The Fresh Loaf

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Hanseata's challenge loaf, my take . . .

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Skibum's picture
Skibum

Hanseata's challenge loaf, my take . . .

. . . okay Karin, dab my first take at this style of bread. I just crossed over to the 'dark side!'  I was almost afraid to cut into this loaf and now I am wondering what to pair it with --  pickled herring, lox with onions and capers and stinky cheese come to mind, but I welcome any suggestions.

So in the end my mix was Karin's Friesisches-schwarzbrot:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18037/friesisches-schwarzbrot-friesian-rye

To which I added 25 grams steel cut oats, and 20 grams each of wheat germ and sesame seeds, toasted and added as 'toadies.'  and 11/2 Tbs canola oil. Not having molasses, I used malt syrup.

 

Hey in the loaf pan and topped with seeds it almost looks like a loaf after 8 hours in the fridge.  I baked this one up after about 24 hours in the fridge and 2 hours to warm up on the counter.  I didn't get big rise and didn't expect it.

After 30 minutes as per directions, I could not get the loaf out of the pan, so finished baking in the pan for 20 convection, turning at the half, finally got the loaf released and baked on the stone for a further 6 minutes turning at the half.

Karin, thanks for starting this, it has been a fun and very different bread baking experience for me and I am enjoying the complex flavours and textures in this bread.  Very cool!

Thanks!  Brian

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks great Brian.

The force is strong in you Brian!  Looks like you ended up with a great looking bread that must taste great.

I have not had a chance to try my take on this yet.  Hopefully some time this week.

Cheers,
ian

Skibum's picture
Skibum

. . . be with you too Ian!  A much different and satisfying bake for this old skibum . . .

Regards, Brian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Brian,

Yours looks similar in color to my loaf.  I am already conjuring up 'take tw and increasing the rye. 

Sorry to hear about the problem with getting it out of the pan….sure can't tell from the picture that you had to wrestle it out.

Now you have been initiated into loaves like this….pretty simple eh?  Just different in the mixing.  A very wholesome loaf to have around on cold winter days.  

Thanks for posting a photo of your results.

Janet

Skibum's picture
Skibum

A much different bake and you are right Janet, it was way simpler than I first suspected it would be.  I'm still not brave enough to do the dman slap and folds, but am definitely moving to the 'dark side.'  Thanks for your encouraging remarks!  Brian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin's method takes the fear out of trying these types of bread.  Really quite simple.  Almost like a quick bread dough.

Andy's Borodinsky is similar in process though a scald is used which I use due to my grains being freshly milled.  The scald helps control the enzymes from turning the bread into a gummy mess.  The process reads like it is very complicated but, once you actually do it, it is actually quite simple.  No slap and folds.  Just spoon stirring until the final dough for which I do use my mixer.  

Baking with whole grains isn't as difficult as one would believe.  I do it all the time though I do use my DLX to mix and use stretch and folds as a follow up.  Main difference is in water content and gluten development.  Needs more water and longer mixing.  Flavor can't be beat *^}

Take Care,

Janet

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that this bread tastes pretty darn good for very little work:-)  The taste to work ratio, as opposed to labs to yeast ratio,  is about 10 I'm guessing.  I see some nice holes in the crumb too but no cracks in the top? I guessing this could have proofed even longer on the counter? I love these breads because they have their own fool proof poke test built in - when they crack they are ready for the oven!

I'm glad you got a chance to try one fo these r=fine bread out.  Pastrami, pate, ancient white cheddar, extra sharp Cheddar, Limburger, ripe brie, stone fruits and sliced apple, Mexican or cured Spanish chorizo, Spanish hot sausage, Dijon mustard, hot Italian cured meats, pickles, kimchee or sauerkraut and  all are a nice foil for these kinds of breads.  They are my favorites  for flavor and when baked pumpernickel style the most taste per bite ever.  No one knew grain flavor could be so complex and deep' You did really well Brian. 

Skibum's picture
Skibum

. . . some of your suggested food pairings and had to go and get something to eat --  seriously!  Your posts have a habit of stimulating my appetite when I read them and I just finished half of a papaya with lime.  It probable has something to do with all of the amazing food photos you also post and the influence of your super cute apprentice. (she needs a nice treat!)

Sorry dab, no crack in the top.  I will take your advice for my next 'dark side' bake, which is not too far away.

I also love some of your food pairing suggestions!  I had not thought of using stone fruits, but the peaches are looking very fine.  Let's see, peach slices with proscuitto and perhaps some hot pancetta.  Okay, I am still hungry and now drooling . . .

Best regards, Brian

Skibum's picture
Skibum

I paired this for lunch today with herring in tomato sauce and anchovies, (awesome pairing).  Sadly I could not find pickled herring in Canmore.:-(  My second pairing was blue cheese and a nectarine slice and washed sown with a Modavi Woodbridge cab.  Awesome!

This has been a whole new bread and sandwich experience for me.  I am loving the flavours and textures!  So thanks Karin, Janet and dab for convincing me to try the challenge.  You are now going to have to make some room for me on the 'dark side!'

Many thanks from a well fed skibum!  

Regards, Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

but don't give up your place on the light side  either.  Those breads are just as good only different - like my apprentice!  Iv'e still got some Pate Maison in the fridge to finish off with fruits and cheese this evening .

hanseata's picture
hanseata

You did a great job, Brian, your bread looks really very tasty!

Germans would pair a dark rye like that with smoked ham (Katenschinken) or cheese. Or Fleischsalat (meat salad).

Jürgen Krauss just tweeted a picture of his take on the bread, the TFL post will follow.

I will start with it today.

Karin

 

 

 

Skibum's picture
Skibum

The challenge persuaded me to bake a loaf I have never tried before and I am enjoying the results!  I will definitely be baking in this style again and actually await the next 'challenge!'  I must now try the Fleischsalat, but am still dreaming of peach slices with proscuitto and hot capicolla . . .  Endless possibilities.

Regards, Brian

hanseata's picture
hanseata

And make me smile.

Karin

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

and Welcome to the "dark side"

Juergen

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Looks nutritious and flavourful, as good bread should be. Keep it up! :)

Zita


hanseata's picture
hanseata

I just looked at my formula for the Friesisches Schwarzbrot, and saw a comment I made after the last bake that unmolding the loaf after half an hour is not really necessary. How did the temperature work out for you?

I just started with my Cecilienhof Bread, with the Friesisches Schwarzbrot procedure as basis.

Karin

Skibum's picture
Skibum

. . . just fine.  The longer baking in the pan allowed me to remove the loaf without damage.  I look forward to seeing your results!  Brian