a whole spelt one - not rye.  Why would they use a spelt starter and feed it rye for the levain that had to have somewhere around 50 g of some kind of flour in it?   I'm guessing they fed it spelt since it was't a rye bread.  Other hints - who would put less than 10 g of fax seeds in a bread or less than 15 g of Barley malt syrup and 15 g of VWG in a bread?  All the various grains had to be more than that since these other items were further down the list than all the grains. 

I'm thinking your hunch that the loaf was baked pumpernickel style is the answer for the dark color low and slow or the chestnuts do that?  Here is the % spreadsheet I used to try and figure it out.  It was a fun problem..

Challenge Bread    
  Total Half 
 GramsFlour%recipe
Rye meal26084730.70%130
Water 155, Prune water 133, Yeast water 5268084780.28%340
Sunflower seeds25684730.22%128
Ancient wheat meal: einkorn for this one12684714.88%63
Wheat flour - Subbed white whole wheat12084714.17%60
Rolled spelt - subbed medium spelt meal levian9084710.63%45
Sub almond, pistachio, walnut, brazil, pecan8884710.39%44
Whole Oats  - Scald and Soak608477.08%30
Rolled oats408474.72%20
Barley meal368474.25%18
Barley malt extract368474.25%18
Vital wheat gluten268473.07%14
Rolled barley - subbed mediun bulgar flour228472.60%11
Ground Flax & Sesame Seed208472.36%10
Toadies208472.36%10
Steel cut oats188472.13%9
Spelt flour - levain168471.89%8
Potato flakes148471.65%7
Sea salt148471.65%7
Vegetable fat (shortening)108471.18%5
Whole spelt sourdough88470.94%4
Table salt28470.24%1
Yeast08470.00%0
 1962 231.64%982

I could have had more rye but it wouldn't have made the bread darker unless it was baked low and slow.  Glad you liked the bread.  You are right it turned out fine all on its own even though it didn't turn out as dark as it should have but Lucy want to pumpernickel everything so .....

Happy baking Paul.

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks like a terrific interpretation of the challenge.  That bread is chock full of goodness and you and Lucy should be very proud.  If Max would put down one of his squeaky toys to look at Lucy's creation he would give it the 2 paw salute!

I hope to be able to attempt a version some time early this week.  Right now I'm about to bake my agent orange surprise bread and I'm working on a Semolina bread to bring to our friends house for football Sunday.  My wife is making some eggplant parmesan along with her home made sauce....could use some of that fantastic looking eggplant Lasagna and amazing stuffed chicken breast on Sunday!

Regards,
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Ian.  You wil  like the mix anad dump aspects of this bread.Can't wait to see your version.  The lasagna, like most Italian food is better the next day.  I usually make DaBrownman's Stuffed Chicken Supreeze on the grill but decided to do it inside on the stove top for browning and then a larger splash of wine and a little butter to make the automatic sauce in the mini oven as it  finishes itself off - then a little fresh rosemary.

One of my favorites.  this one had smoked Gouda, Swiss chard, caramelized onions, mushrooms and hot peppers with some hot Italian sausage for the filling.  Normally would have some home smoked bacon int here in place of the Italian sausage but the sausage was good too.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

You have certainly outdone yourself, DBM, and Lucy must be a good mathematician to come up with these deep thoughts on reasonable ratios.

Your bread is definitely on par with the original - if not better. A pity you can't airlift a slice!

Great post, as usual, and big hug,

Karin

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy and I had a wonderful time with this baking challenge and the bread that resulted was the real treat.   We rarely ever bake a recipe as it is spelled out it seems so, we like to mess with them even if we know what they are to begin with :-). This one was no exception and Lucy has been forever ruined by the Queen of Seeds penchant for putting them in bread - a good thing. 

Some things I noticed about the end result.  I need to find a thinner, taller, longer cocktail loaf pan.  The white bits in the crumb  we not replicated by the pumpkin seeds or the  whole wheat scald which came out a darker color when baked.  Could they be chopped chestnuts?  We probably put too many pumpkin seeds in the mix but there is no stopping Lucy when it comes to seeds in bread and the result is a bread that is just more seedy - not a bad thing.

I think the dark color comes for a pumpernickel baking process even though it wasn't touted as such,  I could get there with the higher temps and shorter times with a dark stout, cocoa and coffee and will do so next time but, since they weren't listed, it must be low and slow covered baking?  i would up the hydration some for that too.

Thanks for the challenge bake idea!  We loved it and am glad it turned  well.  Lucy sends a kiss, she loves kisses, to a fellow German baker and a hug to you from her master. 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I'm not 100% sure whether they would really list any secret "enhancement" they might have added. Of course, they might have baked the loaf a la pumpernickel over many hours. On the other hand, the might have added sugar beet syrup (the German equivalent to molasses) or caramel color.

Otherwise, this dark color can only be achieved over hours of slow baking. Whether they can do that in a busy hotel kitchen (or whether it's being made on the premises at all, is the question.

If all who participate can come up with a workable solution to make something involved as this, has fun in the process, uses a few ingredients they wouldn't have added otherwise, and achieves a nice, flavorful bread, that is the best thing that can happen. We don't have to clone the Cecilienhof rye bread.

Scratch Lucy behind the ears for me,

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

beverages of course.  I'm still thinking the agent orange bread could really use a little bit of increasingly rare minneola arancello to put it over the top :-)  You will like this challenge bake because it is fun and the bread is very good too.  Paul is onto something with the low and slow baking method to bring out the dark color.

Lucy is looking forward to your semolina and Agent Orange bread.  Agent Orange might be Lucy's problem now that I think about it? 

Enjoy the football,  Eli didn't do well against his brother last week and is now 0-3 when the Manning bowl  come around.  What a great football quarterback family though - never been one like it! 

isand66's picture
isand66

Alas my orange fantasy bread was relegated to the trash.  Not even worth making bread crumbs.  I should know better and used to high a percentage of the liquor to water which messed up the fermentation and I ended up with a door stop.

I know I will have better luck with the semolina as that one will be more straight forward hopefully.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Ian, what was that? Did you need to defoliate?

Karin

isand66's picture
isand66

I used some orange liquor and some orange olive oil in a bread I baked off last night....as I have found out from past disasters if you use too much alcohol in making dough it screws up the fermentation and you end up with a brick...hopefully my next bake tomorrow morning will not end up in the compost pile.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

comes in at 37.5% alcohol so it isn't like baking with beer - a little goes a long way especially;ly with orange olive in there too   I was t=really looking forward to this one too :-(  Max would still love it i bet - or he is not a a real canine balking apprentice!

Hopefully the semolina bread will come out well to put a band aid on the  AO wound and the compost pile from growing.  Wife is out of town this weekend so made a new Italian Italian sausage recipe this morning. three kinds of pickles after lunch and started a nice peppercorn, half pastrami spice, maple, bacon cure this afternoon.  Ran out of smoked bacon and i'm not buying any from the store any more than Lucy would buy their artisan par baked loaf.

  Once you start making you own bread and curing and smoking meats.... then the store bought stuff just won't cut it anymore - like store bought limocello, arancello and beer :-)

Good luck with tomorow's bake Ian - football happiness depends on  it!

wassisname's picture
wassisname

An inspired answer to the challenge, dabrownman!  OK so the formula has me on the verge of a math anxiety attack, but it must taste incredible!  I'm going to go breathe into a paper bag for a minute and then think long and hard about putting together a nice, hearty bread very soon.  Great stuff!

Marcus

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I kind of feel sorry for the German baker who pieced the original recipe together, but it was fun trying to figure it out.   and then having it turn out so well.  It is an awfully good tasting bread and easy enough to make.   It also helps to have a German baking apprentice who has most of the ingredients at hand.  Those German bakers sure are prepared for just about any baking challenge:-)

Glad you like the bread Marcus,  These kinds of breads are our favorites to bake and munch on - just delicioius.

Happy baking

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Dabrownman, 

I like the nut-mix and all those additions in your formula.

And all those colorful dinner plates make me salivate

And that sunset ... Pretty grey here in South England these days.

Juergen

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and decided to do your example pumpernickel style, but I have been putting up with Lucy all day, since she saw your post, growling beneath her scowl  "See I told you bake it low and slow like Juergen did ....but nnnnoooooo!!!!!  How you got to be the master baker around here is beyond me!"  What I have to deal with most days in the kitchen is beyond the pale with her!

I could really use use some grey and mid 90's since it is Fall!  !05 F all last week again!  They dais it was the hottest average temperature summer in Phoenix ever this year.  They take the high temp and low temp for the day and divide by two to get the average daily temp and then add all the average daily temps for the summer and divide that by the number of days.  This year was 96.1 F and old records wast 59.9 F.  We didn't have the blistering hot day;s over 115 this year but it never got low at night either, - I 'm summered out!

We love to bake around here but really like to cook.  No one ever goes hungry and complainers don't get invited back -except for Lucy and she doesn't complain much about anything she eats por she has to do the dishes too.:-)

Japan may have better sunsets than AZ - but nit by much.  Any sunset with water is better in my book.

We loved your Challenge Bread and can't wait to see how the rest of them end up and look like.  What a fun bake!

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

But where would be the fun without them!

If the fog manages to lift we might have a sunset over the sea tonight ... 

Here in Brighton we have this luxury during the winter months.

Happy Cooking,

Juergen

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

were made for each other.  What a treat to be where you can see them together when ever the clouds work their magic with a total overcast.  I can sit with an adult beverage and do nothing but watch the sun set every night the clouds show up but not too much.   No ocean here but we do have the lake. Water makes all the difference.

Happy baking Juergen.